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I've written a traits class that lets me extract information about the arguments and type of a function or function object in C++0x (tested with gcc 4.5.0). The general case handles function objects:

template <typename F>
struct function_traits {
    template <typename R, typename... A>
    struct _internal { };

    template <typename R, typename... A>
    struct _internal<R (F::*)(A...)> {
        // ...
    };

    typedef typename _internal<decltype(&F::operator())>::<<nested types go here>>;
};

Then I have a specialization for plain functions at global scope:

template <typename R, typename... A>
struct function_traits<R (*)(A...)> {
    // ...
};

This works fine, I can pass a function into the template or a function object and it works properly:

template <typename F>
void foo(F f) {
    typename function_traits<F>::whatever ...;
}

int f(int x) { ... }
foo(f);

What if, instead of passing a function or function object into foo, I want to pass a lambda expression?

foo([](int x) { ... });

The problem here is that neither specialization of function_traits<> applies. The C++0x draft says that the type of the expression is a "unique, unnamed, non-union class type". Demangling the result of calling typeid(...).name() on the expression gives me what appears to be gcc's internal naming convention for the lambda, main::{lambda(int)#1}, not something that syntactically represents a C++ typename.

In short, is there anything I can put into the template here:

template <typename R, typename... A>
struct function_traits<????> { ... }

that will allow this traits class to accept a lambda expression?

share|improve this question
    
No. Why do you think you need something like this? –  sellibitze Apr 1 '10 at 18:10
1  
I thought my example gave a decent use case: If I have a generic algorithm that takes in a function or function object, I can use this traits class to determine not only the return type (which could also be done with decltype nowadays), but also the types of the arguments. (I left out the bulk of the code to keep the post from being too long.) Since I can pass in a function or function object, for orthogonality purposes I'd like to be able to pass in a lambda as well. This is all basically an academic exercise that arose from reading "Elements of Programming". –  Tony Allevato Apr 1 '10 at 18:23
    
@Tony: The answer is yes, I've done it. I'll be able to get back to this question a bit later, though. What traits are you trying to get? –  GManNickG Apr 1 '10 at 19:13
    
I should clarify: yes depending on what you want. –  GManNickG Apr 1 '10 at 19:25
    
Basically I'm interested in the type of the function result and the types/number of its arguments; the things represented by R and A... in the template above. I just played around with it some more and a lambda of the form [](int x) { return x; } can be explicitly cast to a regular function pointer int(*)(int), so it seems like there should be a way to use that to my advantage. I just need to make it work in conjunction with the other two versions of function_traits, especially the one for function objects that doesn't specialize on its argument. –  Tony Allevato Apr 1 '10 at 21:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I think it is possible to specialize traits for lambdas and do pattern matching on the signature of the unnamed functor. Here is the code that works on g++ 4.5. Although it works, the pattern matching on lambda appears to be working contrary to the intuition. I've comments inline.

struct X
{
  float operator () (float i) { return i*2; }
  // If the following is enabled, program fails to compile
  // mostly because of ambiguity reasons.
  //double operator () (float i, double d) { return d*f; } 
};

template <typename T>
struct function_traits // matches when T=X or T=lambda
// As expected, lambda creates a "unique, unnamed, non-union class type" 
// so it matches here
{
  // Here is what you are looking for. The type of the member operator()
  // of the lambda is taken and mapped again on function_traits.
  typedef typename function_traits<decltype(&T::operator())>::return_type return_type;
};

// matches for X::operator() but not of lambda::operator()
template <typename R, typename C, typename... A>
struct function_traits<R (C::*)(A...)> 
{
  typedef R return_type;
};

// I initially thought the above defined member function specialization of 
// the trait will match lambdas::operator() because a lambda is a functor.
// It does not, however. Instead, it matches the one below.
// I wonder why? implementation defined?
template <typename R, typename... A>
struct function_traits<R (*)(A...)> // matches for lambda::operator() 
{
  typedef R return_type;
};

template <typename F>
typename function_traits<F>::return_type
foo(F f)
{
  return f(10);
}

template <typename F>
typename function_traits<F>::return_type
bar(F f)
{
  return f(5.0f, 100, 0.34);
}

int f(int x) { return x + x;  }

int main(void)
{
  foo(f);
  foo(X());
  bar([](float f, int l, double d){ return f+l+d; });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that did the trick. It didn't occur to me to just chain the non-specialized template onto the specialized version like that. Once I saw it, it looks incredibly elegant and obvious. –  Tony Allevato Apr 2 '10 at 11:53
    
I'm glad it helped. It seems like even though the syntax of getting at the operator() of a lambda is like class's member function, lambda is afterall an anonymous free standing function and matches R ()(A...) but not R (C::)(A...). –  Sumant Apr 2 '10 at 15:25
2  
I suppose the reasoning behind it might be that "C" in this case would be an implementation-defined type, and providing access to it through a template argument would allow us to do nonsensical things like define typedef aliases for it. Since we can't do anything with the lambda type except call it like a function, it makes more sense from a language design perspective to force that to be the specialization that applies. –  Tony Allevato Apr 2 '10 at 19:04
    
Try it with a captured variable in the [] too, since (n3333 std draft) section 5.1.2 Lambda Expressions [expr.prim.lambda] "6. The closure type for a lambda-expression with no lambda-capture has a public non-virtual non-explicit const conversion function to pointer to function having the same parameter and return types as the closure type’s function call operator. The value returned by this conversion function shall be the address of a function that, when invoked, has the same effect as invoking the closure type’s function call operator." –  idupree Jun 7 '12 at 6:44
2  
(I deleted my comment accidentally, here it is again): The decltype(&T::operator()) of a lambda (capture, or non-capture) will match on template struct function_traits<R (C::*)(A...) const> but not template struct function_traits<R (C::*)(A...)>. Note the const near the end. Basically, don't forget cv-qualifiers on *this. For more, see stackoverflow.com/questions/25654186/… –  Aaron McDaid Sep 3 '14 at 23:03

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