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I have a 128-bit unsigned integer A and a 64-bit unsigned integer B. What's the fastest way to calculate A % B - that is the (64-bit) remainder from dividing A by B?

I'm looking to do this in either C or assembly language, but I need to target the 32-bit x86 platform. This unfortunately means that I cannot take advantage of compiler support for 128-bit integers, nor of the x64 architecture's ability to perform the required operation in a single instruction.

Edit:

Thank you for the answers so far. However, it appears to me that the suggested algorithms would be quite slow - wouldn't the fastest way to perform a 128-bit by 64-bit division be to leverage the processor's native support for 64-bit by 32-bit division? Does anyone know if there is a way to perform the larger division in terms of a few smaller divisions?

Re: How often does B change?

Primarily I'm interested in a general solution - what calculation would you perform if A and B are likely to be different every time?

However, a second possible situation is that B does not vary as often as A - there may be as many as 200 As to divide by each B. How would your answer differ in this case?

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2  
How often does B change? –  user287792 Apr 4 '10 at 16:28
    
How fast must be function? How many 128 by 64 modulo operations per second do you expect? –  GJ. Apr 10 '10 at 18:09
    
The Russian Peasant algorithm is simple but it uses loops and don't take advantage of the divide instruction in x86. You can use the algorithm here, it's about 64/32 bit division by 32/16 bit divide instruction but you can double it to 128/64 bit by 64/32 bit –  Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Jan 29 at 2:57

10 Answers 10

up vote 22 down vote accepted
+200

You can use the division version of Russian Peasant Multiplication.

To find the remainder, execute (in pseudo-code):

X = B;

while (X < A/2)
{
    X <<= 1;
}

while (A >= B)
{
    if (A >= X)
        A -= X;
    X >>= 1;
}

The modulus is left in A.

You'll need to implement the shifts, comparisons and subtractions to operate on values made up of a pair of 64 bit numbers, but that's fairly trivial.

This will loop at most 254 times (with a 128 bit A). Of course you need to do a pre-check for a zero divisor.

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Perhaps you're looking for a finished program, but the basic algorithms for multi-precision arithmetic can be found in Knuth's Art of Computer Programming, Volume 2. You can find the division algorithm described online here. The algorithms deal with arbitrary multi-precision arithmetic, and so are more general than you need, but you should be able to simplify them for 128 bit arithmetic done on 64- or 32-bit digits. Be prepared for a reasonable amount of work (a) understanding the algorithm, and (b) converting it to C or assembler.

You might also want to check out Hacker's Delight, which is full of very clever assembler and other low-level hackery, including some multi-precision arithmetic.

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Thanks, I think I understand how the algorithms described at sputsoft.com apply to this situation. AFAICT, Algorithm G shows how to perform an mb-bit by nb-bit division as a series of m-n+1 (n+1)b-bit by nb-bit divisions, where b is the number of bits per digit. Algorithm Q then shows how to perform each of these (n+1)b-bit by nb-bit divisions as a single 2b-bit by b-bit division. Given that the largest dividend we can handle is 64-bit, we need to set b=32. The algorithms thus break down our 128-bit by 64-bit division (m=4, n=2) into 3 64-bit by 32-bit divisions. Does this sound accurate? –  Paul Baker Apr 10 '10 at 12:40
    
I can tell you've already put more detailed thought into the algorithms than I did when I posted my reply, so I can't say for sure whether your final count of division operations is right. However, I do think you've got the basic idea of how to proceed. –  Dale Hagglund Apr 10 '10 at 14:36
    
Another thought: you might want to consider 16-bit digits if you're writing in C and hence don't have direct access to 32b x 32b -> 64b multiply instructions, or don't want to embed your 32-bit digits into a 64-bit integer and use the compiler's own builtin 64-bit arithmetic. I can't think of a strong reason to avoid the latter, but you might want to check out the generated assembly code for it, if you're really, really, really concerned about speed. –  Dale Hagglund Apr 10 '10 at 14:42
    
That sputsoft link seems to be invalid now. Not sure why—the site is still there. This page seems to be connected, in that the kanooth-numbers library was once called sputsoftnumbers. –  Craig McQueen Sep 4 '13 at 4:50

Given A = AH*2^64 + AL:

A % B == (((AH % B) * (2^64 % B)) + (AL % B)) % B
      == (((AH % B) * ((2^64 - B) % B)) + (AL % B)) % B

If your compiler supports 64-bit integers, then this is probably the easiest way to go. MSVC's implementation of a 64-bit modulo on 32-bit x86 is some hairy loop filled assembly (VC\crt\src\intel\llrem.asm for the brave), so I'd personally go with that.

