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I know the question is not too specific.

All I want is someone to tell me how to convert a normal merge sort into an in-place merge sort (or a merge sort with constant extra space overhead).

All I can find (on the net) is pages saying "it is too complex" or "out of scope of this text".

The only known ways to merge in-place (without any extra space) are too complex to be reduced to practical program. (taken from here)

Even if it is too complex, what is the basic concept of how to make the merge sort in-place?

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Nice question, I asked that myself when reading through a question from yesterday: stackoverflow.com/questions/2566459/… –  Chris Lercher Apr 3 '10 at 11:31
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8 Answers

Including its "big result", this paper describes a couple of variants of in-place merge sort (PDF):

http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.22.5514&rep=rep1&type=pdf

In-place sorting with fewer moves

Jyrki Katajainen, Tomi A. Pasanen

It is shown that an array of n elements can be sorted using O(1) extra space, O(n log n / log log n) element moves, and n log 2 n+O(n log log n) comparisons. This is the first in-place sorting algorithm requiring o(n log n) moves in the worst case while guaranteeing O(n log n) comparisons, but due to the constant factors involved the algorithm is predominantly of theoretical interest.

I think this is relevant too. I have a printout of it lying around, passed on to me by a colleague, but I haven't read it. It seems to cover basic theory, but I'm not familiar enough with the topic to judge how comprehensively:

http://comjnl.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/38/8/681

Optimal Stable Merging

Antonios Symvonis

This paper shows how to stably merge two sequences A and B of sizes m and n, m ≤ n, respectively, with O(m+n) assignments, O(mlog(n/m+1)) comparisons and using only a constant amount of additional space. This result matches all known lower bounds...

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Knuth left this as an exercise (Vol 3, 5.2.5). There do exists in-place merge sort. It must be implemented carefully.

First, naive in-place merge such as described here: (http://penguin.ewu.edu/cscd300/Topic/AdvSorting/MergeSorts/InPlace.html) isn't the right solution. It downgrades the performance to O(N^2).

The idea is to sort part of the array while using the rest as working area for merging. For example as the following merge function.

void wmerge(Key* xs, int i, int m, int j, int n, int w) {
    while (i < m && j < n)
        swap(xs, w++, xs[i] < xs[j] ? i++ : j++);
    while (i < m)
        swap(xs, w++, i++);
    while (j < n)
        swap(xs, w++, j++);
}  

It takes the array xs, the two sorted sub arrays are represented as range [i, m) and [j, n) respectively. The working area starts from w. Compare with the standard merge algorithm given in most textbooks, this one exchange the contents between the sorted sub array and the working area. As the result, the previous working area contains the merged sorted elements, while the previous elements stored in working area are moved to the two sub arrays.

However, there are two constrains must be satisfied:

  1. The work area should be within the bound of the array. In other words, it should be big enough to hold elements exchanged in without causing any out-of-bound error;
  2. The work area can be overlapped with either of the two sorted arrays, however, it should be ensured that there are not any unmerged elements being overwritten;

With this merging algorithm defined, it's easy to imagine a solution, which can sort half of the array; The next question is, how to deal with the rest of the unsort part stored in work area as shown below:

... unsorted 1/2 array ... | ... sorted 1/2 array ...

One intuitive idea is to recursive sort another half of the working area, thus there are only 1/4 elements haven't been sorted yet.

... unsorted 1/4 array ... | sorted 1/4 array B | sorted 1/2 array A ...

The key point at this stage is that we must merge the sorted 1/4 elements B with the sorted 1/2 elements A sooner or later.

Is the working area left, which only holds 1/4 elements, big enough to merge A and B? Unfortunately, it isn't.

However, the second constraint mentioned above gives us a hint, that we can exploit it by arranging the working area to overlap with either sub array if we can ensure the merging sequence that the unmerged elements won't be overwritten.

Actually, instead of sorting the second half of the working area, we can sort the first half, and put the working area between the two sorted arrays like this:

... sorted 1/4 array B | unsorted work area | ... sorted 1/2 array A ...

This setup effects arrange the work area overlap with the sub array A. This idea is proposed in [Jyrki Katajainen, Tomi Pasanen, Jukka Teuhola. ``Practical in-place mergesort''. Nordic Journal of Computing, 1996].

So the only thing left is to repeat the above step, which reduce the working area from 1/2,, 1/4, 1/8 ..., When the working area becomes small enough, for example, only two elements left, we can switch to a trivial insertion sort to end this algorithm.

