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So I just found the most frustrating bug ever in MySQL.

Apparently the TIMESTAMP field, and supporting functions do not support any greater precision than seconds!?

So I am using PHP and Doctrine, and I really need those microseconds (I am using the actAs: [Timestampable] property).

I found a that I can use a BIGINT field to store the values. But will doctrine add the milliseconds? I think it just assigns NOW() to the field. I am also worried the date manipulation functions (in SQL) sprinkled through the code will break.

I also saw something about compiling a UDF extension. This is not an acceptable because I or a future maintainer will upgrade and poof, change gone.

Has anyone found a suitable workaround?

share|improve this question
    
Using MySQL is mandatory in your case? –  VolkerK Apr 3 '10 at 18:42
    
Not mandatory, but I'd have a hard time explaining why I am billing my client for that. I'd much rather have a workaround. –  Byron Whitlock Apr 3 '10 at 18:44
5  
5 years and they haven't fixed this bug. That is just terrible. I worked with a horrible software company that fixed bugs within 3 years. –  ChaosPandion Apr 3 '10 at 18:55
    
do you get access to a patch with the supported version of MySql? –  davek Apr 3 '10 at 18:58
6  
Because it doesn't. If you need this precision, use PostgreSQL. –  Frank Heikens Apr 3 '10 at 21:33

6 Answers 6

From the SQL92-Standard:

  • TIMESTAMP - contains the datetime field's YEAR, MONTH, DAY, HOUR, MINUTE, and SECOND.

A SQL92 compliant database does not need to support milli- or microseconds from my point of view. Therefore the Bug #8523 is correctly marked as "feature request".

How does Doctrine will handle microseconds et al? I just found the following: Doctrine#Timestamp:

The timestamp data type is a mere combination of the date and the time of the day data types. The representation of values of the time stamp type is accomplished by joining the date and time string values in a single string joined by a space. Therefore, the format template is YYYY-MM-DD HH:MI:SS.

So there are no microseconds mentioned either as in the SQL92-docs. But I am not to deep into doctrine, but it seems to be an ORM like hibernate in java for example. Therefore it could/should be possible to define your own models, where you can store the timeinformation in a BIGINT or STRING and your model is responsible to read/write it accordingly into your PHP-classes.

BTW: I don't expect MySQL to support TIMESTAMP with milli/microseconds in the near future eg the next 5 years.

share|improve this answer
5  
But every other RDBMS supports millisecond or higher precision in their timestamp fields and time functions (GETDATE() NOW() etc). +1 for being technically correct about SQL-92 –  Byron Whitlock Apr 4 '10 at 0:42
1  
Yeah but you always gotta leave 'em wanting more... –  Andrew Heath Jul 15 '10 at 8:11

For information for the next readers, this bug has finally be corrected in version 5.6.4:

"MySQL now supports fractional seconds for TIME, DATETIME, and TIMESTAMP values, with up to microsecond precision."

share|improve this answer
2  
Reference in MySQL doc: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/news-5-6-4.html –  Halcyon May 11 '12 at 11:10
    
Read up everything that is new in 5.6.4 using the link above ... but if you are looking for just how to do fractional seconds, read: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/fractional-seconds.html. Basically instead of DATETIME (or TIMESTAMP), do DATETIME(6) (or TIMESTAMP(6)) or another precision. –  Ephraim Apr 30 '13 at 6:54
up vote 9 down vote accepted

I found a workaround! It is very clean and doesn't require any application code changes. This works for Doctrine, and can be applied to other ORM's as well.

Basically, store the timestamp as a string.

Comparisons and sorting works if the date string is formatted correctly. MySQL time functions will truncate the microsecond portion when passed a date string. This is okay if microsecond precision isn't needed for date_diff etc.

SELECT DATEDIFF('2010-04-04 17:24:42.000000','2010-04-04 17:24:42.999999');
> 0

SELECT microsecond('2010-04-04 17:24:42.021343');
> 21343 

I ended up writing a MicroTimestampable class that will implement this. I just annotate my fields as actAs:MicroTimestampable and voila, microtime precision with MySQL and Doctrine.

Doctrine_Template_MicroTimestampable

class Doctrine_Template_MicroTimestampable extends Doctrine_Template_Timestampable
{
    /**
     * Array of Timestampable options
     *
     * @var string
     */
    protected $_options = array('created' =>  array('name'          =>  'created_at',
                                                    'alias'         =>  null,
                                                    'type'          =>  'string(30)',
                                                    'format'        =>  'Y-m-d H:i:s',
                                                    'disabled'      =>  false,
                                                    'expression'    =>  false,
                                                    'options'       =>  array('notnull' => true)),
                                'updated' =>  array('name'          =>  'updated_at',
                                                    'alias'         =>  null,
                                                    'type'          =>  'string(30)',
                                                    'format'        =>  'Y-m-d H:i:s',
                                                    'disabled'      =>  false,
                                                    'expression'    =>  false,
                                                    'onInsert'      =>  true,
                                                    'options'       =>  array('notnull' => true)));

    /**
     * Set table definition for Timestampable behavior
     *
     * @return void
     */
    public function setTableDefinition()
    {
        if ( ! $this->_options['created']['disabled']) {
            $name = $this->_options['created']['name'];
            if ($this->_options['created']['alias']) {
                $name .= ' as ' . $this->_options['created']['alias'];
            }
            $this->hasColumn($name, $this->_options['created']['type'], null, $this->_options['created']['options']);
        }

        if ( ! $this->_options['updated']['disabled']) {
            $name = $this->_options['updated']['name'];
            if ($this->_options['updated']['alias']) {
                $name .= ' as ' . $this->_options['updated']['alias'];
            }
            $this->hasColumn($name, $this->_options['updated']['type'], null, $this->_options['updated']['options']);
        }

