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Although a static class has only one instance and can't be instantiated, a class with a private constructor can't be instantiated (as the constructor can't be seen), so every time you call this class, this is the same one instance?

Factory classes always follow the last convention (instance class with private constructor). Why is this?

Thanks

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2  
Actually you can create an instance without ever calling the constructor. See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Brian Rasmussen Apr 1 '10 at 20:59
    
Pro tip: there's never a need for the programming tag here. Any question that wouldn't qualify as "programming" is typically closed, making the tag unnecessary and redundant. –  Joel Coehoorn Apr 1 '10 at 20:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There's nothing stopping the class with the private constructor from having a public static method which returns instances of the class:

public class NoPublicConstructor
{
    private NoPublicConstructor()
    {
    }

    public static NoPublicConstructor NewInstance()
    {
        return new NoPublicConstructor();
    }
}

As you can see, the static method does not return the same one instance.

edit: One of the reasons factory classes do this is to be able to separate responsibility in future versions: while your code always calls the factory creation method, the author may move all the "guts" out of that class into a different one and your code won't need to know the difference. Calling that class' (public) constructor ties it to an extent to the original class implementation.

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I'm kind of wondering the same thing as the questioner, why not take your example and change it to "public static class NoPublicConstructor"? What is the difference? I'm guessing this maybe has something to do with testability and the capbaility to use a mock factory in it's place when doing unit testing. –  AaronLS Apr 1 '10 at 21:00
    
@AaronLS, the point Jesse is making is not what you should do, but demonstrating the difference between a static class and a class with no public constructor. The point is that you can still get an instance of the latter class. Whether or not you want someone to be able to is a design choice. –  Anthony Pegram Apr 1 '10 at 21:03
    
@Anthony: spot-on. There is certainly a fairly large codebase which also uses a combination of the two as a lazily-instantiated singleton. While that can be achieved with a purely static class with a child class embedded (Jon Skeet had a great article though I can't recall the link), a good helping of .NET code ported from Java follows the private constructor, public instance accessor of the singleton object model. –  Jesse C. Slicer Apr 1 '10 at 21:07
    
while your code always calls the factory creation method, the author may move all the "guts" out of that class into a different one and your code won't need to know the difference - how would this work? The code for the callee will still need to be updated? Thanks. –  dotnetdev Apr 2 '10 at 0:10

You can't* get an instance from outside the class, but you can from inside. A static method or an inner class can create and return an instance of the class with a private constructor. The static class cannot be instanced by anything.

class Foo
{
    private Foo()
    {
    }

    public class Bar
    {
        public Bar()
        {
        }

        public Foo GetFoo()
        {
            return new Foo();
        }
    }
}

..

Foo.Bar fooBar = new Foo.Bar();
Foo foo = fooBar.GetFoo();

Edit: *I use the term "can't" loosely. Brian Rasmussen pointed out in the comments to the OP that another method to obtain an instance is through a call through System.Runtime.Serialization.FormatterServices, and this is external to the class itself.

Foo foo = (Foo)System.Runtime.Serialization.FormatterServices.GetSafeUninitializedObject(typeof(Foo));
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Creating a class with private constructor is the common pattern for implementing a "Singleton" object.

The Singleton usually will instantiate an instance of itself, and only allow access to it through a static "Instance" property, which means there's only ever one instance of the class.

The advantage of using a Singleton over a purely static class is that you can utilize interfaces and different implementation classes within the singleton. Your "Singleton" might expose an interface for a set of methods, and you can choose which exact implementation class to instantiate under the covers. If you were using a purely static class, it would be hard to swap out a completely different implementation, without impacting other code.

The main downside of Singleton is that it's difficult to swap out the implementation class for testing, because it's controlled within the Singleton private methods, but there are ways to get around that.

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