Here is the implementation in ANSI C based on this paper.

void imsort(Key* xs, int l, int u);

void swap(Key* xs, int i, int j) {
    Key tmp = xs[i]; xs[i] = xs[j]; xs[j] = tmp;
}

/* 
 * sort xs[l, u), and put result to working area w. 
 * constraint, len(w) == u - l
 */
void wsort(Key* xs, int l, int u, int w) {
    int m;
    if (u - l > 1) {
        m = l + (u - l) / 2;
        imsort(xs, l, m);
        imsort(xs, m, u);
        wmerge(xs, l, m, m, u, w);
    }
    else
        while (l < u)
            swap(xs, l++, w++);
}

void imsort(Key* xs, int l, int u) {
    int m, n, w;
    if (u - l > 1) {
        m = l + (u - l) / 2;
        w = l + u - m;
        wsort(xs, l, m, w); /* the last half contains sorted elements */
        while (w - l > 2) {
            n = w;
            w = l + (n - l + 1) / 2;
            wsort(xs, w, n, l);  /* the first half of the previous working area contains sorted elements */
            wmerge(xs, l, l + n - w, n, u, w);
        }
        for (n = w; n > l; --n) /*switch to insertion sort*/
            for (m = n; m < u && xs[m] < xs[m-1]; ++m)
                swap(xs, m, m - 1);
    }
}

Where wmerge is defined previously.

The full source code can be found here in: https://github.com/liuxinyu95/AlgoXY/blob/algoxy/sorting/merge-sort/src/mergesort.c

And the detailed explanation can be found here: https://sites.google.com/site/algoxy/dcsort/dcsort-en.pdf

By the way, this version isn't the fast merge sort because it needs more swap operations. According to my test, it's faster than the standard version, which allocates extra spaces in every recursion. But it's slower than the optimized version, which doubles the original array in advance, and uses it for further merging.

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The critical step is getting the merge itself to be in-place. It's not as difficult as those sources make out, but you lose something when you try.

Looking at one step of the merge:

[...list-sorted...|x...list-A...|y...list-B...]

We know that the sorted sequence is less than everything else, that x is less than everything else in A, and that y is less than everything else in B. In the case where x is less than or equal to y, you just move your pointer to the start of A on one. In the case where y is less than x, you've got to shuffle y past the whole of A to sorted. That last step is what makes this expensive (except in degenerate cases).

It's generally cheaper (especially when the arrays only actually contain single words per element, e.g., a pointer to a string or structure) to trade off some space for time and have a separate temporary array that you sort back and forth between.

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Your in-place merge has O(m*n) worst-case complexity, where m is A size, and n is B size. This is the case when the first item in A is larger than the last item in B. The complexity can be improved to O(k*log(k)+m+n), where k=min(m,n) by adding a heap between A and B. This heap should contain items from A, which are larger the remaining items in B, but smaller than the remaining items in A. If A is exhausted first, then the heap must be moved to the end of B. Otherwise the heap must be moved to the beginning of A. Then heap items must be popped out in-place and reversed to complete the merge. –  valyala Feb 8 '12 at 15:19
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It really isn't easy or efficient, and I suggest you don't do it unless you really have to (and you probably don't have to unless this is homework since the applications of inplace merging are mostly theoretical). Can't you use quicksort instead? Quicksort will be faster anyway with a few simpler optimizations and its extra memory is O(log N).

Anyway, if you must do it then you must. Here's what I found: one and two. I'm not familiar with the inplace merge sort, but it seems like the basic idea is to use rotations to facilitate merging two arrays without using extra memory.

Note that this is slower even than the classic merge sort that's not inplace.

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Quicksort isn't stable. That really matters for a lot of production code. –  Donal Fellows Apr 3 '10 at 11:29
3  
quicksort can be stable, and iirc merge sort is not necessarily stable if in place –  jk. Apr 3 '10 at 17:31
    
Good links. Why did someone say, it was difficult? –  user373215 Aug 8 '10 at 20:42
1  
@jk: Quicksort isn't stable; it's speed derives from that and you shouldn't try to claim otherwise. It's a very good trade-off. Yes, it's possible to associate the original index with the rest of the key so that you've never got two elements the same, giving a stable sort; that comes at a necessary cost of some extra space (linear in the number of elements) because you can't maintain the relative order of “equivalent” elements otherwise without resorting to extra element movements which destroy performance. –  Donal Fellows Dec 29 '10 at 12:56
1  
Quicksort also has a O(n^2) worst case for specially crafted input –  HoboBen May 10 '11 at 14:37
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Just for reference, here is a nice implementation of a stable in-place merge sort. Complicated, but not too bad.

