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is there any straight forward way of finding a key by knowing the value within a dictionary?

all I can think of is this:

key = [i for key,value in dict.items() if value=='value' ][0]

Any ideas?

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i isn't going to be defined here. Perhaps you mean [key for key,value in ... ] –  askewchan May 16 '13 at 19:55
    
possible duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/483666/… –  Tobias Kienzler May 28 '13 at 13:26
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8 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

There is none. Don't forget that the value may be found on any number of keys, including 0 or more than 1.

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python has a .index method on lists the returns the first found index with the specified value or an exception if not found... any reason why such a semantic could not be applied to dictionaries? –  Brian Jack Jun 22 '12 at 15:27
    
@BrianJack: Dictionaries are not ordered, like sets. Look at collections.OrderedDict for an implementation that is ordered. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 24 '12 at 14:40
1  
.index only needs to guarantee that it returns a single value and it does not need to be lexically first only that it be the first match and that it's behavior is stable (multiple calls on same dict over time should yield same matching element). Unless dictionaries rearrange their unmodified hashes over time as other elements get added, removed or modified it would still work suitably. A naive implementation: dictObject.items().index(key) –  Brian Jack Jul 25 '12 at 19:43
    
the point mainly of .index() is that by definition we don't care about duplicates only that we may look up a single element consistently –  Brian Jack Jul 25 '12 at 19:51
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Your list comprehension goes through all the dict's items finding all the matches, then just returns the first key. This generator expression will only iterate as far as necessary to return the first value:

key = (key for key,value in dd.items() if value=='value').next()

where dd is the dict. Will raise StopIteration if no match is found, so you might want to catch that and return a more appropriate exception like ValueError or KeyError.

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Yes It should probably raise same exception as listObject.index(key) when key is not in the list. –  Brian Jack Jul 25 '12 at 19:48
1  
also keys = { key for key,value in dd.items() if value=='value' } to get the set of all keys if several matches. –  askewchan May 16 '13 at 19:57
    
@askewchan - no real need to return this as a set, dict keys already have to be unique, just return a list - or better, return a generator expression, and let the caller put it in whatever container they want. –  Paul McGuire May 19 '13 at 16:17
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There are cases where a dictionary is a one:one mapping

Eg,

d = {1: "one", 2: "two" ...}

Your approach is ok if you are only doing a single lookup. However if you need to do more than one lookup it will be more efficient to create an inverse dictionary

ivd = {v: k for k, v in d.items()}

If there is a possibility of multiple keys with the same value, you will need to specify the desired behaviour in this case.

If your Python is 2.6 or older, you can use

ivd = dict((v, k) for k, v in d.items())
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6  
Nice optimization. But, I think you meant to turn your list of 2-tuples into a dictionary using dict(): ivd=dict([(v,k) for (k,v) in d.items()]) –  hobs Jul 25 '12 at 20:44
    
This works as long as all the values are hashable. –  askewchan May 16 '13 at 19:48
    
@hobs just use a dict comprehension instead of list comprehension: invd = { v:k for k,v in d.items() } –  askewchan May 16 '13 at 19:50
    
@askewchan, thanks I changed it to a dict comprehension –  gnibbler May 16 '13 at 22:00
    
@gnibbler dict comprehensions haven't been migrated back to Python 2.6, so if you want to remain portable you'll need to put up with the 6 extra characters for dict() around a generator of 2-tuples or a list comprehension of 2-tuples –  hobs May 16 '13 at 22:23
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Maybe a dictionary-like class such as DoubleDict down below is what you want? You can use any one of the provided metaclasses in conjuction with DoubleDict or may avoid using any metaclass at all.

import functools
import threading

################################################################################

class _DDChecker(type):

    def __new__(cls, name, bases, classdict):
        for key, value in classdict.items():
            if key not in {'__new__', '__slots__', '_DoubleDict__dict_view'}:
                classdict[key] = cls._wrap(value)
        return super().__new__(cls, name, bases, classdict)

    @staticmethod
    def _wrap(function):
        @functools.wraps(function)
        def check(self, *args, **kwargs):
            value = function(self, *args, **kwargs)
            if self._DoubleDict__forward != \
               dict(map(reversed, self._DoubleDict__reverse.items())):
                raise RuntimeError('Forward & Reverse are not equivalent!')
            return value
        return check

################################################################################

class _DDAtomic(_DDChecker):

    def __new__(cls, name, bases, classdict):
        if not bases:
            classdict['__slots__'] += ('_DDAtomic__mutex',)
            classdict['__new__'] = cls._atomic_new
        return super().__new__(cls, name, bases, classdict)

    @staticmethod
    def _atomic_new(cls, iterable=(), **pairs):
        instance = object.__new__(cls, iterable, **pairs)
        instance.__mutex = threading.RLock()
        instance.clear()
        return instance

    @staticmethod
    def _wrap(function):
        @functools.wraps(function)
        def atomic(self, *args, **kwargs):
            with self.__mutex:
                return function(self, *args, **kwargs)
        return atomic

################################################################################

class _DDAtomicChecker(_DDAtomic):

    @staticmethod
    def _wrap(function):
        return _DDAtomic._wrap(_DDChecker._wrap(function))

################################################################################

class DoubleDict(metaclass=_DDAtomicChecker):

    __slots__ = '__forward', '__reverse'

    def __new__(cls, iterable=(), **pairs):
        instance = super().__new__(cls, iterable, **pairs)
        instance.clear()
        return instance

    def __init__(self, iterable=(), **pairs):
        self.update(iterable, **pairs)