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No, as Paul sed the target is 32-bit x86 platform. Intel CPUs under IA32 doesn't support 64 bit division or 128 bit multiplication this only possible in 64 bit CPU mode. In that case the method described by caf is much faster! –  GJ. Apr 5 '10 at 8:02
1  
@GJ, if the compiler supports 64-bit integers, it will be easier to just use the mod operation for 64-bit integers. caf's method is the one used by MSVC anyway for 32-bit x86, based on my cursory evaluation of the assembly. It also includes an optimization for dividends below 2^32. So you could either code it yourself or just use the existing compiler support. –  MSN Apr 5 '10 at 16:21
    
@MNS, jep you are right it will be easier, but demand is speed! Optimisation for dividends below 2^32 isn't useful if you are using random (full spectre) UInt64 because the ratio between 2^32 and 2^64 numbers is very, very small. –  GJ. Apr 5 '10 at 17:03
1  
This is also nice because you get a nice perf boost for free if/when you move to x86_64. –  Billy ONeal Apr 6 '10 at 6:15
1  
I'm not sure I understand how this works. B is 64-bit, so (AH % B) and ((2^64 - B) % B)) will both be 64-bit. Won't multiplying these together give us a 128-bit number, thus leaving us still needing to perform a 128-bit by 64-bit modulo? –  Paul Baker Apr 10 '10 at 12:54

This is almost untested partly speed modificated Mod128by64 'Russian peasant' algorithm function. Unfortunately I'm a Delphi user so this function works under Delphi. :) But the assembler is almost the same so...

function Mod128by64(Dividend: PUInt128; Divisor: PUInt64): UInt64;
//In : eax = @Dividend
//   : edx = @Divisor
//Out: eax:edx as Remainder
asm
//Registers inside rutine
//Divisor = edx:ebp
//Dividend = bh:ebx:edx //We need 64 bits + 1 bit in bh
//Result = esi:edi
//ecx = Loop counter and Dividend index
  push    ebx                     //Store registers to stack
  push    esi
  push    edi
  push    ebp
  mov     ebp, [edx]              //Divisor = edx:ebp
  mov     edx, [edx + 4]
  mov     ecx, ebp                //Div by 0 test
  or      ecx, edx                
  jz      @DivByZero
  xor     edi, edi                //Clear result
  xor     esi, esi
//Start of 64 bit division Loop
  mov     ecx, 15                 //Load byte loop shift counter and Dividend index
@SkipShift8Bits:                  //Small Dividend numbers shift optimisation
  cmp     [eax + ecx], ch         //Zero test
  jnz     @EndSkipShiftDividend
  loop    @SkipShift8Bits         //Skip 8 bit loop
@EndSkipShiftDividend:
  test    edx, $FF000000          //Huge Divisor Numbers Shift Optimisation
  jz      @Shift8Bits             //This Divisor is > $00FFFFFF:FFFFFFFF
  mov     ecx, 8                  //Load byte shift counter
  mov     esi, [eax + 12]         //Do fast 56 bit (7 bytes) shift...
  shr     esi, cl                 //esi = $00XXXXXX
  mov     edi, [eax + 9]          //Load for one byte right shifted 32 bit value
@Shift8Bits:
  mov     bl, [eax + ecx]         //Load 8 bits of Dividend
//Here we can unrole partial loop 8 bit division to increase execution speed...
  mov     ch, 8                   //Set partial byte counter value
@Do65BitsShift:
  shl     bl, 1                   //Shift dividend left for one bit
  rcl     edi, 1
  rcl     esi, 1
  setc    bh                      //Save 65th bit
  sub     edi, ebp                //Compare dividend and  divisor
  sbb     esi, edx                //Subtract the divisor
  sbb     bh, 0                   //Use 65th bit in bh
  jnc     @NoCarryAtCmp           //Test...
  add     edi, ebp                //Return privius dividend state
  adc     esi, edx
@NoCarryAtCmp:
  dec     ch                      //Decrement counter
  jnz     @Do65BitsShift
//End of 8 bit (byte) partial division loop
  dec     cl                      //Decrement byte loop shift counter
  jns     @Shift8Bits             //Last jump at cl = 0!!!
//End of 64 bit division loop
  mov     eax, edi                //Load result to eax:edx
  mov     edx, esi
@RestoreRegisters:
  pop     ebp                     //Restore Registers
  pop     edi
  pop     esi
  pop     ebx
  ret
@DivByZero:
  xor     eax, eax                //Here you can raise Div by 0 exception, now function only return 0.
  xor     edx, edx
  jmp     @RestoreRegisters
end;

