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Context: I'm working on master adding a simple feature. After a few minutes I realize it was not so simple and it should have been better to work into a new branch.

This always happens to me and I have no idea how to switch to another branch and take all these uncommited changes with me leaving the master branch clean. I supposed git stash && git stash branch new_branch would simply accomplish that but this is what I get:

~/test $ git status
# On branch master
nothing to commit (working directory clean)

~/test $ echo "hello!" > testing 

~/test $ git status
# On branch master
# Changed but not updated:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#   modified:   testing
#
no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")

~/test $ git stash
Saved working directory and index state WIP on master: 4402b8c testing
HEAD is now at 4402b8c testing

~/test $ git status
# On branch master
nothing to commit (working directory clean)

~/test $ git stash branch new_branch
Switched to a new branch 'new_branch'
# On branch new_branch
# Changed but not updated:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#   modified:   testing
#
no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")
Dropped refs/stash@{0} (db1b9a3391a82d86c9fdd26dab095ba9b820e35b)

~/test $ git s
# On branch new_branch
# Changed but not updated:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#   modified:   testing
#
no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")

~/test $ git checkout master
M   testing
Switched to branch 'master'

~/test $ git status
# On branch master
# Changed but not updated:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#   modified:   testing
#
no changes added to commit (use "git add" and/or "git commit -a")

Do you know if there is any way of accomplishing this?

share|improve this question
    
Although there is a simpler solution to your problem, could you specify in what the result you get differs from what you wanted? –  Gauthier Apr 2 '10 at 22:41
    
by doing the above or the answers at the bottom, the uncommited changes are on both master and the new branch. I want them only on the new branch, so I can checkout master and work on another thing without having these changes floating around –  knoopx Apr 2 '10 at 22:56
1  
see my edited answer. You need to commit your local changes on the new branch if you want to checkout a clean master. Local changes are only the differences between the current HEAD and your files on disk. These changes on local files are not versioned, you need to tell git to save them somewhere if you want to retrieve them later on. –  Gauthier Apr 2 '10 at 23:07
3  
possible duplicate of Move existing, uncommited work to a new branch in Git –  CL. Feb 9 '13 at 8:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 373 down vote accepted

No need to stash.

git checkout -b new_branch_name

does not touch your local changes. It just creates the branch from the current HEAD and sets the HEAD there. So I guess that's what you want.

--- Edit to explain the result of checkout master ---

Are you confused because checkout master does not discard your changes?

Since the changes are only local, git does not want you to lose them too easily. Upon changing branch, git does not overwrite your local changes. The result of your checkout master is:

M   testing

, which means that your working files are not clean. git did change the HEAD, but did not overwrite your local files. That is why your last status still show your local changes, although you are on master.

If you really want to discard the local changes, you have to force the checkout with -f.

git checkout master -f

Since your changes were never committed, you'd lose them.

Try to get back to your branch, commit your changes, then checkout the master again.

git checkout new_branch
git commit -a -m"edited"
git checkout master
git status

You should get a M message after the first checkout, but then not anymore after the checkout master, and git status should show no modified files.

--- Edit to clear up confusion about working directory (local files)---

In answer to your first comment, local changes are just... well, local. Git does not save them automatically, you must tell it to save them for later. If you make changes and do not explicitly commit or stash them, git will not version them. If you change HEAD (checkout master), the local changes are not overwritten since unsaved.

share|improve this answer
6  
The confusing thing here is, that git’s man page states that git checkout “Updates files in the working tree to match the version in the index or the specified tree.”. That assumes your changes in your file system will be GONE afterwards. Without any chance to get them back. Even if you say they won’t, this still leaves a very bad feeling. I don’t trust this at all. Either the documentation is really bad or git’s default behavior is really dangerous. One should not have to trust on some “automagic” heuristic to detect that in this case you don’t want to lose your changes. –  Evi1M4chine Aug 14 '13 at 16:48
4  
If you are checking out a commit which would overwrite your local changes (if the history between the current commit and the target commit touches your locally modified files), git refuses. Only if checkout does not conflict with your local changes, the checkout works and leaves the local changes alone. I do understand the bad feeling though, the man page should maybe say "Updates unmodified files in the working tree". Git does not on the other hand make it too easy to lose local changes. git checkout either lets your local changes alone, or refuses if there is a conflict. –  Gauthier Aug 22 '13 at 9:26
1  
This works wonderfully for me - Thanks! x –  Danny Oct 22 '13 at 14:06
1  
well, how would I checkout to another branch without bringing the local changes there? –  Alexander Supertramp Apr 23 at 4:13
1  
@Alex git checkout <other_branch> -f. You will lose your local changes without warning. –  Gauthier Apr 23 at 14:40

Try:

git stash
git checkout -b new-branch
git stash apply
share|improve this answer
    
Is this different to just doing 'git checkout -b new-branch' by itself? –  Adrian Mouat Jul 11 '13 at 10:09
    
I don't think it was when the answer was originally written, but I could be wrong. Unfortunately due to my working circumstance, I've been using perforce for the last few years so I cannot attest to it's accuracy now. –  Grant Limberg Jul 12 '13 at 4:07
    
Or instead of the last two steps: git stash branch new-branch –  rethab Jul 9 at 5:26

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