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I need help with creating a C# method that returns the index of the Nth occurrence of a character in a string.

For instance, the 3rd occurrence of the character 't' in the string "dtststxtu" is 5.
(Note that the string has 4 ts.)

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What do you have to work with so far? –  Anthony Forloney Apr 3 '10 at 15:48
1  
Its not clear what you mean by getting n occurrences. Add some examples to make it clear. –  Babar Apr 3 '10 at 15:49
    
index of n occur for example 3n occur "t" in "dtststx" is 5 –  jozi Apr 3 '10 at 15:53
    
You mean only the 3rd occurance? I ask because the plural use of "occurences" suggests you want multiple values. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Apr 3 '10 at 15:56
1  
I have edited your answer to more clearly convey what you want. Hopefully you will get some answers that fit the question. Not being fluent in english is not a problem on Stack Overflow, you can always just add a line asking someone more fluent to edit your question and clean it up, but you must yourself strive to provide some examples in the question so that people understand what you need. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Apr 3 '10 at 16:04

14 Answers 14

up vote 31 down vote accepted
public int GetNthIndex(string s, char t, int n)
{
    int count = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < s.Length; i++)
    {
        if (s[i] == t)
        {
            count++;
            if (count == n)
            {
                return i;
            }
        }
    }
    return -1;
}

That could be made a lot cleaner, and there are no checks on the input.

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2  
Great approach. Nice and clean, easy to read, easy to maintain, and excellent performance. –  Mike Feb 22 at 15:57

There is a minor bug in previous solution.

Here is updated code:

s.TakeWhile(c => ((n -= (c == 't' ? 1 : 0))) > 0).Count();
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What does it return if the character is not found? –  Timuçin Sep 29 at 10:53

Joel's answer is good (and I upvoted it). Here is a LINQ-based solution:

yourString.Where(c => c == 't').Count();
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1  
@Andrew - you can shorten this by skipping the Where and passing the predicate to the Count method. Not that there is anything wrong with the way it is. –  Mike Two Apr 3 '10 at 16:04
    
@Mike - Good point! –  Andrew Hare Apr 3 '10 at 16:07

Update: Index of Nth occurance one-liner:

int NthOccurence(string s, char t, int n)
{
    s.TakeWhile(c => n - (c == t)?1:0 > 0).Count();
}

Use these at your own risk. This looks like homework, so I left a few bugs in there for your to find:

int CountChars(string s, char t)
{
   int count = 0;
   foreach (char c in s)
      if (s.Equals(t)) count ++;
   return count;
}

.

int CountChars(string s, char t)
{
     return s.Length - s.Replace(t.ToString(), "").Length;
}

.

int CountChars(string s, char t)
{
    Regex r = new Regex("[\\" + t + "]");
    return r.Match(s).Count;
}
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2  
Your one-liner example doesn't work because the value of n is never changed. –  ranomore Jun 3 '11 at 18:17
1  
Nice solution, though this isn't a true "one-liner" as a variable needs to be defined out of scope of the lambda. s.TakeWhile(c => ((n -= (c == 't')) ? 1 : 0) > 0).Count(); –  Kurt Oct 26 '11 at 20:15

Here's another LINQ solution:

string input = "dtststx";
char searchChar = 't';
int occurrencePosition = 3; // third occurrence of the char
var result = input.Select((c, i) => new { Char = c, Index = i })
                  .Where(item => item.Char == searchChar)
                  .Skip(occurrencePosition - 1)
                  .FirstOrDefault();

if (result != null)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Position {0} of '{1}' occurs at index: {2}",
                        occurrencePosition, searchChar, result.Index);
}
else
{
    Console.WriteLine("Position {0} of '{1}' not found!",
                        occurrencePosition, searchChar);
}

Just for fun, here's a Regex solution. I saw some people initially used Regex to count, but when the question changed no updates were made. Here is how it can be done with Regex - again, just for fun. The traditional approach is best for simplicity.

string input = "dtststx";
char searchChar = 't';
int occurrencePosition = 3; // third occurrence of the char

Match match = Regex.Matches(input, Regex.Escape(searchChar.ToString()))
                   .Cast<Match>()
                   .Skip(occurrencePosition - 1)
                   .FirstOrDefault();

if (match != null)
    Console.WriteLine("Index: " + match.Index);
else
    Console.WriteLine("Match not found!");
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Here is a recursive implementation - as an extension method, mimicing the format of the framework method(s):

public static int IndexOfNth(
    this string input, string value, int startIndex, int nth)
{
    if (nth < 1)
        throw new NotSupportedException("Param 'nth' must be greater than 0!");
    if (nth == 1)
        input.IndexOf(value, startIndex);
    return
        input.IndexOfNth(value, input.IndexOf(value, startIndex) + 1, --nth);
}

