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I've had a look around for the answer to this, but I only seem to be able to find software that does it for you. Does anybody know how to go about doing this in python?

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5  
A torrent file stores the the SHA1 of each pieces of the shared files and a SHA1 of the torrent metadata (the metainfo hash). Which hash do you want exactly? –  Alexandre Jasmin Apr 3 '10 at 20:13
    
It would be the hash for each of the pieces. Does the file not also contain a hash for the completed file to check for errors? –  Leda Apr 3 '10 at 20:31
2  
Some .torrent files include an md5 hash of each file but that's an optional extension to the file format. The pieces hash can be used to check the validity of the files of course. You just check if all pieces are there and if they all have the right hash. –  Alexandre Jasmin Apr 3 '10 at 20:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I wrote a piece of python code that verifies the hashes of downloaded files against what's in a .torrent file. Assuming you want to check a download for corruption you may find this useful.

You need the bencode package to use this. Bencode is the serialization format used in .torrent files. It can marshal lists, dictionaries, strings and numbers somewhat like JSON.

The code takes the hashes contained in the info['pieces'] string:

torrent_file = open(sys.argv[1], "rb")
metainfo = bencode.bdecode(torrent_file.read())
info = metainfo['info']
pieces = StringIO.StringIO(info['pieces'])

That string contains a succession of 20 byte hashes (one for each piece). These hashes are then compared with the hash of the pieces of on-disk file(s).

The only complicated part of this code is handling multi-file torrents because a single torrent piece can span more than one file (internally BitTorrent treats multi-file downloads as a single contiguous file). I'm using the generator function pieces_generator() to abstract that away.

You may want to read the BitTorrent spec to understand this in more details.

Full code bellow:

import sys, os, hashlib, StringIO, bencode

def pieces_generator(info):
    """Yield pieces from download file(s)."""
    piece_length = info['piece length']
    if 'files' in info: # yield pieces from a multi-file torrent
        piece = ""
        for file_info in info['files']:
            path = os.sep.join([info['name']] + file_info['path'])
            print path
            sfile = open(path.decode('UTF-8'), "rb")
            while True:
                piece += sfile.read(piece_length-len(piece))
                if len(piece) != piece_length:
                    sfile.close()
                    break
                yield piece
                piece = ""
        if piece != "":
            yield piece
    else: # yield pieces from a single file torrent
        path = info['name']
        print path
        sfile = open(path.decode('UTF-8'), "rb")
        while True:
            piece = sfile.read(piece_length)
            if not piece:
                sfile.close()
                return
            yield piece

def corruption_failure():
    """Display error message and exit"""
    print("download corrupted")
    exit(1)

def main():
    # Open torrent file
    torrent_file = open(sys.argv[1], "rb")
    metainfo = bencode.bdecode(torrent_file.read())
    info = metainfo['info']
    pieces = StringIO.StringIO(info['pieces'])
    # Iterate through pieces
    for piece in pieces_generator(info):
        # Compare piece hash with expected hash
        piece_hash = hashlib.sha1(piece).digest()
        if (piece_hash != pieces.read(20)):
            corruption_failure()
    # ensure we've read all pieces 
    if pieces.read():
        corruption_failure()

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()
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Don't know if this solved the OP's problem, but it definitely solved mine (once I got past the bencode package's brokenness: stackoverflow.com/questions/2693963/…). Thanks! –  Nicholas Knight Apr 25 '10 at 16:27
    
I always wanted to have such a tool, and was about to dig into the old official python client to find out how to write one. Thanks!! –  netvope May 28 '10 at 1:08

Here how I've extracted HASH value from torrent file:

#!/usr/bin/python

import sys, os, hashlib, StringIO
import bencode



def main():
    # Open torrent file
    torrent_file = open(sys.argv[1], "rb")
    metainfo = bencode.bdecode(torrent_file.read())
    info = metainfo['info']
    print hashlib.sha1(bencode.bencode(info)).hexdigest()    

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

It is the same as running command:

transmissioncli -i test.torrent 2>/dev/null | grep "^hash:" | awk '{print $2}'

Hope, it helps :)

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1  
What that gives you is the info hash of the torrent. –  Alexandre Jasmin Nov 15 '10 at 22:26
    
+1 since that's exactly what I wanted to do when I visited a question about "extracting the SHA1 hash from a torrent file". –  sjy Jun 19 at 9:24

According to this, you should be able to find the md5sums of files by searching for the part of the data that looks like:

d[...]6:md5sum32:[hash is here][...]e

(SHA is not part of the spec)

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1  
Just search for SHA on the page you linked you'll see it's used extensively. Also quote: md5sum: (optional) a 32-character hex[...] This is not used by BitTorrent at all, but it is included by some programs –  Alexandre Jasmin Apr 4 '10 at 7:17
    
Ah I see, so something like d[...]9:info_hash[length]:[SHA hash]e –  Brendan Long Apr 4 '10 at 8:26
    
I'm afraid not. As I mentioned in the question comments there's no SHA1 hash for the files themselves but for each little file pieces. Pieces hash are useful because they can be verified early in the download process. As soon as you have one valid piece you can share it with other peers... That said your md5 solution has the advantage of being simple. It's just not guaranteed to be available in all .torrent files. –  Alexandre Jasmin Apr 4 '10 at 8:36

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