At least one more speed optimisation is possible! After 'Huge Divisor Numbers Shift Optimisation' we can test divisors high bit, if it is 0 we do not need to use extra bh register as 65th bit to store in it. So unrolled part of loop can look like:

  shl     bl,1                    //Shift dividend left for one bit
  rcl     edi,1
  rcl     esi,1
  sub     edi, ebp                //Compare dividend and  divisor
  sbb     esi, edx                //Subtract the divisor
  jnc     @NoCarryAtCmpX
  add     edi, ebp                //Return privius dividend state
  adc     esi, edx
@NoCarryAtCmpX:
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I have made both version of Mod128by64 'Russian peasant' division function: classic and speed optimised. Speed optimised can do on my 3Ghz PC more than 1000.000 random calculations per second and is more than three times faster than classic function. If we compare the execution time of calculating 128 by 64 and calculating 64 by 64 bit modulo than this function is only about 50% slower.

Classic Russian peasant:

function Mod128by64Clasic(Dividend: PUInt128; Divisor: PUInt64): UInt64;
//In : eax = @Dividend
//   : edx = @Divisor
//Out: eax:edx as Remainder
asm
//Registers inside rutine
//edx:ebp = Divisor
//ecx = Loop counter
//Result = esi:edi
  push    ebx                     //Store registers to stack
  push    esi
  push    edi
  push    ebp
  mov     ebp, [edx]              //Load  divisor to edx:ebp
  mov     edx, [edx + 4]
  mov     ecx, ebp                //Div by 0 test
  or      ecx, edx
  jz      @DivByZero
  push    [eax]                   //Store Divisor to the stack
  push    [eax + 4]
  push    [eax + 8]
  push    [eax + 12]
  xor     edi, edi                //Clear result
  xor     esi, esi
  mov     ecx, 128                //Load shift counter
@Do128BitsShift:
  shl     [esp + 12], 1           //Shift dividend from stack left for one bit
  rcl     [esp + 8], 1
  rcl     [esp + 4], 1
  rcl     [esp], 1
  rcl     edi, 1
  rcl     esi, 1
  setc    bh                      //Save 65th bit
  sub     edi, ebp                //Compare dividend and  divisor
  sbb     esi, edx                //Subtract the divisor
  sbb     bh, 0                   //Use 65th bit in bh
  jnc     @NoCarryAtCmp           //Test...
  add     edi, ebp                //Return privius dividend state
  adc     esi, edx
@NoCarryAtCmp:
  loop    @Do128BitsShift
//End of 128 bit division loop
  mov     eax, edi                //Load result to eax:edx
  mov     edx, esi
@RestoreRegisters:
  lea     esp, esp + 16           //Restore Divisors space on stack
  pop     ebp                     //Restore Registers
  pop     edi                     
  pop     esi
  pop     ebx
  ret
@DivByZero:
  xor     eax, eax                //Here you can raise Div by 0 exception, now function only return 0.
  xor     edx, edx
  jmp     @RestoreRegisters
end;