Also, here are some (MBUnit) unit tests that might help you (to prove it is correct):

[Test]
public void TestIndexOfNthWorksForNth1()
{
    const string input = "foo<br />bar<br />baz<br />";
    Assert.AreEqual(3, input.IndexOfNth("<br />", 0, 1));
}

[Test]
public void TestIndexOfNthWorksForNth2()
{
    const string input = "foo<br />whatthedeuce<br />kthxbai<br />";
    Assert.AreEqual(21, input.IndexOfNth("<br />", 0, 2));
}

[Test]
public void TestIndexOfNthWorksForNth3()
{
    const string input = "foo<br />whatthedeuce<br />kthxbai<br />";
    Assert.AreEqual(34, input.IndexOfNth("<br />", 0, 3));
}
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Here is a fun way to do it

     int i = 0;
     string s="asdasdasd";
     int n = 3;
     s.Where(b => (b == 'd') && (i++ == n));
     return i;
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ranomore correctly commented that Joel Coehoorn's one-liner doesn't work.

Here is a two-liner that does work, a string extension method that returns the 0-based index of the nth occurrence of a character, or -1 if no nth occurrence exists:

public static class StringExtensions
{
    public static int NthIndexOf(this string s, char c, int n)
    {
        var takeCount = s.TakeWhile(x => (n -= (x == c ? 1 : 0)) > 0).Count();
        return takeCount == s.Length ? -1 : takeCount;
    }
}
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public int GetNthOccurrenceOfChar(string s, char c, int occ)
{
    return String.Join(c.ToString(), s.Split(new char[] { c }, StringSplitOptions.None).Take(occ)).Length;
}
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Another RegEx-based solution (untested):

int NthIndexOf(string s, char t, int n) {
   if(n < 0) { throw new ArgumentException(); }
   if(n==1) { return s.IndexOf(t); }
   if(t=="") { return 0; }
   string et = RegEx.Escape(t);
   string pat = "(?<="
      + Microsoft.VisualBasic.StrDup(n-1, et + @"[.\n]*") + ")"
      + et;
   Match m = RegEx.Match(s, pat);
   return m.Success ? m.Index : -1;
}

This should be slightly more optimal than requiring RegEx to create a Matches collection, only to discard all but one match.

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In response to the Matches collection comment (since that is what I had shown in my response): I suppose a more efficient approach would be to use a while loop checking for match.Success and get the NextMatch while incrementing a counter and breaking early when the counter == index. –  Ahmad Mageed Apr 3 '10 at 18:17
    public static int FindOccuranceOf(this string str,char @char, int occurance)
    {
       var result = str.Select((x, y) => new { Letter = x, Index = y })
            .Where(letter => letter.Letter == @char).ToList();
       if (occurence > result.Count || occurance <= 0)
       {
           throw new IndexOutOfRangeException("occurance");
       }
       return result[occurance-1].Index ;
    }
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you can do this work with Regular Expressions.

        string input = "dtststx";
        char searching_char = 't';
        int output = Regex.Matches(input, "["+ searching_char +"]")[2].Index;

best regard.

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Hi all i have created two overload methods for finding nth occurrence of char and for text with less complexity without navigating through loop ,which increase performance of your application.

public static int NthIndexOf(string text, char searchChar, int nthindex)
{
   int index = -1;
   try
   {
      var takeCount = text.TakeWhile(x => (nthindex -= (x == searchChar ? 1 : 0)) > 0).Count();
      if (takeCount < text.Length) index = takeCount;
   }
   catch { }
   return index;
}
public static int NthIndexOf(string text, string searchText, int nthindex)
{
     int index = -1;
     try
     {
        Match m = Regex.Match(text, "((" + searchText + ").*?){" + nthindex + "}");
        if (m.Success) index = m.Groups[2].Captures[nthindex - 1].Index;
     }
     catch { }
     return index;
}
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Since the built-in IndexOf function is already optimized for searching a character within a string, an even faster version would be (as extension method):

public static int NthIndexOf(this string input, char value, int n)
{
    if (n <= 0) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("n", n, "n is less than zero.");

    int i = -1;
    do
    {
        i = input.IndexOf(value, i + 1);
        n--;
    }
    while (i != -1 && n > 0);

    return i;
}

Or to search from the end of the string using LastIndexOf:

public static int NthLastIndexOf(this string input, char value, int n)
{
    if (n <= 0) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("n", n, "n is less than zero.");

    int i = input.Length;
    do
    {
        i = input.LastIndexOf(value, i - 1);
        n--;
    }
    while (i != -1 && n > 0);

    return i;
}

Searching for a string instead of a character is as simple as changing the parameter type from char to string and optionally add an overload to specify the StringComparison.

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