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It seems like EclipseLink has been chosen by sun as the reference implementation of JPA 2.0, nevertheless I see lots of people continue to use hibernate...

I have no experience with any of them, so I wonder which one should I choose for a new project...

I'd like to know the pros / cons of each one...

thanks a lot

ps: btw, and this is part of the answer, there are 3636 questions on stackoverflow about hibernate, and only 68 about eclipselink...

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3  
Hey, you don't have a not so good point there ;-), fixed it... –  opensas Apr 3 '10 at 23:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 37 down vote accepted

I'd like to know the pros / cons of each one

  • Both fully support JSR-317 (JPA 2.0) now.
  • Hibernate is definitely the JPA provider with the largest community and is widely used/tested.
  • EclipseLink requires a bytecode enhancement step (while Hibernate uses dynamic proxies).
  • I'm pretty sure they both have features for which the other doesn't have equivalent.
  • Both have specific extensions that you may find interesting if you don't mind making your app less portable.
  • You should bench your application with both of them.
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"EclipseLink requires a bytecode enhancement step". If you mean dynamic or static weaving, this isn't true. Weaving is completely optional (if you mean something different, elaborate). –  MRalwasser Jul 17 '13 at 20:07

Hibernate is more popular. It will be easier for you to find help and answers with it because of this. Hibernate came well before JPA.

EclipseLink is, as you say, the reference implementation of JPA 2.0. That counts for something. Also it seems EclipseLink can do some useful things that Hibernate has no equivalent for (batch queries spring to mind).

I used EclipseLink quite a bit and found it to be pretty good with better documentation than Hibernate.

Ultimately however there is no wrong choice here.

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Not sure this is a direct equivalent but Hibernate has a @org.hibernate.annotations.BatchSize annotation (yeah, it's an extension). –  Pascal Thivent Apr 2 '10 at 23:17
    
also note that the eclipselink maven artifacts are not available from central maven –  rmuller Sep 14 '12 at 17:45
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It's not easier to find help and answers on hibernate. –  Shwetanka Nov 5 '12 at 5:48

As I'm a "TopLink" user since 2001, I might be a little biased (eclipseLink is based on an open-sourced version of TopLink).

Back then, in the days before JPA, we used both Hibernate and TopLink in different projects, and already then, TopLink was by far the more feature-rich, better documented, better performing, more advanced, and cleaner ORM solution. They already had a criteria query API back then, and sophisticated caching and multi-tier options. Hibernate always had that feel of a minimal approach to it. We used it sometimes in small projects because it was simple, it was open source and available free of charge, which TopLink wasn't at that point.

While Hibernate has certainly advanced now that both are implementing the JPA standard, I think it still fair to say that eclipseLink is architecturally much cleaner, and more advanced in adherence to the JPA standard (which is fair enough because it is the reference implementation). In fact, many concepts in JPA seem to have been inspired by TopLink, and not the other way round, while Hibernate had to undergo massive changes in order to support JPA and almost got lost in the JDO/JPA confusion. This has led to stability issues and a certain impedance mismatch between the original "Hibernate Way" to do things and what is specified in JPA.

I don't see why bytecode processing is a con for eclipseLink, it actually works pretty well and allows developers to use eclipseLink in a really transparent fashion. And if you don't like it, you can just turn it off.

EclipseLink also offers a load of additional options beyond the JPA specification, which may or may not become part of the spec in later versions. Think of declarative exposure of JPA entities as JAX-RS restful webservices etc.

The Hibernate community may still be larger than eclipseLink's, just because eclipseLink isn't in the open source for as long as Hibernate, but documentation and community support is pretty good for eclipseLink as well, and it is growing. And eclipseLink's predecessor has been proven over a decade in a wide range of enterprise-grade Java projects.

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You should be using the JPA provider that comes with your target container.

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