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absolute="/foo/bar"
current="/foo/baz/foo"

# magic

relative="../../bar"

Can you help me with magic? (Hopefully not too complicated code...)

share|improve this question
3  
What's the purpose of this? –  sapht Aug 11 '11 at 12:03
3  
For example (my case right now) for giving gcc relative path so it can generate relative debug infos usable even if source path change. –  Offirmo Sep 19 '12 at 16:07
    
A question similar to this one was asked on U&L: unix.stackexchange.com/questions/100918/…. One of the answers (@Gilles) mentions a tool, symlinks, which can make easy work of this problem. –  slm Nov 13 '13 at 0:56

20 Answers 20

$ python -c "import os.path; print os.path.relpath('/foo/bar', '/foo/baz/foo')"

gives:

../../bar
share|improve this answer
6  
It works, and it makes the alternatives look ridiculous. That's a bonus for me xD –  hasvn Mar 19 '12 at 16:54
11  
+1. Ok, you cheated... but this is too good not to be used! relpath(){ python -c "import os.path; print os.path.relpath('$1','${2:-$PWD}')" ; } –  MestreLion Apr 4 '12 at 18:27
    
Sadly, this is not available universally: os.path.relpath is new in Python 2.6. –  Chen Levy Nov 15 '12 at 11:01
4  
looking for the answer in bash –  dpurrington Mar 13 '13 at 20:15
6  
@ChenLevy: Python 2.6 was released in 2008. Hard to believe it wasn't universally available in 2012. –  MestreLion Aug 23 '13 at 7:29

This is a corrected, fully fonctional improvement of the currently best rated solution from @pini (which sadly handle only a few cases)

Reminder : '-z' test if the string is zero-length (=empty) and '-n' test if the string is not empty.

# both $1 and $2 are absolute paths beginning with /
# returns relative path to $2/$target from $1/$source
source=$1
target=$2

common_part=$source # for now
result="" # for now

while [[ "${target#$common_part}" == "${target}" ]]; do
    # no match, means that candidate common part is not correct
    # go up one level (reduce common part)
    common_part="$(dirname $common_part)"
    # and record that we went back, with correct / handling
    if [[ -z $result ]]; then
        result=".."
    else
        result="../$result"
    fi
done

if [[ $common_part == "/" ]]; then
    # special case for root (no common path)
    result="$result/"
fi

# since we now have identified the common part,
# compute the non-common part
forward_part="${target#$common_part}"

# and now stick all parts together
if [[ -n $result ]] && [[ -n $forward_part ]]; then
    result="$result$forward_part"
elif [[ -n $forward_part ]]; then
    # extra slash removal
    result="${forward_part:1}"
fi

echo $result

Test cases :

compute_relative.sh "/A/B/C" "/A"           -->  "../.."
compute_relative.sh "/A/B/C" "/A/B"         -->  ".."
compute_relative.sh "/A/B/C" "/A/B/C"       -->  ""
compute_relative.sh "/A/B/C" "/A/B/C/D"     -->  "D"
compute_relative.sh "/A/B/C" "/A/B/C/D/E"   -->  "D/E"
compute_relative.sh "/A/B/C" "/A/B/D"       -->  "../D"
compute_relative.sh "/A/B/C" "/A/B/D/E"     -->  "../D/E"
compute_relative.sh "/A/B/C" "/A/D"         -->  "../../D"
compute_relative.sh "/A/B/C" "/A/D/E"       -->  "../../D/E"
compute_relative.sh "/A/B/C" "/D/E/F"       -->  "../../../D/E/F"
share|improve this answer
    
Integrated in offirmo shell lib github.com/Offirmo/offirmo-shell-lib, function «OSL_FILE_find_relative_path» (file «osl_lib_file.sh») –  Offirmo Dec 3 '12 at 14:53
1  
+1. It can easily be made to handle any paths (not just absolute paths starting with /) by replacing source=$1; target=$2 with source=$(realpath $1); target=$(realpath $2) –  Josh Kelley Sep 11 '13 at 12:54
2  
@Josh indeed, provided that the dirs actually exists... which was unconvenient for the unit tests ;) But in real use yes, realpath is recommended, or source=$(readlink -f $1) etc. if realpath is not available (not standard) –  Offirmo Sep 11 '13 at 13:06
    
I defined $source and $target like this: ` if [[ -e $1 ]]; then source=$(readlink -f $1); else source=$1; fi if [[ -e $2 ]]; then target=$(readlink -f $2); else target=$2; fi` That way, the function could heandle real/existsing relative paths as well as fictional directories. –  Nathan S. Watson-Haigh Jul 2 at 4:01
    
@NathanS.Watson-Haigh Even better, I discovered recently readlink has a -m option which just does that ;) –  Offirmo Jul 2 at 12:36
#!/bin/bash
# both $1 and $2 are absolute paths
# returns $2 relative to $1

source=$1
target=$2

common_part=$source
back=
while [ "${target#$common_part}" = "${target}" ]; do
  common_part=$(dirname $common_part)
  back="../${back}"
done

echo ${back}${target#$common_part/}
share|improve this answer
    
Wonderful script -- short and clean. I applied an edit (Waiting on peer review): common_part=$source/ common_part=$(dirname $common_part)/ echo ${back}${target#$common_part} Existing script would fail due to inappropriate match on start of directory name when comparing, for example: "/foo/bar/baz" to "/foo/barsucks/bonk". Moving the slash into the var and out of the final eval corrects that bug. –  jcwenger Jun 10 '11 at 15:31
1  
This script simply doesn't work. Fails one a simple "one directory down" tests. The edits by jcwenger work a little better but tend to add an extra "../". –  Dr. Person Person II Jul 23 '11 at 13:01
1  
it fails for me in some cases if a trailing "/" is on the argument; e.g., if $1="$HOME/" and $2="$HOME/temp", it returns "/home/user/temp/", but if $1=$HOME then it properly returns the relative path "temp". Both source=$1 and target=$2 could therefore be "cleansed" using sed (or using bash variable substitution, but that can be unnecessarily opaque) such as => source=$(echo "${1}" | sed 's/\/*$//') –  michael_n Mar 28 '12 at 22:04
1  
Minor improvement: Instead of setting source/target directly to $1 and $2, do: source=$(cd $1; pwd) target=$(cd $2; pwd). This way it handles paths with . and .. correctly. –  Joseph Garvin Apr 4 '12 at 15:11
1  
Despite being the top-voted answer, this answer has lot of limitations, hence so many other answers being posted. See the other answers instead, especially the one displaying test cases. And please upvote this comment ! –  Offirmo Oct 1 '12 at 9:25

Python's os.path.relpath as a shell function

The goal of this relpath exercise is to mimic Python 2.7's os.path.relpath function (available from Python version 2.6 but only working properly in 2.7), as proposed by xni. As a consequence, some of the results may differ from functions provided in other answers.

(I have not tested with newlines in paths simply because it breaks the validation based on calling python -c from ZSH. It would certainly be possible with some effort.)

Regarding “magic” in Bash, I have given up looking for magic in Bash long ago, but I have since found all the magic I need, and then some, in ZSH.

Consequently, I propose two implementations.

The first implementation aims to be fully POSIX-compliant. I have tested it with /bin/dash on Debian 6.0.6 “Squeeze”. It also works perfectly with /bin/sh on OS X 10.8.3, which is actually Bash version 3.2 pretending to be a POSIX shell.

The second implementation is a ZSH shell function that is robust against multiple slashes and other nuisances in paths. If you have ZSH available, this is the recommended version, even if you are calling it in the script form presented below (i.e. with a shebang of #!/usr/bin/env zsh) from another shell.

Finally, I have written a ZSH script that verifies the output of the relpath command found in $PATH given the test cases provided in other answers. I added some spice to those tests by adding some spaces, tabs, and punctuation such as ! ? * here and there and also threw in yet another test with exotic UTF-8 characters found in vim-powerline.

POSIX shell function

First, the POSIX-compliant shell function. It works with a variety of paths, but does not clean multiple slashes or resolve symlinks.

