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Here is a simplified version of something I'm trying to run:

for (var i = 0; i < results.length; i++) {
    marker = results[i];
    google.maps.event.addListener(marker, 'click', function() { 
        change_selection(i);
    }); 
}

but I'm finding that every listener uses the value of results.length (the value when the for loop terminates). How can I add listeners such that each uses the value of i at the time I add it, rather than the reference to i?

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possible duplicate of Javascript closure inside loops - simple practical example –  rds Jan 25 '13 at 14:37

6 Answers 6

up vote 101 down vote accepted

You need to create a separate scope that saves the variable in its current state by passing it as a function parameter:

for (var i = 0; i < results.length; i++) {
  (function (i) {
    marker = results[i];
    google.maps.event.addListener(marker, 'click', function() { 
      change_selection(i);
    }); 
  })(i);
}

By creating an anonymous function and calling it with the variable as the first argument, you're passing-by-value to the function and creating a closure.

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4  
ah, you beat me to it! –  David Murdoch Apr 2 '10 at 20:26
4  
@David Murdoch: happens to all of us! +1 for your answer. –  Andy E Apr 2 '10 at 20:28
2  
You'll want to add var before marker to not pollute the global namespace. –  ThiefMaster Mar 9 '11 at 14:48
2  
@ThiefMaster: strangely enough, I just thought the same thing after looking at this answer for the first time in a while. However, looking at the OP's code, we can't be entirely sure that marker isn't already a global variable. –  Andy E Mar 9 '11 at 14:50
1  
@John: one of JSLint's overzealous warnings, IMO. Adhering to Crockford's laws of writing JavaScript is completely optional, which is why I use JSHint with most warnings that assume I might not understand the code I'm writing switched off. Sadly, this is the second time in as many weeks someone's brought this up on one of my answers, but thankfully you're not so far gone as to have down voted me for it in an effort to force others to adhere to Crockford's coding ideals. ;-) –  Andy E May 14 at 12:18

As well as the closures, you can use function.bind:

google.maps.event.addListener(marker, 'click', change_selection.bind(null, i));

passes the value of i in as an argument to the function when called. (null is for binding this, which you don't need in this case.)

function.bind was introduced by the Prototype framework and has been standardised in ECMAScript Fifth Edition. Until browsers all support it natively, you can add your own function.bind support using closures:

if (!('bind' in Function.prototype)) {
    Function.prototype.bind= function(owner) {
        var that= this;
        var args= Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 1);
        return function() {
            return that.apply(owner,
                args.length===0? arguments : arguments.length===0? args :
                args.concat(Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments, 0))
            );
        };
    };
}
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1  
Just noticed this, +1. I'm quite a fan of bind and can't wait for the native implementations to roll out. –  Andy E Apr 18 '10 at 16:49
    
Thanks for sharing this. –  Allain Lalonde Jun 25 '10 at 18:09
    
What browsers support this? Any mobile browsers? –  NoBugs May 5 '12 at 7:22
2  
@NoBugs: currently: IE9+. Fx4+, recent Chrome and Opera versions. Not Safari, not iPhone, Android browser has it since Ice Cream Sandwich. –  bobince May 5 '12 at 19:39

closures:

for (var i = 0, l= results.length; i < l; i++) {
    marker = results[i];
    (function(index){
        google.maps.event.addListener(marker, 'click', function() { 
            change_selection(index);
        }); 
    })(i);
}

EDIT, 2013: These are now commonly referred to as an IIFE

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You're winding up with a closure. Here's an article on closures and how to work with them. Check out Example 5 on the page; that's the scenario you're dealing with.

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for (var i = 0; i < results.length; i++) {
    marker = results[i];
    google.maps.event.addListener(marker, 'click', (function(i) {
        return function(){
            change_selection(i);
        }
    })(i)); 
}
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3  
this would be a better answer if you explained why it works. –  Kate Gregory May 17 at 16:04

I think we can define a temporary variable to store the value of i.

for (var i = 0; i < results.length; i++) {
 var marker = results[i];
 var j = i;
 google.maps.event.addListener(marker, 'click', function() { 
   change_selection(j);
 }); 
}

I haven't tested it though.

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2  
no, it does not work –  newacct Jun 7 '12 at 2:10
3  
The reason this won't work is that JavaScript lacks block-level scoping. All scoping is function-level. You can only create a new scope by calling a function, which is what we see in the other answers. Without calling a function for each iteration of the loop, there is no way to provide a different closure to each map-event-listener callback. This is a problem that's solved transparently for you whenever you use an iteration-helper like $.each() or _.each(). –  Cory Apr 5 '13 at 11:57

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