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I am a C# programmer but dabbling in VB.Net because everybody else in my team uses it. In the interests of professional development I would like to shrink the following If... Else... statement.

If cmd.Parameters("@whenUpdated").Equals(DBNull.Value) Then
    item.WhenUpdated = Nothing
Else
    item.WhenUpdated = cmd.Parameters("@whenUpdated").Value
End If

I appreciate examples are already available however I can not get it working for this specific case.

Cheers, Ian.

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1  
While not very obvious, this is almost a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/576431/… –  Jørn Schou-Rode Apr 2 '10 at 22:42
1  
Isn't that the wrong way around? –  Mark Byers Apr 2 '10 at 22:42
    
Thank you I saw that question but didn't understand how to apply it in this situation. I see you have voted to close. That's fine I have the answer I need. –  Ian Roke Apr 2 '10 at 22:43
    
@Mark it is I am working very late I apologise I will turn it round. –  Ian Roke Apr 2 '10 at 22:44
    
Welcome to the dark side :-) –  CResults Apr 2 '10 at 22:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Use If as a function rather than a statement:

item.WhenUpdated = If(cmd.Parameters("@whenUpdated").Equals(DBNull.Value), cmd.Parameters("@whenUpdated").Value, Nothing)
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Works exactly as required. Many thanks. –  Ian Roke Apr 2 '10 at 22:46
    
You still have to put this twice cmd.Parameters("@whenUpdated").Value. Why not write a DBNull2Nothing function? Make it much shorter & self documenting? –  MarkJ Apr 3 '10 at 17:43

Similar to the ternary operator in C#, VB has the IIF function.

item.WhenUpdated = IIF(cmd.Parameters("@whenUpdated").Equals(DBNull.Value),
                            cmd.Parameters("@whenUpdated").Value, 
                            Nothing)

If the first argument (the boolean expression) evaluates to true, then the second argument is returned from the function. If the first argument is false, then the third argument is returned.

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2  
The IIf function doesn't short-circuit and returns type Object, which must be cast. As long as you're using VB2008, it's better to use the new If ternary operator instead. –  Dan Story Apr 2 '10 at 22:43
    
Good to know. I dropped VB a few years back and haven't done much with it since. –  womp Apr 2 '10 at 22:45
    
I'm turning green with envy. –  Dan Story Apr 2 '10 at 22:48
    
Some people have all the luck! –  Ian Roke Apr 2 '10 at 22:51
item.WhenUpdated = Nothing
If cmd.Parameters("@whenUpdated").Equals(DBNull.Value) Then
    item.WhenUpdated = cmd.Parameters("@whenUpdated").Value
End If

Only 1 line, but still shorter.

The IF function is definitely the shortest, but not the most readable.

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1  
You could also put the =Nothing at the declaration, so Dim WhenUpdated as Date = Nothing. That'd save another line :-) –  CResults Apr 2 '10 at 22:46
    
I can't do that @CResults as it is a data object. ;-) –  Ian Roke Apr 2 '10 at 22:48
    
Well I could... :-) –  Ian Roke Apr 2 '10 at 22:49

One less line

item.WhenUpdated = Nothing
If cmd.Parameters("@whenUpdated").Equals(DBNull.Value) Then
    item.WhenUpdated = cmd.Parameters("@whenUpdated").Value
End If
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Use the operator If(...) if you want short-circuiting behavior.

Use the function IIf(...) if you don't want short-circuiting behavior.

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