#!/bin/sh
relpath () {
    [ $# -ge 1 ] && [ $# -le 2 ] || return 1
    current="${2:+"$1"}"
    target="${2:-"$1"}"
    [ "$target" != . ] || target=/
    target="/${target##/}"
    [ "$current" != . ] || current=/
    current="${current:="/"}"
    current="/${current##/}"
    appendix="${target##/}"
    relative=''
    while appendix="${target#"$current"/}"
        [ "$current" != '/' ] && [ "$appendix" = "$target" ]; do
        if [ "$current" = "$appendix" ]; then
            relative="${relative:-.}"
            echo "${relative#/}"
            return 0
        fi
        current="${current%/*}"
        relative="$relative${relative:+/}.."
    done
    relative="$relative${relative:+${appendix:+/}}${appendix#/}"
    echo "$relative"
}
relpath "$@"

ZSH shell function

Now, the more robust zsh version. If you would like it to resolve the arguments to real paths à la realpath -f (available in the Linux coreutils package), replace the :a on lines 3 and 4 with :A.

To use this in zsh, remove the first and last line and put it in a directory that is in your $FPATH variable.

#!/usr/bin/env zsh
relpath () {
    [[ $# -ge 1 ]] && [[ $# -le 2 ]] || return 1
    local target=${${2:-$1}:a} # replace `:a' by `:A` to resolve symlinks
    local current=${${${2:+$1}:-$PWD}:a} # replace `:a' by `:A` to resolve symlinks
    local appendix=${target#/}
    local relative=''
    while appendix=${target#$current/}
        [[ $current != '/' ]] && [[ $appendix = $target ]]; do
        if [[ $current = $appendix ]]; then
            relative=${relative:-.}
            print ${relative#/}
            return 0
        fi
        current=${current%/*}
        relative="$relative${relative:+/}.."
    done
    relative+=${relative:+${appendix:+/}}${appendix#/}
    print $relative
}
relpath "$@"

Test script

Finally, the test script. It accepts one option, namely -v to enable verbose output.

#!/usr/bin/env zsh
set -eu
VERBOSE=false
script_name=$(basename $0)

usage () {
    print "\n    Usage: $script_name SRC_PATH DESTINATION_PATH\n" >&2
    exit ${1:=1}
}
vrb () { $VERBOSE && print -P ${(%)@} || return 0; }

relpath_check () {
    [[ $# -ge 1 ]] && [[ $# -le 2 ]] || return 1
    target=${${2:-$1}}
    prefix=${${${2:+$1}:-$PWD}}
    result=$(relpath $prefix $target)
    # Compare with python's os.path.relpath function
    py_result=$(python -c "import os.path; print os.path.relpath('$target', '$prefix')")
    col='%F{green}'
    if [[ $result != $py_result ]] && col='%F{red}' || $VERBOSE; then
        print -P "${col}Source: '$prefix'\nDestination: '$target'%f"
        print -P "${col}relpath: ${(qq)result}%f"
        print -P "${col}python:  ${(qq)py_result}%f\n"
    fi
}

run_checks () {
    print "Running checks..."

    relpath_check '/    a   b/å/⮀*/!' '/    a   b/å/⮀/xäå/?'

    relpath_check '/'  '/A'
    relpath_check '/A'  '/'
    relpath_check '/  & /  !/*/\\/E' '/'
    relpath_check '/' '/  & /  !/*/\\/E'
    relpath_check '/  & /  !/*/\\/E' '/  & /  !/?/\\/E/F'
    relpath_check '/X/Y' '/  & /  !/C/\\/E/F'
    relpath_check '/  & /  !/C' '/A'
    relpath_check '/A /  !/C' '/A /B'
    relpath_check '/Â/  !/C' '/Â/  !/C'
    relpath_check '/  & /B / C' '/  & /B / C/D'
    relpath_check '/  & /  !/C' '/  & /  !/C/\\/Ê'
    relpath_check '/Å/  !/C' '/Å/  !/D'
    relpath_check '/.A /*B/C' '/.A /*B/\\/E'
    relpath_check '/  & /  !/C' '/  & /D'
    relpath_check '/  & /  !/C' '/  & /\\/E'
    relpath_check '/  & /  !/C' '/\\/E/F'

    relpath_check /home/part1/part2 /home/part1/part3
    relpath_check /home/part1/part2 /home/part4/part5
    relpath_check /home/part1/part2 /work/part6/part7
    relpath_check /home/part1       /work/part1/part2/part3/part4
    relpath_check /home             /work/part2/part3
    relpath_check /                 /work/part2/part3/part4
    relpath_check /home/part1/part2 /home/part1/part2/part3/part4
    relpath_check /home/part1/part2 /home/part1/part2/part3
    relpath_check /home/part1/part2 /home/part1/part2
    relpath_check /home/part1/part2 /home/part1
    relpath_check /home/part1/part2 /home
    relpath_check /home/part1/part2 /
    relpath_check /home/part1/part2 /work
    relpath_check /home/part1/part2 /work/part1
    relpath_check /home/part1/part2 /work/part1/part2
    relpath_check /home/part1/part2 /work/part1/part2/part3
    relpath_check /home/part1/part2 /work/part1/part2/part3/part4 
    relpath_check home/part1/part2 home/part1/part3
    relpath_check home/part1/part2 home/part4/part5
    relpath_check home/part1/part2 work/part6/part7
    relpath_check home/part1       work/part1/part2/part3/part4
    relpath_check home             work/part2/part3
    relpath_check .                work/part2/part3
    relpath_check home/part1/part2 home/part1/part2/part3/part4
    relpath_check home/part1/part2 home/part1/part2/part3
    relpath_check home/part1/part2 home/part1/part2
    relpath_check home/part1/part2 home/part1
    relpath_check home/part1/part2 home
    relpath_check home/part1/part2 .
    relpath_check home/part1/part2 work
    relpath_check home/part1/part2 work/part1
    relpath_check home/part1/part2 work/part1/part2
    relpath_check home/part1/part2 work/part1/part2/part3
    relpath_check home/part1/part2 work/part1/part2/part3/part4

    print "Done with checks."
}
if [[ $# -gt 0 ]] && [[ $1 = "-v" ]]; then
    VERBOSE=true
    shift
fi
if [[ $# -eq 0 ]]; then
    run_checks
else
    VERBOSE=true
    relpath_check "$@"
fi
share|improve this answer
#!/bin/sh

# Return relative path from canonical absolute dir path $1 to canonical
# absolute dir path $2 ($1 and/or $2 may end with one or no "/").
# Does only need POSIX shell builtins (no external command)
relPath () {
    local common path up
    common=${1%/} path=${2%/}/
    while test "${path#"$common"/}" = "$path"; do
        common=${common%/*} up=../$up
    done
    path=$up${path#"$common"/}; path=${path%/}; printf %s "${path:-.}"
}

# Return relative path from dir $1 to dir $2 (Does not impose any
# restrictions on $1 and $2 but requires GNU Core Utility "readlink"
# HINT: busybox's "readlink" does not support option '-m', only '-f'
#       which requires that all but the last path component must exist)
relpath () { relPath "$(readlink -m "$1")" "$(readlink -m "$2")"; }

Above shell script was inspired by pini's (Thanks!). It triggers a bug in the syntax highlighting module of Stack Overflow (at least in my preview frame). So please ignore if highlighting is incorrect.

