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Ok, I cannot get this. I've looked at it and I don't see why it's out of bounds. I get the error at paypalItems[paypalItems.Length] = new PaymentDetailsItemType

PaymentDetailsItemType[] paypalItems = new PaymentDetailsItemType[order.OrderItems.Count];

for (int i = 0; i < order.OrderItems.Count; i++)
{

    paypalItems[i] = new PaymentDetailsItemType
    {
        Name = order.OrderItems[i].Name,
        Amount = ApiUtility.CreateBasicAmount(order.OrderItems[i].Price),
        Description = order.OrderItems[i].Name,
        Number = order.OrderItems[i].Sku,
    };
}

// paymentItems now has 1 item...now to the if statement:

if (giftCardsTotal != 0)
{
    // add Coupons & Discounts line item
    paypalItems[paypalItems.Length] = new PaymentDetailsItemType
                                              {
                                                  Name = "Gift Cards",
                                                  Amount = ApiUtility.CreateBasicAmount(giftCardsTotal),
                                                  Description = "Gift Cards"
                                              };
}

UPDATED: I changed the size of the array..now it's all good. No need for the -1

PaymentDetailsItemType[] paypalItems = new PaymentDetailsItemType[order.OrderItems.Count + 1];

            for (int i = 0; i < order.OrderItems.Count; i++)
            {
                paypalItems[i] = new PaymentDetailsItemType
                {
                    Name = order.OrderItems[i].Name,
                    Amount = ApiUtility.CreateBasicAmount(order.OrderItems[i].Price),
                    Description = order.OrderItems[i].Name,
                    Number = order.OrderItems[i].Sku,
                };
            }

        // paymentItems now has 1 item...now to the if statement:

            if (giftCardsTotal != 0)
            {
                paypalItems[paypalItems.Length -1] = new PaymentDetailsItemType
                {
                    Name = "Certificates",
                    Amount = ApiUtility.CreateBasicAmount(giftCardsTotal),
                    Description = "Certificates"
                };
            }
share|improve this question
    
I think you have you're answer given the fast that 5 people responded in one minute with the same answer :) –  Henri Apr 2 '10 at 18:56
    
I am trying to add an additional item. I guess I left that out. –  CoffeeAddict Apr 2 '10 at 19:00
    
No, it's not working Henri, be patient. the problem I got was after using -1, lets say that after the loop paypalItems had only 1 item. So length was 1. If you subtract 1 from that you are telling it to add at index 0. That overrides the value I already had in there from the loop –  CoffeeAddict Apr 2 '10 at 19:01
1  
Which version of .NET are you using? LINQ would make it a snap to fill a List<PaymentDetailsItemType>. –  John Saunders Apr 2 '10 at 19:01
    
I'm not using linq right now, this is an array of a third party proxy type. I just want to stick with traditional here. –  CoffeeAddict Apr 2 '10 at 19:03
show 1 more comment

11 Answers 11

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Because they are 0-indexed, so first one is the 0 and last one is length-1.

This is true for almost any programming language..

It seems that first you fill up an array by trasforming elements from another one and then you want to replace last one. Maybe you intended to append an element to the end?

In that case you should build it larger:

PaymentDetailsItemType[] paypalItems = new PaymentDetailsItemType[order.OrderItems.Count+1];

then fill it as you did:

for (int i = 0; i < order.OrderItems.Count; i++)
{
  ...
}

then set the last one:

paypalItems[paypalItems.Length-1] = ..
share|improve this answer
    
Wrong. In his case he's trying to add an additional element to the already allocated array of size x. –  Gabe Apr 2 '10 at 19:00
    
that's why in my example I allocated it larger (size + 1), to have room for the last one. –  Jack Apr 2 '10 at 19:02
    
+1 If he must use the original logic, then this is the correct answer (the initial array must be created with one additional element than required for the other data). But it would be better to use a List<> and then convert to an array afterward if external API requires the array. –  Kevin Brock Apr 2 '10 at 19:18
    
use [paymentItems.Length -1] and increase size of array by x elements you want to add after the for loop ultimately is the solution. –  CoffeeAddict Apr 2 '10 at 20:55
add comment

I think you might be better off using a List<>, so you would declare:

List<PaymentDetailsItemType> paypalItems = new List<PaymentDetailsItemType>();

Then when you iterate through order.OrderItems, just do a paypalItems.Add()

Finally on your if(giftCardsTotal != 0) conditional just do a:

paypalItems.Add(new PaymentDetailsItemType...);

This way you don't have to worry about off by one array indexing issues. Here would be the rewritten code (I use var for my convenience):

var paypalItems = new List<PaymentDetailsItemType>();

foreach (var orderitem in order.OrderItems)
{
    paypalItems.Add(new PaymentDetailsItemType
    {
        Name = orderitem.Name,
        Amount = ApiUtility.CreateBasicAmount(orderitem.Price),
        Description = orderitem.Name,
        Number = orderitem.Sku,
    });
}

if (giftCardsTotal != 0)
{
    // add Coupons & Discounts line item
    paypalItems.Add(new PaymentDetailsItemType
    {
        Name = "Gift Cards",
        Amount = ApiUtility.CreateBasicAmount(giftCardsTotal),
        Description = "Gift Cards"
    });
}

