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Using c# 4.0 -- building an interface and a class that implements the interface. I want to declare an optional parameter in the interface and have it be reflected in the class. So, I have the following:

 public interface IFoo
 {
      void Bar(int i, int j=0);
 }

 public class Foo
 {
      void Bar(int i, int j=0) { // do stuff }
 }

This compiles, but it doesn't look right. The interface needs to have the optional parameters, because otherwise it doesn't reflect correctly in the interface method signature.

Should I skip the optional parameter and just use a nullable type? Or will this work as intended with no side effects or consequences?

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4 Answers

up vote 19 down vote accepted

You could consider the pre-optional-parameters alternative:

public interface IFoo
{
    void Bar(int i, int j);
}

public static class FooOptionalExtensions
{
    public static void Bar(this IFoo foo, int i)
    {
        foo.Bar(i, 0);
    }
}

If you don't like the look of a new language feature, you don't have to use it.

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24  
But...it's new! And shiny! :-) –  bryanjonker Apr 2 '10 at 14:52
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Looks aside, that will do exactly what it sounds like you want to accomplish.

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  Craig W. 9 hours ago
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What about something like this?

public interface IFoo
{
    void Bar(int i, int j);
}

public static class IFooExtensions 
{
    public static void Baz(this IFoo foo, int i, int j = 0) 
    {
        foo.Bar(i, j);
    }
}

public class Foo
{
    void Bar(int i, int j) { /* do stuff */ }
}
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@Iznogood - the edit you approved here is clearly not a valid edit: stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/1041521. Please be more careful when reviewing edits. –  LittleBobbyTables Nov 19 '12 at 16:10
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What is really strange is that the value you put for the optional parameter in the interface actually makes a difference. I suppose you have to question whether the value is an interface detail or an implementation detail. I would have said the latter but things behave like the former. The following code outputs 1 5 2 0 for example.

// Output:
// 1 5
// 2 0
namespace ScrapCSConsole
{
    using System;

    interface IMyTest
    {
        void MyTestMethod(int notOptional, int optional = 5);
    }

    class MyTest : IMyTest
    {
        public void MyTestMethod(int notOptional, int optional = 0)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0} {1}", notOptional, optional));
        }
    }

    class Program
    {      
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            IMyTest myTest1 = new MyTest();
            myTest1.MyTestMethod(1);

            MyTest myTest2 = new MyTest();
            myTest2.MyTestMethod(2);
        }
    }   
}

What is kind of interesting is that if your interface makes a parameter optional the class implementing it does not have to do the same:

// Optput:
// 1 5
namespace ScrapCSConsole
{
    using System;

    interface IMyTest
    {
        void MyTestMethod(int notOptional, int optional = 5);
    }

    class MyTest : IMyTest
    {
        public void MyTestMethod(int notOptional, int optional)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0} {1}", notOptional, optional));
        }
    }

    class Program
    {      
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            IMyTest myTest1 = new MyTest();
            myTest1.MyTestMethod(1);

            MyTest myTest2 = new MyTest();
            // The following line won't compile as it does not pass a required
            // parameter.
            //myTest2.MyTestMethod(2);
        }
    }   
}

What seems to be a mistake however is that if you implement the interface explicitly the value you give in the class for the optional value is pointless. How in the following example could you use the value 9? This does not even give a warning when compiling.

// Optput:
// 1 5
namespace ScrapCSConsole
{
    using System;

    interface IMyTest
    {
        void MyTestMethod(int notOptional, int optional = 5);
    }

    class MyTest : IMyTest
    {
        void IMyTest.MyTestMethod(int notOptional, int optional = 9)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0} {1}", notOptional, optional));
        }
    }

    class Program
    {      
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            IMyTest myTest1 = new MyTest();
            myTest1.MyTestMethod(1);

            MyTest myTest2 = new MyTest();
            // The following line won't compile as MyTest method is not available
            // without first casting to IMyTest
            //myTest2.MyTestMethod(2);
        }
    }   
}
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