Some notes:

  • Removed errors and improved code without significantly increasing code length and complexity
  • Put functionality into functions for easiness of use
  • Kept functions POSIX compatible so that they (should) work with all POSIX shells (tested with dash, bash, and zsh in Ubuntu Linux 12.04)
  • Used local variables only to avoid clobbering global variables and polluting the global name space
  • Both directory paths DO NOT need to exist (requirement for my application)
  • Pathnames may contain spaces, special characters, control characters, backslashes, tabs, ', ", ?, *, [, ], etc.
  • Core function "relPath" uses POSIX shell builtins only but requires canonical absolute directory paths as parameters
  • Extended function "relpath" can handle arbitrary directory paths (also relative, non-canonical) but requires external GNU core utility "readlink"
  • Avoided builtin "echo" and used builtin "printf" instead for two reasons:
  • To avoid unnecessary conversions, pathnames are used as they are returned and expected by shell and OS utilities (e.g. cd, ln, ls, find, mkdir; unlike python's "os.path.relpath" which will interpret some backslash sequences)
  • Except for the mentioned backslash sequences the last line of function "relPath" outputs pathnames compatible to python:

    path=$up${path#"$common"/}; path=${path%/}; printf %s "${path:-.}"
    

    Last line can be replaced (and simplified) by line

    printf %s "$up${path#"$common"/}"
    

    I prefer the latter because

    1. Filenames can be directly appended to dir paths obtained by relPath, e.g.:

      ln -s "$(relpath "<fromDir>" "<toDir>")<file>" "<fromDir>"
      
    2. Symbolic links in the same dir created with this method do not have the ugly "./" prepended to the filename.

  • If you find an error please contact linuxball (at) gmail.com and I'll try to fix it.
  • Added regression test suite (also POSIX shell compatible)

Code listing for regression tests (simply append it to the shell script):

############################################################################
# If called with 2 arguments assume they are dir paths and print rel. path #
############################################################################

test "$#" = 2 && {
    printf '%s\n' "Rel. path from '$1' to '$2' is '$(relpath "$1" "$2")'."
    exit 0
}

#######################################################
# If NOT called with 2 arguments run regression tests #
#######################################################

format="\t%-19s %-22s %-27s %-8s %-8s %-8s\n"
printf \
"\n\n*** Testing own and python's function with canonical absolute dirs\n\n"
printf "$format\n" \
    "From Directory" "To Directory" "Rel. Path" "relPath" "relpath" "python"
IFS=
while read -r p; do
    eval set -- $p
    case $1 in '#'*|'') continue;; esac # Skip comments and empty lines
    # q stores quoting character, use " if ' is used in path name
    q="'"; case $1$2 in *"'"*) q='"';; esac
    rPOk=passed rP=$(relPath "$1" "$2"); test "$rP" = "$3" || rPOk=$rP
    rpOk=passed rp=$(relpath "$1" "$2"); test "$rp" = "$3" || rpOk=$rp
    RPOk=passed
    RP=$(python -c "import os.path; print os.path.relpath($q$2$q, $q$1$q)")
    test "$RP" = "$3" || RPOk=$RP
    printf \
    "$format" "$q$1$q" "$q$2$q" "$q$3$q" "$q$rPOk$q" "$q$rpOk$q" "$q$RPOk$q"
done <<-"EOF"
    # From directory    To directory           Expected relative path

    '/'                 '/'                    '.'
    '/usr'              '/'                    '..'
    '/usr/'             '/'                    '..'
    '/'                 '/usr'                 'usr'
    '/'                 '/usr/'                'usr'
    '/usr'              '/usr'                 '.'
    '/usr/'             '/usr'                 '.'
    '/usr'              '/usr/'                '.'
    '/usr/'             '/usr/'                '.'
    '/u'                '/usr'                 '../usr'
    '/usr'              '/u'                   '../u'
    "/u'/dir"           "/u'/dir"              "."
    "/u'"               "/u'/dir"              "dir"
    "/u'/dir"           "/u'"                  ".."
    "/"                 "/u'/dir"              "u'/dir"
    "/u'/dir"           "/"                    "../.."
    "/u'"               "/u'"                  "."
    "/"                 "/u'"                  "u'"
    "/u'"               "/"                    ".."
    '/u"/dir'           '/u"/dir'              '.'
    '/u"'               '/u"/dir'              'dir'
    '/u"/dir'           '/u"'                  '..'
    '/'                 '/u"/dir'              'u"/dir'
    '/u"/dir'           '/'                    '../..'
    '/u"'               '/u"'                  '.'
    '/'                 '/u"'                  'u"'
    '/u"'               '/'                    '..'
    '/u /dir'           '/u /dir'              '.'
    '/u '               '/u /dir'              'dir'
    '/u /dir'           '/u '                  '..'
    '/'                 '/u /dir'              'u /dir'
    '/u /dir'           '/'                    '../..'
    '/u '               '/u '                  '.'
    '/'                 '/u '                  'u '
    '/u '               '/'                    '..'
    '/u\n/dir'          '/u\n/dir'             '.'
    '/u\n'              '/u\n/dir'             'dir'
    '/u\n/dir'          '/u\n'                 '..'
    '/'                 '/u\n/dir'             'u\n/dir'
    '/u\n/dir'          '/'                    '../..'
    '/u\n'              '/u\n'                 '.'
    '/'                 '/u\n'                 'u\n'
    '/u\n'              '/'                    '..'

    '/    a   b/å/⮀*/!' '/    a   b/å/⮀/xäå/?' '../../⮀/xäå/?'
    '/'                 '/A'                   'A'
    '/A'                '/'                    '..'
    '/  & /  !/*/\\/E'  '/'                    '../../../../..'
    '/'                 '/  & /  !/*/\\/E'     '  & /  !/*/\\/E'
    '/  & /  !/*/\\/E'  '/  & /  !/?/\\/E/F'   '../../../?/\\/E/F'
    '/X/Y'              '/  & /  !/C/\\/E/F'   '../../  & /  !/C/\\/E/F'
    '/  & /  !/C'       '/A'                   '../../../A'
    '/A /  !/C'         '/A /B'                '../../B'
    '/Â/  !/C'          '/Â/  !/C'             '.'
    '/  & /B / C'       '/  & /B / C/D'        'D'
    '/  & /  !/C'       '/  & /  !/C/\\/Ê'     '\\/Ê'
    '/Å/  !/C'          '/Å/  !/D'             '../D'
    '/.A /*B/C'         '/.A /*B/\\/E'         '../\\/E'
    '/  & /  !/C'       '/  & /D'              '../../D'
    '/  & /  !/C'       '/  & /\\/E'           '../../\\/E'
    '/  & /  !/C'       '/\\/E/F'              '../../../\\/E/F'
    '/home/p1/p2'       '/home/p1/p3'          '../p3'
    '/home/p1/p2'       '/home/p4/p5'          '../../p4/p5'
    '/home/p1/p2'       '/work/p6/p7'          '../../../work/p6/p7'
    '/home/p1'          '/work/p1/p2/p3/p4'    '../../work/p1/p2/p3/p4'
    '/home'             '/work/p2/p3'          '../work/p2/p3'
    '/'                 '/work/p2/p3/p4'       'work/p2/p3/p4'
    '/home/p1/p2'       '/home/p1/p2/p3/p4'    'p3/p4'
    '/home/p1/p2'       '/home/p1/p2/p3'       'p3'
    '/home/p1/p2'       '/home/p1/p2'          '.'
    '/home/p1/p2'       '/home/p1'             '..'
    '/home/p1/p2'       '/home'                '../..'
    '/home/p1/p2'       '/'                    '../../..'
    '/home/p1/p2'       '/work'                '../../../work'
    '/home/p1/p2'       '/work/p1'             '../../../work/p1'
    '/home/p1/p2'       '/work/p1/p2'          '../../../work/p1/p2'
    '/home/p1/p2'       '/work/p1/p2/p3'       '../../../work/p1/p2/p3'
    '/home/p1/p2'       '/work/p1/p2/p3/p4'    '../../../work/p1/p2/p3/p4'

    '/-'                '/-'                   '.'
    '/?'                '/?'                   '.'
    '/??'               '/??'                  '.'
    '/???'              '/???'                 '.'
    '/?*'               '/?*'                  '.'
    '/*'                '/*'                   '.'
    '/*'                '/**'                  '../**'
    '/*'                '/***'                 '../***'
    '/*.*'              '/*.**'                '../*.**'
    '/*.???'            '/*.??'                '../*.??'
    '/[]'               '/[]'                  '.'
    '/[a-z]*'           '/[0-9]*'              '../[0-9]*'
EOF


format="\t%-19s %-22s %-27s %-8s %-8s\n"
printf "\n\n*** Testing own and python's function with arbitrary dirs\n\n"
printf "$format\n" \
    "From Directory" "To Directory" "Rel. Path" "relpath" "python"
IFS=
while read -r p; do
    eval set -- $p
    case $1 in '#'*|'') continue;; esac # Skip comments and empty lines
    # q stores quoting character, use " if ' is used in path name
    q="'"; case $1$2 in *"'"*) q='"';; esac
    rpOk=passed rp=$(relpath "$1" "$2"); test "$rp" = "$3" || rpOk=$rp
    RPOk=passed
    RP=$(python -c "import os.path; print os.path.relpath($q$2$q, $q$1$q)")
    test "$RP" = "$3" || RPOk=$RP
    printf "$format" "$q$1$q" "$q$2$q" "$q$3$q" "$q$rpOk$q" "$q$RPOk$q"
done <<-"EOF"
    # From directory    To directory           Expected relative path