Speed optimised Russian peasant:

function Mod128by64Oprimized(Dividend: PUInt128; Divisor: PUInt64): UInt64;
//In : eax = @Dividend
//   : edx = @Divisor
//Out: eax:edx as Remainder
asm
//Registers inside rutine
//Divisor = edx:ebp
//Dividend = ebx:edx //We need 64 bits
//Result = esi:edi
//ecx = Loop counter and Dividend index
  push    ebx                     //Store registers to stack
  push    esi
  push    edi
  push    ebp
  mov     ebp, [edx]              //Divisor = edx:ebp
  mov     edx, [edx + 4]
  mov     ecx, ebp                //Div by 0 test
  or      ecx, edx
  jz      @DivByZero
  xor     edi, edi                //Clear result
  xor     esi, esi
//Start of 64 bit division Loop
  mov     ecx, 15                 //Load byte loop shift counter and Dividend index
@SkipShift8Bits:                  //Small Dividend numbers shift optimisation
  cmp     [eax + ecx], ch         //Zero test
  jnz     @EndSkipShiftDividend
  loop    @SkipShift8Bits         //Skip Compute 8 Bits unroled loop ?
@EndSkipShiftDividend:
  test    edx, $FF000000          //Huge Divisor Numbers Shift Optimisation
  jz      @Shift8Bits             //This Divisor is > $00FFFFFF:FFFFFFFF
  mov     ecx, 8                  //Load byte shift counter
  mov     esi, [eax + 12]         //Do fast 56 bit (7 bytes) shift...
  shr     esi, cl                 //esi = $00XXXXXX
  mov     edi, [eax + 9]          //Load for one byte right shifted 32 bit value
@Shift8Bits:
  mov     bl, [eax + ecx]         //Load 8 bit part of Dividend
//Compute 8 Bits unroled loop
  shl     bl, 1                   //Shift dividend left for one bit
  rcl     edi, 1
  rcl     esi, 1
  jc      @DividentAbove0         //dividend hi bit set?
  cmp     esi, edx                //dividend hi part larger?
  jb      @DividentBelow0
  ja      @DividentAbove0
  cmp     edi, ebp                //dividend lo part larger?
  jb      @DividentBelow0
@DividentAbove0:
  sub     edi, ebp                //Return privius dividend state
  sbb     esi, edx
@DividentBelow0:
  shl     bl, 1                   //Shift dividend left for one bit
  rcl     edi, 1
  rcl     esi, 1
  jc      @DividentAbove1         //dividend hi bit set?
  cmp     esi, edx                //dividend hi part larger?
  jb      @DividentBelow1
  ja      @DividentAbove1
  cmp     edi, ebp                //dividend lo part larger?
  jb      @DividentBelow1
@DividentAbove1:
  sub     edi, ebp                //Return privius dividend state
  sbb     esi, edx
@DividentBelow1:
  shl     bl, 1                   //Shift dividend left for one bit
  rcl     edi, 1
  rcl     esi, 1
  jc      @DividentAbove2         //dividend hi bit set?
  cmp     esi, edx                //dividend hi part larger?
  jb      @DividentBelow2
  ja      @DividentAbove2
  cmp     edi, ebp                //dividend lo part larger?
  jb      @DividentBelow2
@DividentAbove2:
  sub     edi, ebp                //Return privius dividend state
  sbb     esi, edx
@DividentBelow2:
  shl     bl, 1                   //Shift dividend left for one bit
  rcl     edi, 1
  rcl     esi, 1
  jc      @DividentAbove3         //dividend hi bit set?
  cmp     esi, edx                //dividend hi part larger?
  jb      @DividentBelow3
  ja      @DividentAbove3
  cmp     edi, ebp                //dividend lo part larger?
  jb      @DividentBelow3
@DividentAbove3:
  sub     edi, ebp                //Return privius dividend state
  sbb     esi, edx
@DividentBelow3:
  shl     bl, 1                   //Shift dividend left for one bit
  rcl     edi, 1
  rcl     esi, 1
  jc      @DividentAbove4         //dividend hi bit set?
  cmp     esi, edx                //dividend hi part larger?
  jb      @DividentBelow4
  ja      @DividentAbove4
  cmp     edi, ebp                //dividend lo part larger?
  jb      @DividentBelow4
@DividentAbove4:
  sub     edi, ebp                //Return privius dividend state
  sbb     esi, edx
@DividentBelow4:
  shl     bl, 1                   //Shift dividend left for one bit
  rcl     edi, 1
  rcl     esi, 1
  jc      @DividentAbove5         //dividend hi bit set?
  cmp     esi, edx                //dividend hi part larger?
  jb      @DividentBelow5
  ja      @DividentAbove5
  cmp     edi, ebp                //dividend lo part larger?
  jb      @DividentBelow5
@DividentAbove5:
  sub     edi, ebp                //Return privius dividend state
  sbb     esi, edx
@DividentBelow5:
  shl     bl, 1                   //Shift dividend left for one bit
  rcl     edi, 1
  rcl     esi, 1
  jc      @DividentAbove6         //dividend hi bit set?
  cmp     esi, edx                //dividend hi part larger?
  jb      @DividentBelow6
  ja      @DividentAbove6
  cmp     edi, ebp                //dividend lo part larger?
  jb      @DividentBelow6
@DividentAbove6:
  sub     edi, ebp                //Return privius dividend state
  sbb     esi, edx
@DividentBelow6:
  shl     bl, 1                   //Shift dividend left for one bit
  rcl     edi, 1
  rcl     esi, 1
  jc      @DividentAbove7         //dividend hi bit set?
  cmp     esi, edx                //dividend hi part larger?
  jb      @DividentBelow7
  ja      @DividentAbove7
  cmp     edi, ebp                //dividend lo part larger?
  jb      @DividentBelow7
@DividentAbove7:
  sub     edi, ebp                //Return privius dividend state
  sbb     esi, edx
@DividentBelow7:
//End of Compute 8 Bits (unroled loop)
  dec     cl                      //Decrement byte loop shift counter
  jns     @Shift8Bits             //Last jump at cl = 0!!!
//End of division loop
  mov     eax, edi                //Load result to eax:edx
  mov     edx, esi
@RestoreRegisters:
  pop     ebp                     //Restore Registers
  pop     edi
  pop     esi
  pop     ebx
  ret
@DivByZero:
  xor     eax, eax                //Here you can raise Div by 0 exception, now function only return 0.
  xor     edx, edx
  jmp     @RestoreRegisters
end;
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If you have a recent x86 machine, there are 128-bit registers for SSE2+. I've never tried to write assembly for anything other than basic x86, but I suspect there are some guides out there.