Per John Saunders' suggestion (in the comments), here's a Linq alterative to the variable declaration and first loop:

var paypalItems = 
    (from orderitem in order.OrderItems
    select new PaymentDetailsItemType
    {
        Name = orderitem.Name,
        Amount = ApiUtility.CreateBasicAmount(orderitem.Price),
        Description = orderitem.Name,
        Number = orderitem.Sku
    }).ToList();

Addition based on comment: If you need an Array when you're done, call:

paypalItems.ToArray()
share|improve this answer
3  
+1 For noticing that the OP's real problem is trying to add an element to an array. –  Steve Guidi Apr 2 '10 at 18:59
1  
@Keltex: good catch. You might also show him how to do it using a projection in LINQ. –  John Saunders Apr 2 '10 at 19:03
1  
@coffeeaddict: If you need to keep the array, List<> has a ToArray function that should work for you. –  Austin Salonen Apr 2 '10 at 19:12
1  
@coffeeaddict: If you're using SOAP, the overhead of the marshalling the array to XML will far exceed the cost of the ToArray() call. –  Keltex Apr 2 '10 at 19:16
1  
@coffeeaddict: try returning the list. SOAP doesn't know the difference between a list and an array. –  John Saunders Apr 2 '10 at 19:17
show 6 more comments

Arrays are zero-based in C#. Using array[array.Length] will always fail. You want Length-1.


In addition, I see that you're trying to expand the array. You can't do that! Once an array is instantiated, it's length cannot change.

If you need a collection that can expand, use List<PaymentDetailsItemType>.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried -1 got the same error –  CoffeeAddict Apr 2 '10 at 18:55
2  
He's trying to add an additional item to the array it looks like to me. –  Gabe Apr 2 '10 at 18:55
    
@coffeeaddict: if you're getting the same error with Length-1, are you certain it's the paypalItems array that's throwing? Perhaps something is throwing in ApiUtility.CreateBasicAmount –  Randolpho Apr 2 '10 at 18:57
    
Nevermind, the problem I got was after using -1, lets say that after the loop paymentItems had only 1 item. So length was 1. If you subtract 1 from that you are telling it to add at index 0. That overrides the value I already had in there from the loop –  CoffeeAddict Apr 2 '10 at 18:59
    
ok, so I need to add that 2nd value at the end of the loop. –  CoffeeAddict Apr 2 '10 at 19:05
add comment
paypalItems[paypalItems.Length] = 

should be

paypalItems[paypalItems.Length - 1] = 
share|improve this answer
    
Wrong. He's trying to add an item to the array of size x. –  Gabe Apr 2 '10 at 18:59
add comment

This:

paypalItems[paypalItems.Length]

Will always be outside the bounds of the array as the array index starts at 0. If you want to store something in the last element of the array do:

paypalItems[paypalItems.Length-1] = ...
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It looks like you're trying to append to the array by simply using the next index. Perhaps you learned this from exposure to a language like javascript or python, where "arrays" are really complex objects. Real arrays don't work like that.

Instead, you should try using the .Add() method of List<PaymentDetailsItemType>.

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You need to change the size of array before add a new array item.

if (giftCardsTotal != 0)

{

// Increase the size
Array.Resize(ref paypalItems, paypalItems.Length + 1);

// add Coupons & Discounts line item
paypalItems[paypalItems.Length -1] = new PaymentDetailsItemType
                                          {
                                              Name = "Gift Cards",
                                              Amount = ApiUtility.CreateBasicAmount(giftCardsTotal),
                                              Description = "Gift Cards"
                                          };

}

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Length starts from 1 and index from 0. So you should try:

paypalItems[paypalItems.Length - 1]
share|improve this answer
    
Wrong. He's trying to add an item to the array of size x –  Gabe Apr 2 '10 at 19:02
add comment

You are initializing the array to the length of order.OrderItems.Count then after filling it up with data, you are trying to add an additional item to the array. This won't work like this. You have allocated a static size to the array here, you can't add an additional item to that without some sort of reallocation.

You need to create a dynamically allocated array or use a List<T>

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To add to the other answers, an Array in .NET is a low-level data type that maps directly to an allocated sequence of bytes in memory. Thus, you cannot add items to an array if it's already full. Maybe what you're looking for is to use a List<T>:

var paypalItems = new List<PaymentDetailsItemType>(order.OrderItems.Count);
// specifying that count is optional, but will increase performance because array space will have to be reallocated less often

// ...
paypalItems.Add(new PaymentDetailsItemType
                                              {
                                                  Name = "Gift Cards",
                                                  Amount = ApiUtility.CreateBasicAmount(giftCardsTotal),
                                                  Description = "Gift Cards"
                                              });
share|improve this answer
add comment

paypalItems[paypalItems.Length] would access one position above the allocated space. If you want the last position you need paypalItems[paypalItems.Length-1]

If you want to append an item use a List<> instead of an array.

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