    'usr/p1/..//./p4'   'p3/../p1/p6/.././/p2' '../../p1/p2'
    './home/../../work' '..//././../dir///'    '../../dir'

    'home/p1/p2'        'home/p1/p3'           '../p3'
    'home/p1/p2'        'home/p4/p5'           '../../p4/p5'
    'home/p1/p2'        'work/p6/p7'           '../../../work/p6/p7'
    'home/p1'           'work/p1/p2/p3/p4'     '../../work/p1/p2/p3/p4'
    'home'              'work/p2/p3'           '../work/p2/p3'
    '.'                 'work/p2/p3'           'work/p2/p3'
    'home/p1/p2'        'home/p1/p2/p3/p4'     'p3/p4'
    'home/p1/p2'        'home/p1/p2/p3'        'p3'
    'home/p1/p2'        'home/p1/p2'           '.'
    'home/p1/p2'        'home/p1'              '..'
    'home/p1/p2'        'home'                 '../..'
    'home/p1/p2'        '.'                    '../../..'
    'home/p1/p2'        'work'                 '../../../work'
    'home/p1/p2'        'work/p1'              '../../../work/p1'
    'home/p1/p2'        'work/p1/p2'           '../../../work/p1/p2'
    'home/p1/p2'        'work/p1/p2/p3'        '../../../work/p1/p2/p3'
    'home/p1/p2'        'work/p1/p2/p3/p4'     '../../../work/p1/p2/p3/p4'
EOF
share|improve this answer

This script gives correct results only for inputs that are absolute paths or relative paths without . or ..:

#!/bin/bash

# usage: relpath from to

if [[ "$1" == "$2" ]]
then
    echo "."
    exit
fi

IFS="/"

current=($1)
absolute=($2)

abssize=${#absolute[@]}
cursize=${#current[@]}

while [[ ${absolute[level]} == ${current[level]} ]]
do
    (( level++ ))
    if (( level > abssize || level > cursize ))
    then
        break
    fi
done

for ((i = level; i < cursize; i++))
do
    if ((i > level))
    then
        newpath=$newpath"/"
    fi
    newpath=$newpath".."
done

for ((i = level; i < abssize; i++))
do
    if [[ -n $newpath ]]
    then
        newpath=$newpath"/"
    fi
    newpath=$newpath${absolute[i]}
done

echo "$newpath"
share|improve this answer
1  
This appears to work. If the directories actually exist, use of $(readlink -f $1) and $(readlink -f $2) on the inputs can fix the problem where "." or ".." appears in the inputs. This can cause some trouble if the directories don't actually exist. –  Dr. Person Person II Jul 23 '11 at 13:30

I would just use Perl for this not-so-trivial task:

absolute="/foo/bar"
current="/foo/baz/foo"

# Perl is magic
relative=$(perl -MFile::Spec -e 'print File::Spec->abs2rel("'$absolute'","'$current'")')
share|improve this answer
1  
+1, but would recommend: perl -MFile::Spec -e "print File::Spec->abs2rel('$absolute','$current')" so that absolute and current are quoted. –  William Pursell Aug 17 at 13:41

A slight improvement on kasku's and Pini's answers, which plays nicer with spaces and allows passing relative paths:

#!/bin/bash
# both $1 and $2 are paths
# returns $2 relative to $1
absolute=`readlink -f "$2"`
current=`readlink -f "$1"`
# Perl is magic
# Quoting horror.... spaces cause problems, that's why we need the extra " in here:
relative=$(perl -MFile::Spec -e "print File::Spec->abs2rel(q($absolute),q($current))")

echo $relative
share|improve this answer

Built in to perl since 2001, so it works on nearly every system you can imagine, even VMS.

perl -e 'use File::Spec; print File::Spec->abs2rel(@ARGV) . "\n"' FILE BASE

Also, the solution is easy to understand.

So for your example:

perl -e 'use File::Spec; print File::Spec->abs2rel(@ARGV) . "\n"' $absolute $current

...would work fine.

share|improve this answer
2  
Plus perl's nicer than python. –  Erik Aronesty Jun 14 '13 at 14:16
1  
say has not been available in perl for as log, but it could be used effectively here. perl -MFile::Spec -E 'say File::Spec->abs2rel(@ARGV)' –  William Pursell Aug 17 at 13:45
    
+1 but see also this similar answer which is older (Feb 2012). Read also the pertinent comments from William Pursell. My version are two command lines: perl -MFile::Spec -e 'print File::Spec->abs2rel(@ARGV)' "$target" and perl -MFile::Spec -e 'print File::Spec->abs2rel(@ARGV)' "$target" "$origin". The first one-line perl script uses one argument (origin is current working directory). The second one-line perl script uses two arguments. –  olibre Oct 1 at 17:03

Presuming that you have installed: bash, pwd, dirname, echo; then relpath is

#!/bin/bash
s=$(cd ${1%%/};pwd); d=$(cd $2;pwd); while [ "${d#$s/}" == "${d}" ]
do s=$(dirname $s);b="../${b}"; done; echo ${b}${d#$s/}

I've golfed the answer from pini and a few other ideas

share|improve this answer
    
ideal answer: works with /bin/sh, does not require readlink, python, perl -> great for light/embedded systems or windows bash console –  Francois Oct 28 at 13:57

Sadly, Mark Rushakoff's answer (now deleted - it referenced the code from here) does not seem to work correctly when adapted to:

source=/home/part2/part3/part4
target=/work/proj1/proj2

The thinking outlined in the commentary can be refined to make it work correctly for most cases. I'm about to assume that the script takes a source argument (where you are) and a target argument (where you want to get to), and that either both are absolute pathnames or both are relative. If one is absolute and the other relative, the easiest thing is to prefix the relative name with the current working directory - but the code below does not do that.


Beware

The code below is close to working correctly, but is not quite right.

  1. There is the problem addressed in the comments from Dennis Williamson.
  2. There is also a problem that this purely textual processing of pathnames and you can be seriously messed up by weird symlinks.
  3. The code does not handle stray 'dots' in paths like 'xyz/./pqr'.
  4. The code does not handle stray 'double dots' in paths like 'xyz/../pqr'.
  5. Trivially: the code does not remove leading './' from paths.

Dennis's code is better because it fixes 1 and 5 - but has the same issues 2, 3, 4. Use Dennis's code (and up-vote it ahead of this) because of that.

(NB: POSIX provides a system call realpath() that resolves pathnames so that there are no symlinks left in them. Applying that to the input names, and then using Dennis's code would give the correct answer each time. It is trivial to write the C code that wraps realpath() - I've done it - but I don't know of a standard utility that does so.)


For this, I find Perl easier to use than shell, though bash has decent support for arrays and could probably do this too - exercise for the reader. So, given two compatible names, split them each into components:

  • Set the relative path to empty.
  • While the components are the same, skip to the next.
  • When corresponding components are different or there are no more components for one path:
  • If there are no remaining source components and the relative path is empty, add "." to the start.
  • For each remaining source component, prefix the relative path with "../".
  • If there are no remaining target components and the relative path is empty, add "." to the start.
  • For each remaining target component, add the component to the end of the path after a slash.

