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I want to use /dev/random or /dev/urandom in C. How can I do it? I don't know how can I handle them in C, if someone knows please tell me how. Thank you.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 66 down vote accepted

EDIT If arc4random is available on your system, you may want to use arc4random_buf instead. Its numbers are cryptographically-secure, the generator is stupidly fast, and the call cannot fail. This is by far the best way to generate pseudorandom numbers on platforms that support it (BSD systems including OS X/iOS, Android, programs that link against LibreSSL, but as of very early 2015, notably not Linux).

char myRandomData[50];
arc4random_buf(myRandomData, sizeof myRandomData);

If arc4random and its derivatives are not available on your system, you can use the random devices as if they were files. You read from them and you get random data. I'm using open/read here, but fopen/fread would work just as well.

int randomData = open("/dev/random", O_RDONLY);
char myRandomData[50];
size_t randomDataLen = 0;
while (randomDataLen < sizeof myRandomData)
{
    ssize_t result = read(myRandomData, myRandomData + randomDataLen, (sizeof myRandomData) - randomDataLen);
    if (result < 0)
    {
        // error, unable to read /dev/random 
    }
    randomDataLen += result;
}
close(randomData);

You may read many more random bytes before closing the file descriptor, although /dev/random will eventually deplete. Once it does, it will abort the reading operation and read will return how many bytes were successfully read. /dev/urandom will never block or deplete. (/dev/urandom will also always give you the number of bytes you asked for, so you wouldn't need the loop around the read.)

The difference between /dev/random and /dev/urandom is that /dev/random uses environmental noise gathered from device drivers to create random numbers. /dev/urandom returns random numbers based on /dev/random, but it also has a RNG algorithm behind it to cover up for when no entropy bits are available from /dev/random. It is still considered cryptographically-secure, and so in general it's a better idea to use it than /dev/random.

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okay, nice answer. And what if I want to set it to read multiple numbers ? Would i do while(something) { read(..) } or should i open/close it everytime the loop starts over ? –  stojance Apr 3 '10 at 19:34
3  
Or just read more to fill an array of integers. –  mark4o Apr 3 '10 at 19:43
6  
@karim: Please never read all the bytes from /dev/random. Just don't. Your program is probably not the only user on the system that needs random bytes. –  Zan Lynx Feb 25 '11 at 22:40
1  
@morrog Overeager reviewers rejected it, so I did the changes manually. Sorry you don't get credited for it. –  zneak Oct 26 '13 at 22:01
1  
@zneak Emphasis on long-lived since for those it doesn't hurt to be extra paranoid. For normal crypto use /dev/urandom is fine. –  CodesInChaos Oct 26 '13 at 22:51

Just open the file for reading and then read data. In C++0x C++11 you may wish to use std::random_device which provides cross-platform access to such devices.

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It appears that std::random_device didn't make it into the 2011 standard. It does appear in the N3797 draft. –  Keith Thompson Jan 2 at 19:31

There are other accurate answers above. I needed to use a FILE* stream, though. Here's what I did...

int byte_count = 64;
char data[64];
FILE *fp;
fp = fopen("/dev/urandom", "r");
fread(&data, 1, byte_count, fp);
fclose(fp);
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1  
An int can be read directly by simply casting the int pointer to a char pointer. fread((char*)(&myInt),sizeof(myInt),1,fp) –  Azeem Bande-Ali May 25 '13 at 18:50
    
@AzeemBande-Ali:Why don't you use fread((int*)(&myInt),sizeof(myInt),1,fp) instead ? I mean a cast to int* ? –  Larry May 30 '14 at 15:20
1  
In neither case should a cast be used in C code, fread() takes a void *, so just do fread(&myInt, ... ); –  nos Jan 2 at 21:12

Zneak is 100% correct. Its also very common to read a buffer of random numbers that is slightly larger than what you'll need on startup. You can then populate an array in memory, or write them to your own file for later re-use.

A typical implementation of the above:

typedef struct prandom {
     struct prandom *prev;
     int64_t number;
     struct prandom *next;
} prandom_t;

This becomes more or less like a tape that just advances which can be magically replenished by another thread as needed. There are a lot of services that provide large file dumps of nothing but random numbers that are generated with much stronger generators such as:

  • Radioactive decay
  • Optical behavior (photons hitting a semi transparent mirror)
  • Atmospheric noise (not as strong as the above)
  • Farms of intoxicated monkeys typing on keyboards and moving mice (kidding)

Not being concerned with quality, if you need a lot of numbers for something like a monte carlo simulation, it's much better to have them available in a way that will not cause read() to block.

However, remember, the randomness of a number is as deterministic as the complexity involved in generating it. /dev/random and /dev/urandom are convenient, but not as strong as using a HRNG (or downloading a large dump from a HRNG). Also worth noting that /dev/random refills via entropy, so it can block for quite a while depending on circumstances.

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Downloading "large file dumps of nothing but random numbers" is terrible advice for cryptograhic purposes. It's asking someone else to provide the seed to your functions, and those services seem to transfer that data unencrypted over the internet. Please don't do that. –  dequis Jul 9 '14 at 14:07

zneak's answer covers it simply, however the reality is more complicated than that. For example, you need to consider whether /dev/{u}random really is the random number device in the first place. Such a scenario may occur if your machine has been compromised and the devices replaced with symlinks to /dev/zero or a sparse file. If this happens, the random stream is now completely predictable.

The simplest way (at least on Linux and FreeBSD) is to perform an ioctl call on the device that will only succeed if the device is a random generator:

int data;
int result = ioctl(fd, RNDGETENTCNT, &data); 
// Upon success data now contains amount of entropy available in bits

If this is performed before the first read of the random device, then there's a fair bet that you've got the random device. So @zneak's answer can better be extended to be:

int randomData = open("/dev/random", O_RDONLY);
int entropy;
int result = ioctl(randomData, RNDGETENTCNT, &entropy);

if (!result) {
   // Error - /dev/random isn't actually a random device
   return;
}

if (entropy < sizeof(int) * 8) {
    // Error - there's not enough bits of entropy in the random device to fill the buffer
    return;
}

int myRandomInteger;
size_t randomDataLen = 0;
while (randomDataLen < sizeof myRandomInteger)
{
    ssize_t result = read(randomData, ((char*)&myRandomInteger) + randomDataLen, (sizeof myRandomInteger) - randomDataLen);
    if (result < 0)
    {
        // error, unable to read /dev/random 
    }
    randomDataLen += result;
}
close(randomData);

The Insane Coding blog covered this, and other pitfalls not so long ago; I strongly recommend reading the entire article. I have to give credit to their where this solution was pulled from.

Edited to add (2014-07-25)...
Co-incidentally, I read last night that as part of the LibReSSL effort, Linux appears to be getting a GetRandom() syscall. As at time of writing, there's no word of when it will be available in a kernel general release. However this would be the preferred interface to get cryptographically secure random data as it removes all pitfalls that access via files provides. See also the LibReSSL possible implementation.

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An attacker with enough power to replace /dev/random or /dev/urandom with something else typically also has enough power to load a kernel module to screw up every attempt that you make at determining if it's a random device or not. –  zneak Jan 2 at 20:39

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