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6  
The xmm registers are not useful for this type of operation, as they aren't true 128-bit GPRs; they're a bunch of smaller registers packed together for vectorized operations. –  kquinn Apr 2 '10 at 20:34
1  
there are 128-bit integer instructions in SSE2. as far as I can tell from the reference manuals, there's no reason they wouldn't be useful for this. There's a multiply, add/subtract, and shift. –  Ben Collins Apr 7 '10 at 12:27
    
@Ben: In my (brief) look through the Intel manuals I was unable to find a 128-bit integer addition instruction. Do you know what this instruction is called? –  Paul Baker Apr 10 '10 at 10:41
    
@Paul: PMULUDQ, PADDQ, PSUBQ, PSLLDQ, PSRLDQ. There's an overview listing on v 1, p. 5-25 of the software developer's manual. –  Ben Collins Apr 10 '10 at 14:43
1  
I have looked at those instructions in volume 2 of the Software Developer's Manual and it seems to me that only PSLLDQ and PSRLDQ treat an xmm register as a 128-bit integer. PADDQ and PSUBQ, by contrast, seem to treat an xmm register as "packed quadwords" (i.e. a pair of 64-bit integers). Is this not correct? –  Paul Baker Apr 10 '10 at 15:18

As a general rule, division is slow and multiplication is faster, and bit shifting is faster yet. From what I have seen of the answers so far, most of the answers have been using a brute force approach using bit-shifts. There exists another way. Whether it is faster remains to be seen (AKA profile it).