I ended up implementing both a stable in-place merge sort and a stable in-place quicksort in Java. Please note the complexity is O(n (log n)^2)

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This is my C version:

void mergesort(int *a, int len) {
  int temp, listsize, xsize;

  for (listsize = 1; listsize <= len; listsize*=2) {
    for (int i = 0, j = listsize; (j+listsize) <= len; i += (listsize*2), j += (listsize*2)) {
      merge(& a[i], listsize, listsize);
    }
  }

  listsize /= 2;

  xsize = len % listsize;
  if (xsize > 1)
    mergesort(& a[len-xsize], xsize);

  merge(a, listsize, xsize);
}

void merge(int *a, int sizei, int sizej) {
  int temp;
  int ii = 0;
  int ji = sizei;
  int flength = sizei+sizej;

  for (int f = 0; f < (flength-1); f++) {
    if (sizei == 0 || sizej == 0)
      break;

    if (a[ii] < a[ji]) {
      ii++;
      sizei--;
    }
    else {
      temp = a[ji];

      for (int z = (ji-1); z >= ii; z--)
        a[z+1] = a[z];  
      ii++;

      a[f] = temp;

      ji++;
      sizej--;
    }
  }
}
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Note that this implementation takes Θ(n^2 log n) time in the worst case (reversed array). –  martinkunev Feb 5 at 23:39
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There is a relatively simple implementation of in-place merge sort using Kronrod's original technique but with simpler implementation. A pictorial example that illustrates this technique can be found here: http://www.logiccoder.com/TheSortProblem/BestMergeInfo.htm.

There are also links to more detailed theoretical analysis by the same author associated with this link.

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this link results in a 403 –  choc Apr 21 '13 at 14:53
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An example of bufferless mergesort in C.

#define SWAP(type, a, b) \
    do { type t=(a);(a)=(b);(b)=t; } while (0)

static void reverse_(int* a, int* b)
{
    for ( --b; a < b; a++, b-- )
       SWAP(int, *a, *b);
}
static int* rotate_(int* a, int* b, int* c)
/* swap the sequence [a,b) with [b,c). */
{
    if (a != b && b != c)
     {
       reverse_(a, b);
       reverse_(b, c);
       reverse_(a, c);
     }
    return a + (c - b);
}

static int* lower_bound_(int* a, int* b, const int key)
/* find first element not less than @p key in sorted sequence or end of
 * sequence (@p b) if not found. */
{
    int i;
    for ( i = b-a; i != 0; i /= 2 )
     {
       int* mid = a + i/2;
       if (*mid < key)
          a = mid + 1, i--;
     }
    return a;
}
static int* upper_bound_(int* a, int* b, const int key)
/* find first element greater than @p key in sorted sequence or end of
 * sequence (@p b) if not found. */
{
    int i;
    for ( i = b-a; i != 0; i /= 2 )
     {
       int* mid = a + i/2;
       if (*mid <= key)
          a = mid + 1, i--;
     }
    return a;
}

static void ip_merge_(int* a, int* b, int* c)
/* inplace merge. */
{
    int n1 = b - a;
    int n2 = c - b;

    if (n1 == 0 || n2 == 0)
       return;
    if (n1 == 1 && n2 == 1)
     {
       if (*b < *a)
          SWAP(int, *a, *b);
     }
    else
     {
       int* p, * q;

       if (n1 <= n2)
          p = upper_bound_(a, b, *(q = b+n2/2));
       else
          q = lower_bound_(b, c, *(p = a+n1/2));
       b = rotate_(p, b, q);

       ip_merge_(a, p, b);
       ip_merge_(b, q, c);
     }
}

void mergesort(int* v, int n)
{
    if (n > 1)
     {
       int h = n/2;
       mergesort(v, h); mergesort(v+h, n-h);
       ip_merge_(v, v+h, v+n);
     }
}

An example of adaptive mergesort (optimized).