Thus:

#!/bin/perl -w

use strict;

# Should fettle the arguments if one is absolute and one relative:
# Oops - missing functionality!

# Split!
my(@source) = split '/', $ARGV[0];
my(@target) = split '/', $ARGV[1];

my $count = scalar(@source);
   $count = scalar(@target) if (scalar(@target) < $count);
my $relpath = "";

my $i;
for ($i = 0; $i < $count; $i++)
{
    last if $source[$i] ne $target[$i];
}

$relpath = "." if ($i >= scalar(@source) && $relpath eq "");
for (my $s = $i; $s < scalar(@source); $s++)
{
    $relpath = "../$relpath";
}
$relpath = "." if ($i >= scalar(@target) && $relpath eq "");
for (my $t = $i; $t < scalar(@target); $t++)
{
    $relpath .= "/$target[$t]";
}

# Clean up result (remove double slash, trailing slash, trailing slash-dot).
$relpath =~ s%//%/%;
$relpath =~ s%/$%%;
$relpath =~ s%/\.$%%;

print "source  = $ARGV[0]\n";
print "target  = $ARGV[1]\n";
print "relpath = $relpath\n";

Test script (the square brackets contain a blank and a tab):

sed 's/#.*//;/^[    ]*$/d' <<! |

/home/part1/part2 /home/part1/part3
/home/part1/part2 /home/part4/part5
/home/part1/part2 /work/part6/part7
/home/part1       /work/part1/part2/part3/part4
/home             /work/part2/part3
/                 /work/part2/part3/part4

/home/part1/part2 /home/part1/part2/part3/part4
/home/part1/part2 /home/part1/part2/part3
/home/part1/part2 /home/part1/part2
/home/part1/part2 /home/part1
/home/part1/part2 /home
/home/part1/part2 /

/home/part1/part2 /work
/home/part1/part2 /work/part1
/home/part1/part2 /work/part1/part2
/home/part1/part2 /work/part1/part2/part3
/home/part1/part2 /work/part1/part2/part3/part4

home/part1/part2 home/part1/part3
home/part1/part2 home/part4/part5
home/part1/part2 work/part6/part7
home/part1       work/part1/part2/part3/part4
home             work/part2/part3
.                work/part2/part3

home/part1/part2 home/part1/part2/part3/part4
home/part1/part2 home/part1/part2/part3
home/part1/part2 home/part1/part2
home/part1/part2 home/part1
home/part1/part2 home
home/part1/part2 .

home/part1/part2 work
home/part1/part2 work/part1
home/part1/part2 work/part1/part2
home/part1/part2 work/part1/part2/part3
home/part1/part2 work/part1/part2/part3/part4

!

while read source target
do
    perl relpath.pl $source $target
    echo
done

Output from the test script:

source  = /home/part1/part2
target  = /home/part1/part3
relpath = ../part3

source  = /home/part1/part2
target  = /home/part4/part5
relpath = ../../part4/part5

source  = /home/part1/part2
target  = /work/part6/part7
relpath = ../../../work/part6/part7

source  = /home/part1
target  = /work/part1/part2/part3/part4
relpath = ../../work/part1/part2/part3/part4

source  = /home
target  = /work/part2/part3
relpath = ../work/part2/part3

source  = /
target  = /work/part2/part3/part4
relpath = ./work/part2/part3/part4

source  = /home/part1/part2
target  = /home/part1/part2/part3/part4
relpath = ./part3/part4

source  = /home/part1/part2
target  = /home/part1/part2/part3
relpath = ./part3

source  = /home/part1/part2
target  = /home/part1/part2
relpath = .

source  = /home/part1/part2
target  = /home/part1
relpath = ..

source  = /home/part1/part2
target  = /home
relpath = ../..

source  = /home/part1/part2
target  = /
relpath = ../../../..

source  = /home/part1/part2
target  = /work
relpath = ../../../work

source  = /home/part1/part2
target  = /work/part1
relpath = ../../../work/part1

source  = /home/part1/part2
target  = /work/part1/part2
relpath = ../../../work/part1/part2

source  = /home/part1/part2
target  = /work/part1/part2/part3
relpath = ../../../work/part1/part2/part3

source  = /home/part1/part2
target  = /work/part1/part2/part3/part4
relpath = ../../../work/part1/part2/part3/part4

source  = home/part1/part2
target  = home/part1/part3
relpath = ../part3

source  = home/part1/part2
target  = home/part4/part5
relpath = ../../part4/part5

source  = home/part1/part2
target  = work/part6/part7
relpath = ../../../work/part6/part7

source  = home/part1
target  = work/part1/part2/part3/part4
relpath = ../../work/part1/part2/part3/part4

source  = home
target  = work/part2/part3
relpath = ../work/part2/part3

source  = .
target  = work/part2/part3
relpath = ../work/part2/part3

source  = home/part1/part2
target  = home/part1/part2/part3/part4
relpath = ./part3/part4

source  = home/part1/part2
target  = home/part1/part2/part3
relpath = ./part3

source  = home/part1/part2
target  = home/part1/part2
relpath = .

source  = home/part1/part2
target  = home/part1
relpath = ..

source  = home/part1/part2
target  = home
relpath = ../..

source  = home/part1/part2
target  = .
relpath = ../../..

source  = home/part1/part2
target  = work
relpath = ../../../work

source  = home/part1/part2
target  = work/part1
relpath = ../../../work/part1

source  = home/part1/part2
target  = work/part1/part2
relpath = ../../../work/part1/part2

source  = home/part1/part2
target  = work/part1/part2/part3
relpath = ../../../work/part1/part2/part3

source  = home/part1/part2
target  = work/part1/part2/part3/part4
relpath = ../../../work/part1/part2/part3/part4

This Perl script works fairly thoroughly on Unix (it does not take into account all the complexities of Windows path names) in the face of weird inputs. It uses the module Cwd and its function realpath to resolve the real path of names that exist, and does a textual analysis for paths that don't exist. In all cases except one, it produces the same output as Dennis's script. The deviant case is:

source   = home/part1/part2
target   = .
relpath1 = ../../..
relpath2 = ../../../.

The two results are equivalent - just not identical. (The output is from a mildly modified version of the test script - the Perl script below simply prints the answer, rather than the inputs and the answer as in the script above.) Now: should I eliminate the non-working answer? Maybe...

#!/bin/perl -w
# Based loosely on code from: http://unix.derkeiler.com/Newsgroups/comp.unix.shell/2005-10/1256.html
# Via: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2564634

use strict;

die "Usage: $0 from to\n" if scalar @ARGV != 2;

use Cwd qw(realpath getcwd);

my $pwd;
my $verbose = 0;

# Fettle filename so it is absolute.
# Deals with '//', '/./' and '/../' notations, plus symlinks.
# The realpath() function does the hard work if the path exists.
# For non-existent paths, the code does a purely textual hack.
sub resolve
{
    my($name) = @_;
    my($path) = realpath($name);
    if (!defined $path)
    {
        # Path does not exist - do the best we can with lexical analysis
        # Assume Unix - not dealing with Windows.
        $path = $name;
        if ($name !~ m%^/%)
        {
            $pwd = getcwd if !defined $pwd;
            $path = "$pwd/$path";
        }
        $path =~ s%//+%/%g;     # Not UNC paths.
        $path =~ s%/$%%;        # No trailing /
        $path =~ s%/\./%/%g;    # No embedded /./
        # Try to eliminate /../abc/
        $path =~ s%/\.\./(?:[^/]+)(/|$)%$1%g;
        $path =~ s%/\.$%%;      # No trailing /.
        $path =~ s%^\./%%;      # No leading ./
        # What happens with . and / as inputs?
    }
    return($path);
}

sub print_result
{
    my($source, $target, $relpath) = @_;
    if ($verbose)
    {
        print "source  = $ARGV[0]\n";
        print "target  = $ARGV[1]\n";
        print "relpath = $relpath\n";
    }
    else
    {
        print "$relpath\n";
    }
    exit 0;
}

my($source) = resolve($ARGV[0]);
my($target) = resolve($ARGV[1]);
print_result($source, $target, ".") if ($source eq $target);

# Split!
my(@source) = split '/', $source;
my(@target) = split '/', $target;

my $count = scalar(@source);
   $count = scalar(@target) if (scalar(@target) < $count);
my $relpath = "";
my $i;

# Both paths are absolute; Perl splits an empty field 0.
for ($i = 1; $i < $count; $i++)
{
    last if $source[$i] ne $target[$i];
}

for (my $s = $i; $s < scalar(@source); $s++)
{
    $relpath = "$relpath/" if ($s > $i);
    $relpath = "$relpath..";
}
for (my $t = $i; $t < scalar(@target); $t++)
{
    $relpath = "$relpath/" if ($relpath ne "");
    $relpath = "$relpath$target[$t]";
}

print_result($source, $target, $relpath);
share|improve this answer
    
Your /home/part1/part2 to / has one too many ../. Otherwise, my script matches your output except mine adds an unnecessary . at the end of the one where the destination is . and I don't use a ./ at the beginning of ones that descend without going up. –  Dennis Williamson Apr 2 '10 at 5:40
    
