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I ran into an issue by introducing floating point columns in the MySQL database schema that the comparisons on floating point values don't return the correct results always.

1 - 50.12
2 - 34.57
3 - 12.75
4 - ...(rest all less than 12.00)

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM `users` WHERE `points` > "12.75"

This returns me "3".

I have read that the comparisons of floating point values in MySQL is a bad idea and decimal type is the better option.

Do I have any hope of moving ahead with the float type and get the comparisons to work correctly?

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What kinds of literals are enclosed in double quotation marks in SQL? –  Joey Apr 2 '10 at 15:25
1  
Unfortunately, MySQL allows double quotes to act like single-quotes by default. This feature can be turned off with the ANSI_QUOTES option, which will make them refer to identifiers as per the ANSI SQL standard (like the non-standard backticks in the above query). –  bobince Apr 2 '10 at 15:56
1  
12.75 is exactly representable in binary (1100.11), so I don't see how it passes the test "> 12.75". Are you sure there's no other point > 12.75 in your list? –  Rick Regan Apr 3 '10 at 22:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Do you notice the problem below?

CREATE TABLE a (num float);

INSERT INTO a VALUES (50.12);
INSERT INTO a VALUES (34.57);
INSERT INTO a VALUES (12.75);
INSERT INTO a VALUES (11.22);
INSERT INTO a VALUES (10.46);
INSERT INTO a VALUES (9.35);
INSERT INTO a VALUES (8.55);
INSERT INTO a VALUES (7.23);
INSERT INTO a VALUES (6.53);
INSERT INTO a VALUES (5.15);
INSERT INTO a VALUES (4.01);

SELECT SUM(num) FROM a;
+-----------------+
| SUM(num)        |
+-----------------+
| 159.94000005722 | 
+-----------------+

There's an extra 0.00000005722 spread between some of those rows. Therefore some of those values will return false when compared with the value they were initialized with.

To avoid problems with floating-point arithmetic and comparisons, you should use the DECIMAL data type:

ALTER TABLE a MODIFY num DECIMAL(6,2);

SELECT SUM(num) FROM a;
+----------+
| SUM(num) |
+----------+
|   159.94 | 
+----------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)
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Hey Daniel! thanks. I am considering converting my column type to DECIMAL. –  Sharief Shaik Apr 2 '10 at 16:39
1  
@Sharief: If converting to DECIAML is impossible, the only option I see is to allow some tolerance for floating point comparisons, such that you could write your query as follows: SELECT COUNT(*) FROM users WHERE points > (12.75 + 0.001);... However if accuracy is paramount, fixed point DECIMAL is the way to go. Another alternative to DECIMAL could be using an integer value scaled up to represent your values in terms of hundredths: 5012 instead of 50.12. There may be some situations where this might be appropriate. –  Daniel Vassallo Apr 2 '10 at 16:48
    
I did try adding the tolerance already, exactly the way you mentioned, even then the results were never consistent. –  Sharief Shaik Apr 2 '10 at 19:51

It's a floating point, so what's the problem? 3 could be the correct result, depends on what the database thinks about 12.75. Is it 12.75 or just a little more?

Use DECIMAL if you want exact numbers.

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Hi Frank, can you elaborate on what you mean by "what the database thinks about 12.75". Shall I be in trouble if I tried to compare a two digit precision value with a three digit precision. Like... SELECT COUNT(*) FROM users WHERE points > "12.751" –  Sharief Shaik Apr 2 '10 at 16:35
    
@ShariefShaik I think Decimal should solved that case, from what other user experiences. –  gumuruh Feb 7 '12 at 4:10

There is a problems with comparison of floats for equality. This may give unpredicted results. This is due to internal implementation of floating point arithmetics.

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Comparing a number with a string?

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I did face the similar issue once. Convert the 'float' field to 'decimal'. It'll definitely solve the problem.

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I thought by using precise fixed length of float already solved the problem, so it doesn't?? for example; i define float(4,2). And then I stored value of 12.50, AND THEN I try to compare it with "> 12.50" statement. Wouldn't it still fail? –  gumuruh Feb 7 '12 at 4:08

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