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In C# 4.0 I am doing the following:

public string PropertyA
{
  get;
  set
  {
    DoSomething("PropertyA");
  }
}

public string PropertyB
{
  get;
  set
  {
    DoSomething("PropertyB");
  }
}

..I have a lot of these properties and doing it manually will be a pain. Is there a way I could replace this with:

public string PropertyA
{
  get;
  set
  {
    DoSomething(GetNameOfProperty());
  }
}

..maybe using reflection?

share|improve this question
2  
It doesn't help much now, but C# 6 will feature a nameof operator, which will do something similar to what you are looking for, and with compile-time checking. (Presumeably, you'll still have to write the property name twice everywhere, but the compiler will tell you if you misspelt it somewhere.) –  O. R. Mapper Sep 3 at 12:09
    
Sounds like an XY problem - What problem are you trying to solve by doing this? –  Sayse Sep 3 at 12:10
2  
@Sayse Doesn't sound like it to me. This is a common pattern for implementing INotifyPropertyChanged. –  hvd Sep 3 at 12:11
    
@hvd - Ah very true, its been a while since I implemented that –  Sayse Sep 3 at 12:12
    
If you're targeting .NET Framework 4.5 you can use CallerMemberNameAttribute –  Ivan Zub Sep 3 at 12:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In .NET 4.5 your DoSomething method should use the [CallerMemberName] parameter attribute:

void DoSomething([CallerMemberName] string memberName = "")
{
    // memberName will be PropertyB
}

Then just call it like this:

public string PropertyA
{
     get
     {
         ...
     }
     set
     {
         DoSomething();
     }
}

See MSDN on this.

share|improve this answer
    
CallerMemberNameAttribute is not available in C# 4.0. –  hvd Sep 3 at 12:13
    
Did this also exists in .Net 4.0 –  Jens Kloster Sep 3 at 12:13
2  
It can work for .NET 4.0, provided you define your own CallerMemberNameAttribute type and use a C# 5.0 compiler. It's just in C# 4.0 that it doesn't work. –  hvd Sep 3 at 12:15

There is no way to do this in current C# versions, reflection won't help. You could hack this with expressions and get compile time checking, but that's about it, you'd have to type even more code too

 DoSomething(()=>this.PropertyA); // have dosomething take an expression and parse that to find the member access expression, you'll get the name there

A good alternative if that's possible for you would be to use Postsharp to do this instead in a clean way, but that may not always be possible.

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You can use reflection of GetCurrentMethod.

public string PropertyA
{
    get;
    set
    {
        DoSomething(MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().Name.Substring(4));
    }
}

It's available for .Net 4.

As @hvd explains, the Name will return set_PropertyA, then use Substring to take the property name.

share|improve this answer
1  
@Sayse The current method will be the property setter, named set_PropertyA. That also explains the .Substring(4). –  hvd Sep 3 at 12:17
    
@John, is this the reflection you are looking for? –  Yuliam Chandra Sep 3 at 12:42

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