@Dennis: I spent time going cross-eyed over the results - sometimes I could see that problem, and sometimes I couldn't find it again. Removing a leading './' is of another trivial step. Your comment about 'no embedded . or ..' is also pertinent. It is actually surprisingly difficult to do the job properly - doubly so if any of the names is actually a symlink; we're both doing purely textual analysis. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 2 '10 at 6:28
    
@Dennis: Of course, unless you have Newcastle Connection networking, trying to get above root is futile, so ../../../.. and ../../.. are equivalent. However, that is pure escapism; your criticism is correct. (Newcastle Connection allowed you to configure and use the notation /../host/path/on/remote/machine to get to a different host - a neat scheme. I believe it supported /../../network/host/path/on/remote/network/and/host too. It's on Wikipedia.) –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 2 '10 at 6:31
    
So instead, we now have the double slash of UNC. –  Dennis Williamson Apr 2 '10 at 10:10
1  
The "readlink" utility (at least the GNU version) can do the equivalent of realpath(), if you pass it the "-f" option. For example, on my system, readlink /usr/bin/vi gives /etc/alternatives/vi, but that's another symlink - whereas readlink -f /usr/bin/vi gives /usr/bin/vim.basic, which is the ultimate destination of all the symlinks... –  psmears May 14 '10 at 9:54

My Solution:

computeRelativePath() 
{

    Source=$(readlink -f ${1})
    Target=$(readlink -f ${2})

    local OLDIFS=$IFS
    IFS="/"

    local SourceDirectoryArray=($Source)
    local TargetDirectoryArray=($Target)

    local SourceArrayLength=$(echo ${SourceDirectoryArray[@]} | wc -w)
    local TargetArrayLength=$(echo ${TargetDirectoryArray[@]} | wc -w)

    local Length
    test $SourceArrayLength -gt $TargetArrayLength && Length=$SourceArrayLength || Length=$TargetArrayLength


    local Result=""
    local AppendToEnd=""

    IFS=$OLDIFS

    local i

    for ((i = 0; i <= $Length + 1 ; i++ ))
    do
            if [ "${SourceDirectoryArray[$i]}" = "${TargetDirectoryArray[$i]}" ]
            then
                continue    
            elif [ "${SourceDirectoryArray[$i]}" != "" ] && [ "${TargetDirectoryArray[$i]}" != "" ] 
            then
                AppendToEnd="${AppendToEnd}${TargetDirectoryArray[${i}]}/"
                Result="${Result}../"               

            elif [ "${SourceDirectoryArray[$i]}" = "" ]
            then
                Result="${Result}${TargetDirectoryArray[${i}]}/"
            else
                Result="${Result}../"
            fi
    done

    Result="${Result}${AppendToEnd}"

    echo $Result

}
share|improve this answer
    
This is Extrememly Portable :) –  Anonymous Oct 31 '11 at 18:30
    
+1 for the readlink -s –  Offirmo Sep 19 '12 at 15:54

test.sh:

#!/bin/bash                                                                 

cd /home/ubuntu
touch blah
TEST=/home/ubuntu/.//blah
echo TEST=$TEST
TMP=$(readlink -e "$TEST")
echo TMP=$TMP
REL=${TMP#$(pwd)/}
echo REL=$REL

Testing:

$ ./test.sh 
TEST=/home/ubuntu/.//blah
TMP=/home/ubuntu/blah
REL=blah
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for compactness and bash-ness. You should, however, also call readlink on $(pwd). –  DevSolar Nov 29 '10 at 16:06
2  
Relative does not mean file has to be placed in the same directory. –  greenoldman Mar 26 '11 at 15:47
    
although the original question doesn't provide a lot of testcases, this script fails for simple tests like finding the relative path from /home/user1 to /home/user2 (correct answer: ../user2). The script by pini/jcwenger works for this case. –  michael_n Mar 28 '12 at 22:15

I took your question as a challenge to write this in "portable" shell code, i.e.

  • with a POSIX shell in mind
  • no bashisms such as arrays
  • avoid calling externals like the plague. There's not a single fork in the script! That makes it blazingly fast, especially on systems with significant fork overhead, like cygwin.
  • Must deal with glob characters in pathnames (*, ?, [, ])

It runs on any POSIX conformant shell (zsh, bash, ksh, ash, busybox, ...). It even contains a testsuite to verify its operation. Canonicalization of pathnames is left as an exercise. :-)

#!/bin/sh

# Find common parent directory path for a pair of paths.
# Call with two pathnames as args, e.g.
# commondirpart foo/bar foo/baz/bat -> result="foo/"
# The result is either empty or ends with "/".
commondirpart () {
   result=""
   while test ${#1} -gt 0 -a ${#2} -gt 0; do
      if test "${1%${1#?}}" != "${2%${2#?}}"; then   # First characters the same?
         break                                       # No, we're done comparing.
      fi
      result="$result${1%${1#?}}"                    # Yes, append to result.
      set -- "${1#?}" "${2#?}"                       # Chop first char off both strings.
   done
   case "$result" in
   (""|*/) ;;
   (*)     result="${result%/*}/";;
   esac
}

# Turn foo/bar/baz into ../../..
#
dir2dotdot () {
   OLDIFS="$IFS" IFS="/" result=""
   for dir in $1; do
      result="$result../"
   done
   result="${result%/}"
   IFS="$OLDIFS"
}

# Call with FROM TO args.
relativepath () {
   case "$1" in
   (*//*|*/./*|*/../*|*?/|*/.|*/..)
      printf '%s\n' "'$1' not canonical"; exit 1;;
   (/*)
      from="${1#?}";;
   (*)
      printf '%s\n' "'$1' not absolute"; exit 1;;
   esac
   case "$2" in
   (*//*|*/./*|*/../*|*?/|*/.|*/..)
      printf '%s\n' "'$2' not canonical"; exit 1;;
   (/*)
      to="${2#?}";;
   (*)
      printf '%s\n' "'$2' not absolute"; exit 1;;
   esac

   case "$to" in
   ("$from")   # Identical directories.
      result=".";;
   ("$from"/*) # From /x to /x/foo/bar -> foo/bar
      result="${to##$from/}";;
   ("")        # From /foo/bar to / -> ../..
      dir2dotdot "$from";;
   (*)
      case "$from" in
      ("$to"/*)       # From /x/foo/bar to /x -> ../..
         dir2dotdot "${from##$to/}";;
      (*)             # Everything else.
         commondirpart "$from" "$to"
         common="$result"
         dir2dotdot "${from#$common}"
         result="$result/${to#$common}"
      esac
      ;;
   esac
}

set -f # noglob

set -x
cat <<EOF |
/ / .
/- /- .
/? /? .
/?? /?? .
/??? /??? .
/?* /?* .
/* /* .
/* /** ../**
/* /*** ../***
/*.* /*.** ../*.**
/*.??? /*.?? ../*.??
/[] /[] .
/[a-z]* /[0-9]* ../[0-9]*
/foo /foo .
/foo / ..
/foo/bar / ../..
/foo/bar /foo ..
/foo/bar /foo/baz ../baz
/foo/bar /bar/foo  ../../bar/foo
/foo/bar/baz /gnarf/blurfl/blubb ../../../gnarf/blurfl/blubb
/foo/bar/baz /gnarf ../../../gnarf
/foo/bar/baz /foo/baz ../../baz
/foo. /bar. ../bar.
EOF
while read FROM TO VIA; do
   relativepath "$FROM" "$TO"
   printf '%s\n' "FROM: $FROM" "TO:   $TO" "VIA:  $result"
   if test "$result" != "$VIA"; then
      printf '%s\n' "OOOPS! Expected '$VIA' but got '$result'"
   fi
done

# vi: set tabstop=3 shiftwidth=3 expandtab fileformat=unix :
share|improve this answer

Guess this one shall do the trick too... (comes with built-in tests) :)

OK, some overhead expected, but we're doing Bourne shell here! ;)

