Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Im writing a program that should read input via stdin, so I have the following contruct.

FILE *fp=stdin;

But this just hangs if the user hasn't piped anything into the program, how can I check if the user is actually piping data into my program like

gunzip -c file.gz |./a.out #should work
./a.out  #should exit program with nice msg.

thanks

share|improve this question
    
For the record, the program is not hanging; it's simply waiting for input. If you send an EOF (Ctrl-D on most platforms), it's interpreted as if the input ended early. –  greyfade Apr 2 '10 at 2:59
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Since you're using file pointers, you'll need both isatty() and fileno() to do this:

#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    FILE* fp = stdin;

    if(isatty(fileno(fp)))
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "A nice msg.\n");
        exit(1);
    }

    /* carry on... */
    return 0;
}

Actually, that's the long way. The short way is to not use file pointers:

#include <unistd.h>

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    if(isatty(STDIN_FILENO))
    {
        fprintf(stderr, "A nice msg.\n");
        exit(1);
    }

    /* carry on... */
    return 0;
}

Several standard Unix programs do this check to modify their behavior. For example, if you have ls set up to give you pretty colors, it will turn the colors off if you pipe its stdout to another program.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Try "man isatty", I think that function will tell you if you are talking to the user or not.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Passing stdin to select() or poll() should tell you if input is waiting. Under many OSes you can also tell if stdin is a tty or pipe.

EDIT: I see I'm going to have to emphasize the also part of the tty test. A fifo is not a tty, yet there might be no input ready for an indefinite amount of time.

share|improve this answer
    
I think the OP just wanted to cover the run-on-command-line-and-wonder-why-it-"hangs" case. Probably trying to fix a PEBKAC bug. Sitting there waiting on a FIFO or other pipe would be okay. –  Mike DeSimone Apr 2 '10 at 11:56
add comment

Use isatty to detect that stdin is coming from a terminal rather than a redirect.

share|improve this answer
add comment

See the function "isatty" - if STDIN is a terminal, you can skip reading from it. If it's not a terminal, you're getting data piped or redirected and you can read until EOF.

share|improve this answer
add comment

An additional option you get with select() is setting a timeout for reading from stdin (with respect to either the first read from stdin or consecutive reads from stdin).

For a code example using select on stdin see:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1594251/how-to-check-if-stdin-is-still-opened-without-blocking

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.