        $this->addListener(new Doctrine_Template_Listener_MicroTimestampable($this->_options));
    }
}

Doctrine_Template_Listener_MicroTimestampable

class Doctrine_Template_Listener_MicroTimestampable extends Doctrine_Template_Listener_Timestampable
{
    protected $_options = array();

    /**
     * __construct
     *
     * @param string $options 
     * @return void
     */
    public function __construct(array $options)
    {
        $this->_options = $options;
    }

    /**
     * Gets the timestamp in the correct format based on the way the behavior is configured
     *
     * @param string $type 
     * @return void
     */
    public function getTimestamp($type, $conn = null)
    {
        $options = $this->_options[$type];

        if ($options['expression'] !== false && is_string($options['expression'])) {
            return new Doctrine_Expression($options['expression'], $conn);
        } else {
            if ($options['type'] == 'date') {
                return date($options['format'], time().".".microtime());
            } else if ($options['type'] == 'timestamp') {
                return date($options['format'], time().".".microtime());
            } else {
                return time().".".microtime();
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You are right about this solution to be working. However, the lookup and comparison times (for strings) will be much longer than comparing integers. –  Etamar Laron Apr 8 '10 at 19:32
    
How so if the field is indexed? –  Byron Whitlock Apr 8 '10 at 23:08
3  
An integer is simple, much less data to deal with in every case, "Hi There" is much more expensive to process than 1871239471294871290843712974129043192741890274311234 is. Integers are much more scalable, especially when being used in comparisons, more CPU cycles per comparison for anything but the shortest string. Indexing helps, but it doesn't change that you're dealing with more data on the comparisons, at least at some point. –  Nick Craver Apr 9 '10 at 10:49
3  
-1 Storing dozens of bytes rather than 4 is going to bloat your indexes, murdering insert and lookup speed for anything but toy projects. Also, all of those coercions are expensive, CPU-wise. Finally, string coercion does not provide one-to-one equivalence with native time types (for example, I can subtract one timestamp from another, but if I do this for their string representations, I always get zero. Given all of these caveats, it's simpler, safer, and faster to just call a spade a spade and store millisecond-precision timestamps in an appropriately named BIGINT column. –  user359996 Nov 8 '11 at 17:07
    
Makes me wonder if this code could be made to work with float values rather than strings.... You'd probably need to use the DateTime class when formatting the values, as some native datetime functions are not microsecond-aware (strtotime() comes to mind). –  user212218 May 7 '12 at 18:36

As you're using Doctrine to store data, and Doctrine does not support fractional seconds either, then the bottleneck is not MySQL.

I suggest you define additional fields in your objects where you need the extra precision, and store in them the output of microtime(). You probably want to store it in two different fields - one for the epoch seconds timestamp and the other for the microseconds part. That way you can store standard 32bit integers and easily sort and filter on them using SQL.

I often recommend storing epoch seconds instead of native timestamp types as they are usually easier to manipulate and avoid the whole time zone issue you keep getting into with native time types and providing service internationally.

share|improve this answer
    
This seems like a kludge, but it may be the only way to workaround. Thanks for the info. –  Byron Whitlock Apr 4 '10 at 18:21

Another workaround for Time in milliseconds. Created function "time_in_msec"

USAGE :

Difference between two dates in milliseconds.

mysql> SELECT time_in_msec('2010-07-12 23:14:36.233','2010-07-11 23:04:00.000') AS miliseconds;
+-------------+
| miliseconds |
+-------------+
| 87036233    |
+-------------+
1 row in set, 2 warnings (0.00 sec)



DELIMITER $$

DROP FUNCTION IF EXISTS `time_in_msec`$$

CREATE FUNCTION `time_in_msec`(ftime VARCHAR(23),stime VARCHAR(23)) RETURNS VARCHAR(30) CHARSET latin1
BEGIN
    DECLARE msec INT DEFAULT 0;
    DECLARE sftime,sstime VARCHAR(27);
    SET ftime=CONCAT(ftime,'000');
    SET stime=CONCAT(stime,'000');
    SET  msec=TIME_TO_SEC(TIMEDIFF(ftime,stime))*1000+TRUNCATE(MICROSECOND(TIMEDIFF(ftime,stime))/1000,0);
    RETURN msec;
END$$

DELIMITER ;
share|improve this answer

From Mysql version 5.6.4 onward ,It stores microsecond in a column.

"MySQL now supports fractional seconds for TIME, DATETIME, and TIMESTAMP values, with up to microsecond precision."

For example:

CREATE TABLE `test_table` (
`name` VARCHAR(1000) ,
`orderdate` DATETIME(6)
);

INSERT INTO test_table VALUES('A','2010-12-10 14:12:09.019473');

SELECT * FROM test_table;

Only needs to change datatype to datetime to datetime(6);

For more information refer following: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/fractional-seconds.html

share|improve this answer
    
And are you saying you don't need any changes to Doctrine? –  malcolmhall Jul 6 '13 at 20:01
    
Downside is that you can not use ALTER TABLE table CHANGE COLUMN timestamp_column TIMESTAMP(6) NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP You will have to change it to be CURRENT_TIMESTAMP(6) –  fyrye Jan 19 at 5:04

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