Adds support code and modifications to accelerate the merge when an auxiliary buffer of any size is available (still works without additional memory). Uses forward and backward merging, ring rotation, small sequence merging and sorting, and iterative mergesort.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

static int* copy_(const int* a, const int* b, int* out)
{
    int count = b - a;
    if (a != out)
       memcpy(out, a, count*sizeof(int));
    return out + count;
}
static int* copy_backward_(const int* a, const int* b, int* out)
{
    int count = b - a;
    if (b != out)
       memmove(out - count, a, count*sizeof(int));
    return out - count;
}

static int* merge_(const int* a1, const int* b1, const int* a2,
  const int* b2, int* out)
{
    while ( a1 != b1 && a2 != b2 )
       *out++ = (*a1 <= *a2) ? *a1++ : *a2++;
    return copy_(a2, b2, copy_(a1, b1, out));
}
static int* merge_backward_(const int* a1, const int* b1,
  const int* a2, const int* b2, int* out)
{
    while ( a1 != b1 && a2 != b2 )
       *--out = (*(b1-1) > *(b2-1)) ? *--b1 : *--b2;
    return copy_backward_(a1, b1, copy_backward_(a2, b2, out));
}

static unsigned int gcd_(unsigned int m, unsigned int n)
{
    while ( n != 0 )
     {
       unsigned int t = m % n;
       m = n;
       n = t;
     }
    return m;
}
static void rotate_inner_(const int length, const int stride,
  int* first, int* last)
{
    int* p, * next = first, x = *first;
    while ( 1 )
     {
       p = next;
       if ((next += stride) >= last)
          next -= length;
       if (next == first)
          break;
       *p = *next;
     }
    *p = x;
}
static int* rotate_(int* a, int* b, int* c)
/* swap the sequence [a,b) with [b,c). */
{
    if (a != b && b != c)
     {
       int n1 = c - a;
       int n2 = b - a;

       int* i = a;
       int* j = a + gcd_(n1, n2);

       for ( ; i != j; i++ )
          rotate_inner_(n1, n2, i, c);
     }
    return a + (c - b);
}

static void ip_merge_small_(int* a, int* b, int* c)
/* inplace merge.
 * @note faster for small sequences. */
{
    while ( a != b && b != c )
       if (*a <= *b)
          a++;
       else
        {
          int* p = b+1;
          while ( p != c && *p < *a )
             p++;
          rotate_(a, b, p);
          b = p;
        }
}
static void ip_merge_(int* a, int* b, int* c, int* t, const int ts)
/* inplace merge.
 * @note works with or without additional memory. */
{
    int n1 = b - a;
    int n2 = c - b;

    if (n1 <= n2 && n1 <= ts)
     {
       merge_(t, copy_(a, b, t), b, c, a);
     }
    else if (n2 <= ts)
     {
       merge_backward_(a, b, t, copy_(b, c, t), c);
     }
    /* merge without buffer. */
    else if (n1 + n2 < 48)
     {
       ip_merge_small_(a, b, c);
     }
    else
     {
       int* p, * q;

       if (n1 <= n2)
          p = upper_bound_(a, b, *(q = b+n2/2));
       else
          q = lower_bound_(b, c, *(p = a+n1/2));
       b = rotate_(p, b, q);

       ip_merge_(a, p, b, t, ts);
       ip_merge_(b, q, c, t, ts);
     }
}
static void ip_merge_chunk_(const int cs, int* a, int* b, int* t,
  const int ts)
{
    int* p = a + cs*2;
    for ( ; p <= b; a = p, p += cs*2 )
       ip_merge_(a, a+cs, p, t, ts);
    if (a+cs < b)
       ip_merge_(a, a+cs, b, t, ts);
}

static void smallsort_(int* a, int* b)
/* insertion sort.
 * @note any stable sort with low setup cost will do. */
{
    int* p, * q;
    for ( p = a+1; p < b; p++ )
     {
       int x = *p;
       for ( q = p; a < q && x < *(q-1); q-- )
          *q = *(q-1);
       *q = x;
     }
}
static void smallsort_chunk_(const int cs, int* a, int* b)
{
    int* p = a + cs;
    for ( ; p <= b; a = p, p += cs )
       smallsort_(a, p);
    smallsort_(a, b);
}

static void mergesort_lower_(int* v, int n, int* t, const int ts)
{
    int cs = 16;
    smallsort_chunk_(cs, v, v+n);
    for ( ; cs < n; cs *= 2 )
       ip_merge_chunk_(cs, v, v+n, t, ts);
}

static void* get_buffer_(int size, int* final)
{
    void* p = NULL;
    while ( size != 0 && (p = malloc(size)) == NULL )
       size /= 2;
    *final = size;
    return p;
}
void mergesort(int* v, int n)
{
    /* @note buffer size may be in the range [0,(n+1)/2]. */
    int request = (n+1)/2 * sizeof(int);
    int actual;
    int* t = (int*) get_buffer_(request, &actual);

    /* @note allocation failure okay. */
    int tsize = actual / sizeof(int);
    mergesort_lower_(v, n, t, tsize);
    free(t);
}
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