#!/bin/sh

#
# Finding the relative path to a certain file ($2), given the absolute path ($1)
# (available here too http://pastebin.com/tWWqA8aB)
#
relpath () {
  local  FROM="$1"
  local    TO="`dirname  $2`"
  local  FILE="`basename $2`"
  local  DEBUG="$3"

  local FROMREL=""
  local FROMUP="$FROM"
  while [ "$FROMUP" != "/" ]; do
    local TOUP="$TO"
    local TOREL=""
    while [ "$TOUP" != "/" ]; do
      [ -z "$DEBUG" ] || echo 1>&2 "$DEBUG$FROMUP =?= $TOUP"
      if [ "$FROMUP" = "$TOUP" ]; then
        echo "${FROMREL:-.}/$TOREL${TOREL:+/}$FILE"
        return 0
      fi
      TOREL="`basename $TOUP`${TOREL:+/}$TOREL"
      TOUP="`dirname $TOUP`"
    done
    FROMREL="..${FROMREL:+/}$FROMREL"
    FROMUP="`dirname $FROMUP`"
  done
  echo "${FROMREL:-.}${TOREL:+/}$TOREL/$FILE"
  return 0
}

relpathshow () {
  echo " - target $2"
  echo "   from   $1"
  echo "   ------"
  echo "   => `relpath $1 $2 '      '`"
  echo ""
}

# If given 2 arguments, do as said...
if [ -n "$2" ]; then
  relpath $1 $2

# If only one given, then assume current directory
elif [ -n "$1" ]; then
  relpath `pwd` $1

# Otherwise perform a set of built-in tests to confirm the validity of the method! ;)
else

  relpathshow /usr/share/emacs22/site-lisp/emacs-goodies-el \
              /usr/share/emacs22/site-lisp/emacs-goodies-el/filladapt.el

  relpathshow /usr/share/emacs23/site-lisp/emacs-goodies-el \
              /usr/share/emacs22/site-lisp/emacs-goodies-el/filladapt.el

  relpathshow /usr/bin \
              /usr/share/emacs22/site-lisp/emacs-goodies-el/filladapt.el

  relpathshow /usr/bin \
              /usr/share/emacs22/site-lisp/emacs-goodies-el/filladapt.el

  relpathshow /usr/bin/share/emacs22/site-lisp/emacs-goodies-el \
              /etc/motd

  relpathshow / \
              /initrd.img
fi
share|improve this answer

This script works only on the path names. It does not require any of the files to exist. If the paths passed are not absolute, the behavior is a bit unusual, but should work as expected if both paths are relative.

I only tested it on OSX, so it might not be portable.

#!/bin/bash
set -e
declare SCRIPT_NAME="$(basename $0)"
function usage {
    echo "Usage: $SCRIPT_NAME <base path> <target file>"
    echo "       Outputs <target file> relative to <base path>"
    exit 1
}

if [ $# -lt 2 ]; then usage; fi

declare base=$1
declare target=$2
declare -a base_part=()
declare -a target_part=()

#Split path elements & canonicalize
OFS="$IFS"; IFS='/'
bpl=0;
for bp in $base; do
    case "$bp" in
        ".");;
        "..") let "bpl=$bpl-1" ;;
        *) base_part[${bpl}]="$bp" ; let "bpl=$bpl+1";;
    esac
done
tpl=0;
for tp in $target; do
    case "$tp" in
        ".");;
        "..") let "tpl=$tpl-1" ;;
        *) target_part[${tpl}]="$tp" ; let "tpl=$tpl+1";;
    esac
done
IFS="$OFS"

#Count common prefix
common=0
for (( i=0 ; i<$bpl ; i++ )); do
    if [ "${base_part[$i]}" = "${target_part[$common]}" ] ; then
        let "common=$common+1"
    else
        break   
    fi
done

#Compute number of directories up
let "updir=$bpl-$common" || updir=0 #if the expression is zero, 'let' fails

#trivial case (after canonical decomposition)
if [ $updir -eq 0 ]; then
    echo .
    exit
fi

#Print updirs
for (( i=0 ; i<$updir ; i++ )); do
    echo -n ../
done

#Print remaining path
for (( i=$common ; i<$tpl ; i++ )); do
    if [ $i -ne $common ]; then
        echo -n "/"
    fi
    if [ "" != "${target_part[$i]}" ] ; then
        echo -n "${target_part[$i]}"
    fi
done
#One last newline
echo
share|improve this answer
    
Also, the code is a bit copy & paste-ish, but I needed this rather quickly. –  juancn Dec 6 '10 at 20:25

Here's a shell script that does it without calling other programs:

#! /bin/env bash 

#bash script to find the relative path between two directories

mydir=${0%/}
mydir=${0%/*}
creadlink="$mydir/creadlink"

shopt -s extglob

relpath_ () {
        path1=$("$creadlink" "$1")
        path2=$("$creadlink" "$2")
        orig1=$path1
        path1=${path1%/}/
        path2=${path2%/}/

        while :; do
                if test ! "$path1"; then
                        break
                fi
                part1=${path2#$path1}
                if test "${part1#/}" = "$part1"; then
                        path1=${path1%/*}
                        continue
                fi
                if test "${path2#$path1}" = "$path2"; then
                        path1=${path1%/*}
                        continue
                fi
                break
        done
        part1=$path1
        path1=${orig1#$part1}
        depth=${path1//+([^\/])/..}
        path1=${path2#$path1}
        path1=${depth}${path2#$part1}
        path1=${path1##+(\/)}
        path1=${path1%/}
        if test ! "$path1"; then
                path1=.
        fi
        printf "$path1"

}

relpath_test () {
        res=$(relpath_ /path1/to/dir1 /path1/to/dir2 )
        expected='../dir2'
        test_results "$res" "$expected"

        res=$(relpath_ / /path1/to/dir2 )
        expected='path1/to/dir2'
        test_results "$res" "$expected"

        res=$(relpath_ /path1/to/dir2 / )
        expected='../../..'
        test_results "$res" "$expected"

        res=$(relpath_ / / )
        expected='.'
        test_results "$res" "$expected"

        res=$(relpath_ /path/to/dir2/dir3 /path/to/dir1/dir4/dir4a )
        expected='../../dir1/dir4/dir4a'
        test_results "$res" "$expected"

        res=$(relpath_ /path/to/dir1/dir4/dir4a /path/to/dir2/dir3 )
        expected='../../../dir2/dir3'
        test_results "$res" "$expected"

        #res=$(relpath_ . /path/to/dir2/dir3 )
        #expected='../../../dir2/dir3'
        #test_results "$res" "$expected"
}

test_results () {
        if test ! "$1" = "$2"; then
                printf 'failed!\nresult:\nX%sX\nexpected:\nX%sX\n\n' "$@"
        fi
}

#relpath_test

source: http://www.ynform.org/w/Pub/Relpath

share|improve this answer
1  
This is not really portable due to the use of the ${param/pattern/subst} construct, which is not POSIX (as of 2011). –  Jens Aug 11 '11 at 11:57
    
The referenced source ynform.org/w/Pub/Relpath points to a completely garbled wiki page containing the script contents several times, intermingled with vi tilde lines, error messages about commands not found and whatnot. Utterly useless for someone researching the original. –  Jens Aug 11 '11 at 15:02
    
wiki page is now fixed –  Poor Yorick Sep 8 '11 at 12:38

I needed something like this but which resolved symbolic links too. I discovered that pwd has a -P flag for that purpose. A fragment of my script is appended. It's within a function in a shell script, hence the $1 and $2. The result value, which is the relative path from START_ABS to END_ABS, is in the UPDIRS variable. The script cd's into each parameter directory in order to execute the pwd -P and this also means that relative path parameters are handled. Cheers, Jim

SAVE_DIR="$PWD"
cd "$1"
START_ABS=`pwd -P`
cd "$SAVE_DIR"
cd "$2"
END_ABS=`pwd -P`

START_WORK="$START_ABS"
UPDIRS=""

while test -n "${START_WORK}" -a "${END_ABS/#${START_WORK}}" '==' "$END_ABS";
do
    START_WORK=`dirname "$START_WORK"`"/"
    UPDIRS=${UPDIRS}"../"
done
UPDIRS="$UPDIRS${END_ABS/#${START_WORK}}"
cd "$SAVE_DIR"
share|improve this answer

Yet another solution, pure bash + GNU readlink for easy use in following context:

ln -s "$(relpath "$A" "$B")" "$B"

Edit: Make sure that "$B" is either not existing or no softlink in that case, else relpath follows this link which is not what you want!