Instead of dividing, multiply by the reciprocal. Thus, to discover A % B, first calculate the reciprocal of B ... 1/B. This can be done with a few loops using the Newton-Raphson method of convergence. To do this well will depend upon a good set of initial values in a table.

For more details on the Newton-Raphson method of converging on the reciprocal, please refer to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Division_(digital)

Once you have the reciprocal, the quotient Q = A * 1/B.

The remainder R = A - Q*B.

To determine if this would be faster than the brute force (as there will be many more multiplies since we will be using 32-bit registers to simulate 64-bit and 128-bit numbers, profile it.

If B is constant in your code, you can pre-calculate the reciprocal and simply calculate using the last two formulae. This, I am sure will be faster than bit-shifting.

Hope this helps.

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Another approach which may sometimes be even better if e.g. the divisor is 2^64-k for some relatively small k, and the dividend is less than 2^128/k, is to add k to the input value, capture and zero the top 64 bits of the dividend, multiply the captured value by k (for a 96-bit or 128-bit result), and add that to the lower 64 bits of the dividend. If the result is greater than 2^64, repeat. Once the result is less than 2^64, subtract k. For values of k below 2^32 (half the divisor size), two capture-zero-multiply-subtract sequences should suffice. –  supercat May 16 '13 at 18:34
1  
The question is about integer calculations. What if 1/B (or in integer form, 2^64/B or 2^128/B) doesn't have an exact integer representation? –  Craig McQueen Sep 2 '13 at 23:38

I'd like to share a few thoughts.

It's not as simple as MSN proposes I'm afraid.

In the expression:

(((AH % B) * ((2^64 - B) % B)) + (AL % B)) % B

both multiplication and addition may overflow. I think one could take it into account and still use the general concept with some modifications, but something tells me it's going to get really scary.

I was curious how 64 bit modulo operation was implemented in MSVC and I tried to find something out. I don't really know assembly and all I had available was Express edition, without the source of VC\crt\src\intel\llrem.asm, but I think I managed to get some idea what's going on, after a bit of playing with the debugger and disassembly output. I tried to figure out how the remainder is calculated in case of positive integers and the divisor >=2^32. There is some code that deals with negative numbers of course, but I didn't dig into that.

Here is how I see it:

If divisor >= 2^32 both the dividend and the divisor are shifted right as much as necessary to fit the divisor into 32 bits. In other words: if it takes n digits to write the divisor down in binary and n > 32, n-32 least significant digits of both the divisor and the dividend are discarded. After that, the division is performed using hardware support for dividing 64 bit integers by 32 bit ones. The result might be incorrect, but I think it can be proved, that the result may be off by at most 1. After the division, the divisor (original one) is multiplied by the result and the product subtracted from the dividend. Then it is corrected by adding or subtracting the divisor if necessary (if the result of the division was off by one).

It's easy to divide 128 bit integer by 32 bit one leveraging hardware support for 64-bit by 32-bit division. In case the divisor < 2^32, one can calculate the remainder performing just 4 divisions as follows:

Let's assume the dividend is stored in:

DWORD dividend[4] = ...

the remainder will go into:

DWORD remainder;

1) Divide dividend[3] by divisor. Store the remainder in remainder.
2) Divide QWORD (remainder:dividend[2]) by divisor. Store the remainder in remainder.
3) Divide QWORD (remainder:dividend[1]) by divisor. Store the remainder in remainder.
4) Divide QWORD (remainder:dividend[0]) by divisor. Store the remainder in remainder.

After those 4 steps the variable remainder will hold what You are looking for. (Please don't kill me if I got the endianess wrong. I'm not even a programmer)

In case the divisor is grater than 2^32-1 I don't have good news. I don't have a complete proof that the result after the shift is off by no more than 1, in the procedure I described earlier, which I believe MSVC is using. I think however that it has something to do with the fact, that the part that is discarded is at least 2^31 times less than the divisor, the dividend is less than 2^64 and the divisor is greater than 2^32-1, so the result is less than 2^32.

