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Given the following database structure alt text

I'm trying to write a LINQ query that will return images grouped by tags it's associated with. So far I've got this:

var images = from img in db.Images
    join imgTags in db.ImageTags on img.idImage equals imgTags.idImage
    join t in db.Tags on imgTags.idTag equals t.idTag
    where img.OCRData.Contains(searchText.Text)
    group img by new { t.TagName } into aGroup
    select new
    {
        GroupName = aGroup.Key.TagName,
        Items = from x in aGroup
        select new ImageFragment()
        {
             ImageID = x.idImage,
             ScanDate = x.ScanTime
        }
    };

Which works great. However, I also want to return Images that do not have any tags associated with them in a group of "(Untagged)" or something. I can't wrap my head around how I would do this without inserting a default tag for every image and that seems like generally not a very good solution.

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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It's a little tricky, but you can do it in one big query if you have the ability to instantiate new ImageTag and Tag instances for linq to work with. Essentially, when you're doing an outer join, you have to use the into keyword with the DefaultIfEmpty(...) method to deal with the "outer join gaps" (e.g., when the right side of the joined key is null in a typical SQL left outer join).

var images = from img in db.Images
     join imgTags in db.ImageTags on img.idImage equals imgTags.idImage
     into outerImageRef 
     from outerIR in outerImageRef.DefaultIfEmpty(new ImageTag() { idImage = img.idImage, idTag = -1 })
     join t in db.Tags on imgTags.idTag equals t.idTag
     into outerRefTags 
     from outerRT in outerRefTags.DefaultIfEmpty(new Tag(){ idTag=-1, TagName ="untagged"})
     group img by outerRT.TagName into aGroup
     select new {
         GroupName = aGroup.Key,
         Items = from x in aGroup
             select new ImageFragment() {
                 ImageID = x.idImage,
                 ScanDate = x.ScanTime
             }
     };

Hopefully the above compiles since I don't have your exact environment, I built my solution using my own data types and then converted it to your question's description. Basically the key parts are the extra into and DefaultIfEmpty lines that essentially help add the extra "rows" into the massively joined table that's in memory if you're thinking about it in the traditional sql sense.

However, there's a more readable solution that doesn't require the in memory instantiation of linq entities (you'll have to convert this one yourself to your environment):

//this first query will return a collection of anonymous types with TagName and ImageId,
// essentially a relation from joining your ImageTags x-ref table and Tags so that
// each row is the tag and image id (as Robert Harvey mentioned in his comment to your Q)
var tagNamesWithImageIds = from tag in Tags
       join refer in ImageTags on tag.IdTag equals refer.IdTag
       select new {
           TagName = tag.Name,
           ImageId = refer.IdImage
       };
//Now we can get your solution by outer joining the images to the above relation
// and filling in the "outer join gaps" with the anonymous type again of "untagged"
// and then joining that with the Images table one last time to get your grouping and projection.
var images = from img in Images
     join t in tagNamesWithImageIds on img.IdImage equals t.ImageId
     into outerJoin
     from o in outerJoin.DefaultIfEmpty(new { TagName = "untagged", ImageId = img.IdImage })
     join img2 in Images on o.ImageId equals img2.IdImage
     group img2 by o.TagName into aGroup
     select new {
         TagName = aGroup.Key,
         Images = aGroup.Select(i => i.Data).ToList() //you'll definitely need to replace this with your code's logic. I just had a much simpler data type in my workspace.
     };

Hope that makes sense. Of course, you can always just set your application to tag everything by default w/ "untagged" or do some much simpler LINQ queries to create a list of image id's that are not present in your ImageTag table, and then union or something.

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I managed to figure it out without seeing this, but this would have been helpful never the less. –  Boarder2 Apr 3 '10 at 5:42
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If you want image records when there are no corresponding tag records, you need to perform an
outer join on the image tags table.

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Hmm, I'm not sure how to syntactically do that with this query. –  Boarder2 Apr 2 '10 at 2:27
1  
If you need to simplify the query, join the tag and imagetag tables first, and then outer-join the result with the image table. –  Robert Harvey Apr 2 '10 at 2:43
    
It's a case of adding an 'into' on one of the joins and a .DefaultIfEmpty(). –  SteadyEddi Apr 2 '10 at 12:41
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Here's what I ended up doing. I haven't actually checked what kind of SQL this is generating yet, I'm guessing that it's probably not exactly pretty. I think I'd be better off doing a couple queries and aggregating the stuff myself, but in any case this works:

var images = from img in db.Images
                     join imgTags in db.ImageTags on img.idImage equals imgTags.idImage into g
                     from imgTags in g.DefaultIfEmpty()
                     join t in db.Tags on imgTags.idTag equals t.idTag into g1
                     from t in g1.DefaultIfEmpty()
                     where img.OCRData.Contains(searchText.Text)
                     group img by t == null ? "(No Tags)" : t.TagName into aGroup
                     select new
                    {
                        GroupName = aGroup.Key,
                        Items = from x in aGroup
                                        select new ImageFragment()
                                        {
                                            ImageID = x.idImage,
                                            ScanDate = x.ScanTime
                                        }
                    };
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