This works in nearly all current Linux. If readlink -m does not work at your side, try readlink -f instead. See also https://gist.github.com/hilbix/1ec361d00a8178ae8ea0 for possible updates:

: relpath A B
# Calculate relative path from A to B, returns true on success
# Example: ln -s "$(relpath "$A" "$B")" "$B"
relpath()
{
local X Y A
# We can create dangling softlinks
X="$(readlink -m -- "$1")" || return
Y="$(readlink -m -- "$2")" || return
X="${X%/}/"
A=""
while   Y="${Y%/*}"
        [ ".${X#"$Y"/}" = ".$X" ]
do
        A="../$A"
done
X="$A${X#"$Y"/}"
X="${X%/}"
echo "${X:-.}"
}

Notes:

  • Care was taken that it is safe against unwanted shell meta character expansion, in case filenames contain * or ?.
  • The output is meant to be usable as the first argument to ln -s:
    • relpath / / gives . and not the empty string
    • relpath a a gives a, even if a happens to be a directory
  • Most common cases were tested to give reasonable results, too.
  • This solution uses string prefix matching, hence readlink is required to canonicalize paths.
  • Thanks to readlink -m it works for not yet existing paths, too.

On old systems, where readlink -m is not available, readlink -f fails if the file does not exist. So you probably need some workaround like this (untested!):

readlink_missing()
{
readlink -m -- "$1" && return
readlink -f -- "$1" && return
[ -e . ] && echo "$(readlink_missing "$(dirname "$1")")/$(basename "$1")"
}

This is not really quite correct in case $1 includes . or .. for nonexisting paths (like in /doesnotexist/./a), but it should cover most cases.

(Replace readlink -m -- above by readlink_missing.)

share|improve this answer

I wrote pure bash function to get relative path. If you only copy & paste my code, you can write simply like below.

absolute="/foo/bar"
current="/foo/baz/foo"
relative=$(path_get_relative "$current" "$absolute")
echo "$relative" # => ../../bar
  • It doesn't need other languages such as perl or python.
  • It runs on Mac OS X and Linux.
  • It supports both absolute and relative input path.
  • It doesn't need to exists actual directory for input path.
  • It supports space character.
  • It supports those unnormalized path.

    path_get_relative "./h o g e/a/../piyo//./" "fu   ga/moya" # => ../../fu   ga/moya
    

code is below. more other using example and test are in my github repo.

#!/bin/bash
# set -ue 環境からのsourceを想定    

# $1: src array name
# $2: dest array name
# 配列をコピーする。
array_copy(){
    eval "$2=(\"\${$1[@]:0}\")"
}    

# $1: string
# $2: needle string
# 部分文字列を探す。見つからなければ-1を返す。
str_pos(){
    local i
    local n=$(( ${#1} - ${#2} + 1 ))
    for (( i = 0 ; i < n ; i++ )) ; do
        if [[ "${1:$i:${#2}}" == "$2" ]] ; then
            echo "$i"
            return 0
        fi
    done
    echo "-1"
}    

# $1: string
# $2: delimiter string
# $3: dest array name
# 文字列を分割して配列に格納する。
# 空文字列は空の配列になる。
# デリミタは空文字列はダメ。
str_split(){
    local str=$1
    local __a=()
    if [[ "$2" == "" ]] ; then
        echo "delimiter is empty string" >&2
        return 1
    fi
    if [[ ${#str} -gt 0 ]] ; then
        while true ; do
            local pos="$(str_pos "$str" "$2")"
            if [[ $pos -eq -1 ]] ; then
                __a+=("$str")
                break
            fi
            __a+=("${str:0:$pos}")
            str="${str:$(( pos + ${#2} ))}"
        done
    fi
    array_copy "__a" "$3"
}    

# $1: array name
# $2: glue
# 配列を結合した文字列を返す。
array_join(){
    local __a=()
    local i
    local str=""
    array_copy "$1" "__a"
    for (( i = 0 ; i < ${#__a[@]} ; i++ )) ; do
        if [[ $i -gt 0 ]] ; then
            str="$str$2"
        fi
        str="$str${__a[$i]}"
    done
    echo "$str"
}    

# $1: path string
# パス文字列が絶対パスかどうかを返り値で返す。
path_is_absolute(){
    [[ "${1:0:1}" == "/" ]]
}    

# $1: base path string
# $2: append path string
# パス文字列を追加する。
# baseの末尾に[/]が無ければ追加する。
# 追加するパスは絶対パスはダメ。
path_append(){
    if path_is_absolute "$2" ; then
        echo "absolute path can't append: $2" >&2
        return 1
    fi
    if [[ "$1" == "" ]] ; then
        echo "$2"
        return 0
    fi
    echo "${1%/}/$2"
}    

# $1: path string
# $2: dest array name
# パス文字列をパス要素配列に分割する。
# 絶対パスの場合、配列の第一要素は[/]になる。
# 例
# a/b//c/ => [ "a", "b", "", "c", "" ]
# /a/b//c => [ "/", "a", "b", "", "c"]
# 結果の配列は、path_array_joinで元のパス文字列に戻る。
path_split(){
    local __a2=() # 呼び出し先での衝突回避
    if path_is_absolute "$1" ; then
        str_split "${1:1}" "/" "__a2"
        __a2=("/" "${__a2[@]:0}")
    else
        str_split "$1" "/" "__a2"
    fi
    array_copy "__a2" "$2"
}    

# $1: array name
# パス要素配列を結合してパス文字列にする。
# パス要素配列についてはpath_splitを参照。
path_array_join(){
    local __a2=() # 呼び出し先での衝突回避
    array_copy "$1" "__a2"
    if [[ "${__a2[@]:0:1}" == "/" ]] ; then
        # 先頭要素を剥がす
        echo -n "/"
        __a2=("${__a2[@]:1}")
    fi
    array_join "__a2" "/"
}    

# $1: path string
# パス文字列を正規化する。
# 連続する[/]は1つにする。
# [.]は除去する。
# [..]はできるだけ除去する。
path_standardize(){
    local i=0
    local src_items=()
    local ret_items=()
    path_split "$1" "src_items"
    while [[ $i -lt ${#src_items[@]} ]] ; do
        local item=${src_items[$i]}
        if [[ "$item" == "" || "$item" == "." ]] ; then
            # 何もしない
            :
        elif [[ "$item" == ".." && ${#ret_items[@]} -gt 0 ]] ; then
            # ..が来ていて、左側に要素がある
            local n=${#ret_items[@]}
            local last=${ret_items[$n-1]}
            if [[ "$last" == "/" ]] ; then
                # ルートの/は..を飲み込む。
                :
            elif [[ "$last" == ".." ]] ; then
                # ..に..は連結する
                ret_items+=("..")
            else
                # 通常は末尾を食う
                ret_items=("${ret_items[@]:0:$n-1}")
            fi
        else
            # 付けたす
            ret_items+=("$item")
        fi
        # 次に進む
        i=$(( i + 1 ))
    done
    path_array_join "ret_items"
}    

# $1: path string
# パス文字列を正規化した絶対パスにして返す。
# 相対パスだった場合、カレントディレクトリを用いて絶対化する。
path_get_absolute(){
    local path=$1
    if ! path_is_absolute "$1" ; then
        path=$(path_append "$(pwd)" "$path")
    fi
    path_standardize "$path"
}    

# $1: from path string
# $2: to path string
# fromパスからtoパスへの相対パスを求める。
# 結果の相対パスをfromに結合すると、toを示す。
path_get_relative(){
    local from_items=()
    local to_items=()
    path_split "$(path_get_absolute "$1")" "from_items"
    path_split "$(path_get_absolute "$2")" "to_items"    

    local i
    # 一致する限り進む
    for (( i = 0 ; i < ${#from_items[@]} && i < ${#to_items[@]} ; i++ )) ; do
        if [[ "${from_items[$i]}" != "${to_items[$i]}" ]] ; then
            break
        fi
    done
    local start_i=$i
    # fromの残りを..の繰り返しに変換する
    local ret_items=()
    for (( i = $start_i ; i < ${#from_items[@]} ; i++ )) ; do
        ret_items+=("..")
    done
    # toの残りをつなげる
    for (( i = $start_i ; i < ${#to_items[@]} ; i++ )) ; do
        ret_items+=("${to_items[$i]}")
    done
    path_array_join "ret_items"
}
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