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I'm not sure if this is a bug or if I'm just doing something wrong. If I were to do an HTTP connection like this:

import httplib

http_connection = httplib.HTTPConnection("192.168.192.196")
http_connection.request("GET", "/")
http_connection.sock.settimeout(20)
response = http_connection.getresponse()
data = response.read()
http_connection.close()

Then at a DOS prompt, I do this:

netstat -ano | find /i "192.168.192.196:80" | find /i "ESTABLISHED"

I get nothing.

However, if I do the same thing, but change it to an HTTPSConnection:

import httplib

http_connection = httplib.HTTPSConnection("192.168.192.196")
http_connection.request("GET", "/")
http_connection.sock.settimeout(20)
response = http_connection.getresponse()
data = response.read()
http_connection.close()

Then do this:

netstat -ano | find /i "192.168.192.196:443" | find /i "ESTABLISHED"

I will actually see that the connection remains established until I actually ^Z out of the Python shell.

This is happening in one of the applications I'm responsible for. Python isn't actually hanging there - it's simply leaving the connection open.

Am I doing something wrong here? Do I need extra code to close the HTTPS connection?

This is Python 2.6.4, btw.

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1  
When I try this (on Windows XP using Python 2.6.4), I see the connection goes to CLOSE_WAIT and eventually goes away. Is your server doing something odd? –  Dave Bacher Apr 2 '10 at 17:35
1  
This is weird. If you delete the connection (del http_connection) and run the garbage collector, the connection gets closed. It also works with Python 3.1, maybe because the GC behavior has changed, maybe not... –  AndiDog Apr 2 '10 at 17:38
    
Dave Bacher: No, I don't think the server's doing anything weird. I tried this on a standard HTTPS web server as well and it does the same thing. AndiDog: Running gc.collect() seems to clear the connection... I'm just not sure what the impact of doing that will be. –  Dave Apr 2 '10 at 18:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Turns out that if you send the "Connection: close" HTTP header, this isn't an issue - although I still think that .close() should actually close the connection like it does for HTTPConnection.

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