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First, the desired result

I have User and Item models. I'd like to build a JSON response that looks like this:

{
  "user":
    {"username":"Bob!","foo":"whatever","bar":"hello!"},

  "items": [
    {"id":1, "name":"one", "zim":"planet", "gir":"earth"},
    {"id":2, "name":"two", "zim":"planet", "gir":"mars"}
  ]
}

However, my User and Item model have more attributes than just those. I found a way to get this to work, but beware, it's not pretty... Please help...

Update

The next section contains the original question. The last section shows the new solution.


My hacks

home_controller.rb

class HomeController < ApplicationController

  def observe
    respond_to do |format|
      format.js { render :json => Observation.new(current_user, @items).to_json }
    end
  end

end

observation.rb

# NOTE: this is not a subclass of ActiveRecord::Base
# this class just serves as a container to aggregate all "observable" objects
class Observation
  attr_accessor :user, :items

  def initialize(user, items)
    self.user = user
    self.items = items
  end

  # The JSON needs to be decoded before it's sent to the `to_json` method in the home_controller otherwise the JSON will be escaped...
  # What a mess!
  def to_json
    {
      :user => ActiveSupport::JSON.decode(user.to_json(:only => :username, :methods => [:foo, :bar])),
      :items => ActiveSupport::JSON.decode(auctions.to_json(:only => [:id, :name], :methods => [:zim, :gir]))
    }
  end
end

Look Ma! No more hacks!

Override as_json instead

The ActiveRecord::Serialization#as_json docs are pretty sparse. Here's the brief:

as_json(options = nil) 
  [show source]

For more information on to_json vs as_json, see the accepted answer for Overriding to_json in Rails 2.3.5

The code sans hacks

user.rb

class User < ActiveRecord::Base

  def as_json(options)
    options = { :only => [:username], :methods => [:foo, :bar] }.merge(options)
    super(options)
  end

end

item.rb

class Item < ActiveRecord::Base

  def as_json(options)
    options = { :only => [:id, name], :methods => [:zim, :gir] }.merge(options)
    super(options)
  end

end

home_controller.rb

class HomeController < ApplicationController

  def observe
    @items = Items.find(...)
    respond_to do |format|
      format.js do
        render :json => {
          :user => current_user || {},
          :items => @items
        }
      end
    end
  end

end
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

EDITED to use as_json instead of to_json. See http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2572284/override-to-json-in-rails-2-3-5/2574900 for a detailed explanation. I think this is the best answer.

You can render the JSON you want in the controller without the need for the helper model.

def observe
  respond_to do |format|
    format.js do
      render :json => {
        :user => current_user.as_json(:only => [:username], :methods => [:foo, :bar]),
        :items => @items.collect{ |i| i.as_json(:only => [:id, :name], :methods => [:zim, :gir]) }
      }
    end
  end
end

Make sure ActiveRecord::Base.include_root_in_json is set to false or else you'll get a 'user' attribute inside of 'user'. Unfortunately, it looks like Arrays do not pass options down to each element, so the collect is necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
The hash syntax you're using is only from 1.9 and may confuse anyone who's not familiar with it. May I suggest changing it to be the standard "user" => current that we all "know and love"? –  Ryan Bigg Apr 3 '10 at 19:23
    
@Jonathan Julian, ActiveRecord::Base.include_root_in_json is set to false and this is doing exactly what I expected, but not exactly what I hoped for. The internal to_json calls are getting escaped by render :json. For example, instead of {"user": {"username": "Bob!"}} I am getting {"user": "{\"username\": \"Bob!\"}"} :( –  maček Apr 3 '10 at 19:29
    
@ryan fixed hash syntax to be ruby 1.8 style –  Jonathan Julian Apr 3 '10 at 19:30
    
@Ryan Bigg, it's actually a typo. (And a syntax error, ever for Ruby 1.9). He means {:user => current_user...} –  maček Apr 3 '10 at 19:32
    
@smotchkkisss You can always render :json => {} and just build up that hash by hand without calling to_json on the models. Or use decode as you've already found. Either way, there's no need for a separate model. –  Jonathan Julian Apr 3 '10 at 19:38

There are a lot of new Gems for building JSON now, for this case the most suitable I have found is Jsonify:

https://github.com/bsiggelkow/jsonify https://github.com/bsiggelkow/jsonify-rails

This allows you to build up the mix of attributes and arrays from your models.

share|improve this answer

Working answer #2 To avoid the issue of your json being "escaped", build up the data structure by hand, then call to_json on it once. It can get a little wordy, but you can do it all in the controller, or abstract it out to the individual models as to_hash or something.

def observe
  respond_to do |format|
    format.js do
      render :json => {
        :user => {:username => current_user.username, :foo => current_user.foo, :bar => current_user.bar},
        :items => @items.collect{ |i| {:id => i.id, :name => i.name, :zim => i.zim, :gir => i.gir} }
      }
    end
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
See why I had my "Override to_json in Rails 2.3.5" (stackoverflow.com/questions/2572284/…) question before? ;) –  maček Apr 3 '10 at 20:10
    
To solve both your problems, create a to_hash in each of your models and build them yourself. Trade off a bit of code for a couple headaches. –  Jonathan Julian Apr 3 '10 at 20:18
    
I'll give this a shot. –  maček Apr 3 '10 at 20:21
    
please update @items.each to read @items.collect. Array#each returns the original @items array. This is only mildly cleaner than what I had before, but it still seems like I should be able to tap into the as_json or to_json methods somehow; I mean, that's what they're for. It's very possible that many more objects will be appearing in the "Observation" hash, so doing all this extra work for each one seems like it could be a headache of its own. If a more suitable answer doesn't appear in a couple days, I'll mark this as accepted. Thanks again :) –  maček Apr 3 '10 at 20:35

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