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I have a couple of links on my page (inside a <div id="theme-selector">) which allow you to change the CSS stylesheets:

$('#theme-selector a').click(function(){
  var path = $(this).attr('href');
  $('head link').remove();
  $('head').append('<link type="text/css" href="'+path+'" rel="stylesheet" />');
  return false;
});

Now, after I've changed the style on the page, I want to get the new background color, using the following code (which I put after the $('head').append call):

var bgcolor = $('body').css('background-color');
alert(bgcolor); 

The problem is, I think, that it takes some time for the browser to download the new stylesheet and I sometimes get the old background color in my alert message. Is there some event I can bind that will only alert me after all the stylesheets are loaded on the page?

At the moment, all I can think of is using a setTimeout(function(){}, 5000); which isn't great, because what if it takes longer/shorter to load all the CSS on the page.

Let me know if I need to clarify anything and I can provide more code.

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Read this: alistapart.com/articles/alternate –  Pointy Apr 3 '10 at 12:56
    
Interesting, thanks Pointy. I need the background-color attribute for doing some JQuery magic with reloading my images, but yea, that's a nice implementation with cookies. –  Dave Apr 3 '10 at 13:52
    
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5 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Rather than creating a new link element and appending it to the head, you could retrieve the contents of the stylesheet with an AJAX call, and insert it into an inline style block. That way, you can use jQuery's 'complete' callback to fire off your check.

$('#theme-selector a').click(function(){
  var path = $(this).attr('href');
  $.get(path, function(response){
   //Check if the user theme element is in place - if not, create it.
   if (!$('#userTheme').length) $('head').append('<style id="userTheme"></style>');

   //populate the theme element with the new style (replace the old one if necessary)
   $('#userTheme').text(response);

  //Check whatever you want about the new style:
  alert($('body').css('background-color'));
  });
});

I haven't actually tested this code, so there may be some syntax-y errors, but the logic should be sound enough.

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1  
Yea, you left out a couple of brackets, but it works like a charm. Thanks! –  Dave Apr 4 '10 at 12:58
    
I updated the code snippet so it will work now! –  Beejamin Apr 6 '10 at 0:19
1  
This can stuff up your relative paths, however. –  alex Jan 24 '12 at 3:49
    
that's a very good point. If you use root-relative or absolute paths in your CSS, you'll avoid that problem. –  Beejamin Jan 24 '12 at 21:14
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The load event can be watched for any element associated with a url, does this not work for you when loading the css stylesheet? http://api.jquery.com/load-event/

Try something like this:

var path = $(this).attr('href');
$('head link').remove();
var styleSheet = $('<link type="text/css" href="'+path+'" rel="stylesheet" />');
styleSheet.load(function(){alert("Loaded");});
$('head').append(styleSheet);

Edit: As pointed out below this only works in IE, who would have thought?

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1  
Thanks, I got this working with a slight modification... $('head').append('<link id="ss1" type="text/css" href="'+path+'" rel="stylesheet" />'); $('#ss1').load(function(){alert("Loaded");}); Only problem is, this only seems to work on IE. See daniweb.com/forums/thread257850.html. I couldn't get this to work in Firefox, etc either. –  Dave Apr 4 '10 at 12:47
    
Theoretically it should have worked ;) –  Michael Apr 4 '10 at 15:05
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var cssLoaded = function()
{
    alert($('body').css('background-color'));
};
$('#theme-selector a').click(function(){
   var path = $(this).attr('href');
   $('head link').remove();
   $('head').append('<link onload="cssLoaded();" type="text/css" href="'+path+'" rel="stylesheet" />');
   return false;
});

successfully tested in Chrome 28, IE 10, FF22

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You could use lazyload (jQuery plugin) to load a css file. It has the ability to call a function when the file is included.

Example:

// Load a CSS file and pass an argument to the callback function.
LazyLoad.css('foo.css', function (arg) {
  // put your code here
});
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You could simply keep on checking if the background colour is still the same, and then do your thing if ever it changes.

oldbackground=getbackground()
function checkbackground(){
    if(oldbackground!=getbackground()){
        oldbackground=getbackground()
        //Do your thing
    }
}
setInterval(checkbackground,100)
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1  
Polling like this is never a good idea if there is an alternative. –  Kasper Peeters Aug 16 '11 at 18:54
    
@Kasper Peeters It does seem a little odd coming around 1½ years after a post and throw a downvote. Beyond that your reason for the vote is at best vague. Firing on the load event is definitely more elegant, but judging by the other answers not as easily done in cross browser compatible fashion. I won't say that my solution is necessarily better, but it gets the job done just fine, so what is the problem? –  eBusiness Aug 16 '11 at 20:10
1  
I think the real problem with this solution is that you can't be sure that the color (or anything, for that matter) will change. It might just be that any of the styles monitored might not change from one style sheet to the next, thus leading to an infinite loop. –  Oliver Nov 28 '11 at 11:09
    
@Oliver Depends on what you need it for, I can only figure one plausible use case, matching something non-CSS dependent to the background colour, for that purpose it doesn't matter that the function doesn't fire if the background doesn't change. It's meant to loop indefinitely, but it's not blocking and light on CPU, so that isn't a problem. –  eBusiness Nov 28 '11 at 20:19
    
Although it's not a great solution, it would work, so it should be considered if nothing else does. –  Jazza Aug 14 '13 at 2:29
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