    ########################################################################

    def __repr__(self):
        return repr(self.__forward)

    def __lt__(self, other):
        return self.__forward < other

    def __le__(self, other):
        return self.__forward <= other

    def __eq__(self, other):
        return self.__forward == other

    def __ne__(self, other):
        return self.__forward != other

    def __gt__(self, other):
        return self.__forward > other

    def __ge__(self, other):
        return self.__forward >= other

    def __len__(self):
        return len(self.__forward)

    def __getitem__(self, key):
        if key in self:
            return self.__forward[key]
        return self.__missing_key(key)

    def __setitem__(self, key, value):
        if self.in_values(value):
            del self[self.get_key(value)]
        self.__set_key_value(key, value)
        return value

    def __delitem__(self, key):
        self.pop(key)

    def __iter__(self):
        return iter(self.__forward)

    def __contains__(self, key):
        return key in self.__forward

    ########################################################################

    def clear(self):
        self.__forward = {}
        self.__reverse = {}

    def copy(self):
        return self.__class__(self.items())

    def del_value(self, value):
        self.pop_key(value)

    def get(self, key, default=None):
        return self[key] if key in self else default

    def get_key(self, value):
        if self.in_values(value):
            return self.__reverse[value]
        return self.__missing_value(value)

    def get_key_default(self, value, default=None):
        return self.get_key(value) if self.in_values(value) else default

    def in_values(self, value):
        return value in self.__reverse

    def items(self):
        return self.__dict_view('items', ((key, self[key]) for key in self))

    def iter_values(self):
        return iter(self.__reverse)

    def keys(self):
        return self.__dict_view('keys', self.__forward)

    def pop(self, key, *default):
        if len(default) > 1:
            raise TypeError('too many arguments')
        if key in self:
            value = self[key]
            self.__del_key_value(key, value)
            return value
        if default:
            return default[0]
        raise KeyError(key)

    def pop_key(self, value, *default):
        if len(default) > 1:
            raise TypeError('too many arguments')
        if self.in_values(value):
            key = self.get_key(value)
            self.__del_key_value(key, value)
            return key
        if default:
            return default[0]
        raise KeyError(value)

    def popitem(self):
        try:
            key = next(iter(self))
        except StopIteration:
            raise KeyError('popitem(): dictionary is empty')
        return key, self.pop(key)

    def set_key(self, value, key):
        if key in self:
            self.del_value(self[key])
        self.__set_key_value(key, value)
        return key

    def setdefault(self, key, default=None):
        if key not in self:
            self[key] = default
        return self[key]

    def setdefault_key(self, value, default=None):
        if not self.in_values(value):
            self.set_key(value, default)
        return self.get_key(value)

    def update(self, iterable=(), **pairs):
        for key, value in (((key, iterable[key]) for key in iterable.keys())
                           if hasattr(iterable, 'keys') else iterable):
            self[key] = value
        for key, value in pairs.items():
            self[key] = value

    def values(self):
        return self.__dict_view('values', self.__reverse)

    ########################################################################

    def __missing_key(self, key):
        if hasattr(self.__class__, '__missing__'):
            return self.__missing__(key)
        if not hasattr(self, 'default_factory') \
           or self.default_factory is None:
            raise KeyError(key)
        return self.__setitem__(key, self.default_factory())

    def __missing_value(self, value):
        if hasattr(self.__class__, '__missing_value__'):
            return self.__missing_value__(value)
        if not hasattr(self, 'default_key_factory') \
           or self.default_key_factory is None:
            raise KeyError(value)
        return self.set_key(value, self.default_key_factory())

    def __set_key_value(self, key, value):
        self.__forward[key] = value
        self.__reverse[value] = key

    def __del_key_value(self, key, value):
        del self.__forward[key]
        del self.__reverse[value]

    ########################################################################

    class __dict_view(frozenset):

        __slots__ = '__name'

        def __new__(cls, name, iterable=()):
            instance = super().__new__(cls, iterable)
            instance.__name = name
            return instance

        def __repr__(self):
            return 'dict_{}({})'.format(self.__name, list(self))
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1  
OVERKILL! (I like it!) –  Lepi Feb 12 '13 at 14:45
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This shorter version works identically to yours, even for redundant/ambiguous values (returns the first match), but is probably twice as slow as yours, because it creates a list from the dict twice. And it's only marginally more efficient (16 chars, 26%) in terms of typing speed :)

key = dict.keys()[dict.values().index(value)]
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1  
This is an actual answer to the question. –  Purrell Sep 12 '13 at 18:07
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There isn't one as far as I know of, one way however to do it is to create a dict for normal lookup by key and another dict for reverse lookup by value.

There's an example of such an implementation here:

http://code.activestate.com/recipes/415903-two-dict-classes-which-can-lookup-keys-by-value-an/

This does mean that looking up the keys for a value could result in multiple results which can be returned as a simple list.

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Do note that there are many, many possible values that are not valid keys. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Apr 2 '10 at 19:28
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Through values in dictionary can be object of any kind they can't be hashed or indexed other way. So finding key by the value is unnatural for this collection type. Any query like that can be executed in O(n) time only. So if this is frequent task you should take a look for some indexing of key like Jon sujjested or maybe even some spatial index (DB or http://pypi.python.org/pypi/Rtree/ ).

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I know this might be considered 'wasteful', but in this scenario I often store the key as an additional column in the value record:

d = {'key1' : ('key1', val, val...), 'key2' : ('key2', val, val...) }

it's a tradeoff and feels wrong, but it's simple and works and of course depends on values being tuples rather than simple values.

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assuming I do this, can you explain how it is going to help me in doing a reverse lookup? –  Mahesh Jan 17 '13 at 14:20
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