If the dividend has 128 bits the trick with discarding bits won't work. So in general case the best solution is probably the one proposed by GJ or caf. (Well, it would be probably the best even if discarding bits worked. Division, multiplication subtraction and correction on 128 bit integer might be slower.)

I was also thinking about using the floating point hardware. x87 floating point unit uses 80 bit precision format with fraction 64 bits long. I think one can get the exact result of 64 bit by 64 bit division. (Not the remainder directly, but also the remainder using multiplication and subtraction like in the "MSVC procedure"). IF the dividend >=2^64 and < 2^128 storing it in the floating point format seems similar to discarding least significant bits in "MSVC procedure". Maybe someone can prove the error in that case is bound and find it useful. I have no idea if it has a chance to be faster than GJ's solution, but maybe it's worth it to try.

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I think your thinking is more or less correct. Yes the idea about using x87 double-precision floating point division is also known, but the x87 only support 63bit division because the 64th bit is reserved for mantissa sign according: IEEE Standard 754 for Binary Floating-Point Arithmetic. –  GJ. Apr 11 '10 at 7:03
1  
I was talking about the Double-Extended format supported by x87. In double format the fraction is only 53 bits long. In the extended one the fraction or rather the significand is 64 bits long. There is a difference between this format and the smaller ones. In extended format the leading bit of the significand is explicit unlike in double or single ones, but I don't think it changes much. It should be possible to store exactly 64 bit integers in this format. The sign is stored in bit 79 in extended format. –  Maciej Hehl Apr 11 '10 at 10:55
    
I have check the IEEE Standard and you are right. The mantisa sign is stored in last byte. –  GJ. Apr 11 '10 at 16:13
    
What you describe is the so called base case division as described by Knuth in his algorithm D (TAOCP Vol. 2). It relies on the fact that if you divide the top two "digits" of the dividend by the top digit of the divisor, the result is off by at most 2. You test this by subtracting the result * divisor from the dividend/remainder and see if it is negative. If so, you add the divisor and correct the quotient until the remainder is positive again. Then you loop for the next lower digit etc. –  Rudy Velthuis Mar 14 '13 at 12:30

The solution depends on what exactly you are trying to solve.

E.g. if you are doing arithmetic in a ring modulo a 64-bit integer then using Montgomerys reduction is very efficient. Of course this assumes that you the same modulus many times and that it pays off to convert the elements of the ring into a special representation.


To give just a very rough estimate on the speed of this Montgomerys reduction: I have an old benchmark that performs a modular exponentiation with 64-bit modulus and exponent in 1600 ns on a 2.4Ghz Core 2. This exponentiation does about 96 modular multiplications (and modular reductions) and hence needs about 40 cycles per modular multiplication.

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The wikipedia article describes using Montgomery reduction to increase the efficiency of modular multiplication (and, by extension, modular exponentiation). Do you know if the technique still applies in a situation where there are a large number of modular additions as well as multiplications? –  Paul Baker Apr 10 '10 at 10:48
    
Addition is done as usual. If both summands are in Montgomery representation then adding them together gives their sum in Montgomery representation. If this sum is larger than the modulus, just subtract the modulus. –  Accipitridae Apr 12 '10 at 18:33

Since there is no predefined 128-bit integer type in C, bits of A have to be represented in an array. Although B (64-bit integer) can be stored in an unsigned long long int variable, it is needed to put bits of B into another array in order to work on A and B efficiently.

After that, B is incremented as Bx2, Bx3, Bx4, ... until it is the greatest B less than A. And then (A-B) can be calculated, using some subtraction knowledge for base 2.

Is this the kind of solution that you are looking for?

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That doesn't sound very efficient. It has the potential of taking O(2^128), if B is small and A is large. –  Avi Apr 2 '10 at 11:25
    
The complexity of algorithm can be reduced by incrementing B using left shifting of bytes. It means multiplication by 2 each time. When the B is greater than A, starting from the previous value of B, B can be incremented by initial value of B each time and so on... –  Ahmet Altun Apr 2 '10 at 11:35

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