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The below query picks up 1000 rows due to batch constraints and should fetch only 1000 rows. If I dont use rownum it is taking only 5secs to fetch more than 1000 recs.. but with rownum it is taking 20 secs.

SELECT  E.INFO_ID
FROM TAB1 E LEFT OUTER JOIN TAB2 D
ON E.INFO_ID= D.INFO_ID 
WHERE D.INFO_ID IS NULL AND ROWNUM < 1000;

Please help me on tuning the query without affecting functionality.

share|improve this question
1  
run it in SQL*Plus and prove your words, show us the log you will see after the run – zaratustra Sep 4 '14 at 8:01
    
Please post the EXECUTION PLAN. SET TIME ON TIMING ON in SQL*Plus and prove what you are saying. – Lalit Kumar B Sep 4 '14 at 8:08
    
This happens in 10g and 11g? – Thorsten Kettner Sep 4 '14 at 8:39
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Look at the execution plans. Probably the optimizer thinks that it can get quicker to the first 1000 results by following a different path, wheras for the complete data it uses a hash join or such - which surprisingly turns out to be quick on the first records.

Once you know the execution plans you can use hints to let the optimizer follow the path, which you know from your experience to be better.

Anyhow, you are asking for tab1 records that don't exist in tab2, but rather than saying so with NOT EXISTS, NOT IN or MINUS, you kind of hide this by using a left join. This can be faster sometimes, but it's a trick after all. Why not re-write the query in a more straight-forward way and see how it performs? I think such a statement might be more stable as to slight alterations like using a rownum limit. It's worth a try.

EDIT: Some clarification. You are asking for IDs that exist in tab1 but not in tab2. This would be:

SELECT INFO_ID FROM TAB1 
MINUS
SELECT INFO_ID FROM TAB2;

You can also word the task differently, such as: I want all IDs from tab1 that don't exist in tab2:

SELECT INFO_ID FROM TAB1
WHERE NOT EXISTS 
(
  SELECT * FROM TAB2
  WHERE TAB2.INFO_ID = TAB1.INFO_ID
);

Or: I want all IDs from tab1 that are not in tab2

SELECT INFO_ID FROM TAB1
WHERE INFO_ID NOT IN
(
  SELECT INFO_ID FROM TAB2
);

What you do instead is saying: For every ID in tab1 find all matching IDs in tab2 and combine these. For IDs in tab 1 that have no match in tab2 give me a result record, too. Then from that (probably huge) set of results remove all matches, so that I stay with those IDs that have no match.

Many words to describe the same task. Accordingly the query is not easy to read for people not familiar with this trick technique. The query certainly produces a large intermediate result. So why do people use it though? Database systems grow up with joins, so this is something they are really good in. For example they use hash mechanisms to get the records joined, rather than looping record for record. So in spite of suggesting a rather complicated access way, the left join technique may result in good performance.

However, the queries above are more straight-forward. Let's look at the first; a possible execution plan would be: Order tab1 IDs, Order tab2 IDs, then loop once to keep tab1 IDs withot a tab2 match. Very simple. Sorting takes time, but then you go sequentielly through both results. If this happens to give you the first thousand matches rather quickly, it is likely to do so when you limit the results with ROWNUM < 1000. And the second query? Loop through tab1 and with the id given find a match in tab2, if there is none keep that record. May be fast with an index, and adding ROWNUM < 1000 will probably not change the speed for getting the first records, for the execution path stays the same. Third query: Can be interpreted like the second. Or tab2 IDs are put in an array with fast access somehow. Anyway, the ROWNUM < 1000 is not likely to change much in the access path.

With your query however it is difficult to say. When all records must be regarded ahash join might be fastest. But if only some records suffice, why join everything? Maybe the optimizer decides to go record by record of tab1 and look for a match in tab2 then. This would alter the execution plan extremely and can be much faster for the first 1000 records. It's just not guaranteed to be so and with bad luck as in your case it can even get slower.

Well, after all, Oracle has a great optimizer. Queries get re-written, and your query might get turned into a NOT EXISTS query or vice versa. And even without re-writing: in spite of dealing with different queries, the optimizer can still decide for the same execution plan. So you never know. But it's always worth a try.

My advice: Write straight-forward SQL. Quite often an SQL statement can resemble the task how one would formulate it in words. Just as shown above. Only when facing performance problems think of how to re-write the query to deal with this.

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Hello, The query was straight forward and I rewrite the query as above and is showing me some benifits in terms of perfomance not drastic change. Pls can you throw some light on this.. – Prabhu Sep 5 '14 at 6:15
    
I've added an elaboration. After all it's all up to the optimizer what to make of our queries. Almost always it does a very good job. If it fails, re-write the query or work with hints. – Thorsten Kettner Sep 5 '14 at 7:06
    
Thanks for the Suggestion, Thorsten – Prabhu Sep 5 '14 at 9:37

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