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How can I do this cleanly without gotos?

loop:
  if(condition1){
    something();
  } else if (condition2) {
    somethingDifferent();
  } else {
    mostOfTheWork();
    goto loop;
  }

I'd prefer not to use breaks as well. Furthermore, it is expected to loop several (adv 40) times before doing something else, so the mostOfTheWork part would most likely be as high up as possible, even if just for readability. Thanks in advance.

EDIT: This was posted under the misconception that the compiler optimizer worked poorly with breaks, which, while generally stupid to begin with, I have proven incorrect to myself through experimentation (of performance). On the other hand, thank you for your answers; they have been interesting reads on varying styles.

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1  
any particular language; Ruby, PHP, C#, Java, etc? –  Kane Apr 2 '10 at 21:33
5  
Why not use breaks? That's what they're there for, and required for this case, unless I'm just not that clever, which is probably the case. As a side note: may want to put what language this is, might matter. –  Nick Craver Apr 2 '10 at 21:34
1  
Please state your requirements for not using breaks. It is, generally, apart of the language and legal to use, so why not use them? –  Nathan Adams Apr 2 '10 at 21:35
    
Yeah, seriously, why no break? Is this for school or something? –  SamB Apr 2 '10 at 22:15
    
Out of curiosity, what made you think that compiler optimization would work poorly with breaks? –  Stephen Canon Apr 2 '10 at 23:33
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7 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Clearly, you will break out of the loop if either condition fires.

    while ((!condition1) && (!condition2)) {
      MostOfTheWork();
    }
    if (condition1) {
      something();
    } else if (condition2) {
      somethingDifferent();
    }

So, loop while neither condition has fired, then see which one got you.

Now, someone will scream that I evaluated the conditions more than I needed to. For their benefit, a modified version:

{
  bool t1, t2;
  while ((!(t1 = condition1)) && (!(t2 =condition2))) {
    MostOfTheWork();
  }
  if (t1) {
    something();
  } else if (t2) {
    somethingDifferent();
  }
}
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1  
+1 I think this is the solution displaying the sharpest observation. –  fireeyedboy Apr 2 '10 at 21:42
1  
@Yacoby: Nope! Recall that the C and C++ standards are very explicit in requiring that && do short-circuit evaluation. If the first branch of an &&-expression fires, the second branch is not evaluated. –  John R. Strohm Apr 2 '10 at 21:55
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bool done = false ;

while( !done ) {
  if(condition1){
    something();
    done = true ;
  } else if (condition2) {
    somethingDifferent();
    done = true ;
  } else {
    mostOfTheWork();
  }
} 
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Darn. You typed faster, good work. Nice to know that I came up with the same solution though. –  Jed Daniels Apr 2 '10 at 21:36
    
;) But I'm a slow typist. –  tpdi Apr 2 '10 at 21:41
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Without breaks?

function foo(){
  if(condition1){
    something();
    return;
  } else if (condition2) {
    somethingDifferent();
    return;
  }
  mostOfTheWork();
  foo(); //(Tail recursive for those worried about stack overflows)
}

However, breaks are there for flow control, they are much clearer as to what they do than goto, so I would recommend using them. However in this case I would recommend @John's answer as the correct way to do it.

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+1 now explain recursion ;) –  Byron Whitlock Apr 2 '10 at 21:36
1  
to understand recursion yada yada yada... –  fireeyedboy Apr 2 '10 at 21:37
1  
Not all languages will optimize tail calls. This could still cause stack overflow in many languages. –  R Samuel Klatchko Apr 2 '10 at 22:24
    
@R Samuel Very true. –  Yacoby Apr 2 '10 at 22:41
    
In this, the tenth year of the 21st century, a "production quality" compiler that does not optimize tail calls is hopelessly brain-dead. The idea has been around for more than three decades: read the "Lambda: the Ultimate ..." series of MIT AI Lab memos. –  John R. Strohm Apr 3 '10 at 14:38
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No gotos or beaks. Cleaniless as always, subjective

 do {
   if ( condition1 )
     something();
   else if( condition2 )
     somethingElse();
   else
     mostOfTheWork();
 } while( !(condition1 || condition2) );

This is of course, incredibly silly. Just use a break.

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Since you weren't specific about a language, some languages have continue, next or skip that you can use in place of that goto.

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do
{
  if(condition1){
    something();
  } else if (condition2) {
    somethingDifferent();
  } else {
    mostOfTheWork();
  }
} while (!condition1 && !condition2)
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You've probably had it drilled into your head by CS professors that it's bad and will wreak havoc in your code. Gotos are actually quite efficient when used properly and purposely. This is why most programming languages haven't dropped it.

In your particular case, the goto is fine because the block of code is small and you can easily see the program flow. You can write spaghetti code with other control structures too, although it's a little harder to do.

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