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Is it possible to write a C++ template that changes behavior depending on if a certain member function is defined on a class?

Here's a simple example of what I would want to write:

template<class T>
std::string optionalToString(T* obj)
{
    if (FUNCTION_EXISTS(T->toString))
        return obj->toString();
    else
        return "toString not defined";
}

So, if class T has toString() defined, then it uses it; otherwise, it doesn't. The magical part that I don't know how to do is the "FUNCTION_EXISTS" part.

share|improve this question
3  
Of course it goes without saying that the template answer(s) below only work with compile-time information, i.e. T must have toString. If you pass in a subclass of T that does define toString, but T does not, you will be told toString is not defined. –  chrispy Sep 2 '10 at 9:50

19 Answers 19

up vote 151 down vote accepted

Yes, with SFINAE you can check if a given class does provide a certain method. Here's the working code:

#include <iostream>

struct Hello
{
    int helloworld()
    { return 0; }
};

struct Generic {};


// SFINAE test
template <typename T>
class has_helloworld
{
    typedef char one;
    typedef long two;

    template <typename C> static one test( typeof(&C::helloworld) ) ;
    template <typename C> static two test(...);


public:
    enum { value = sizeof(test<T>(0)) == sizeof(char) };
};


int
main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    std::cout << has_helloworld<Hello>::value << std::endl;
    std::cout << has_helloworld<Generic>::value << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

I've just tested it with Linux and gcc 4.1/4.3. I don't know if it's portable to other platforms running different compilers.

share|improve this answer
7  
Although, I used the following for 'one' and 'two': typedef char Small; class Big{char dummy[2];} to ensure no ambiguity about platform dependent variable size. –  user23167 Nov 2 '08 at 21:40
2  
I doubt it exists on earth a platform with the sizeof(char) == sizeof(long) –  Nicola Bonelli Nov 2 '08 at 21:46
5  
I'm not entirely sure, but I don't think this is portable. typeof is a GCC extension, this will not work on other compilers. –  Leon Timmermans Nov 2 '08 at 21:52
37  
typeof isn't needed - char[sizeof(&C::helloworld)] works as well. And to avoid sizeof(long)==sizeof(char), use a struct { char[2] };. It must have a size >=2 –  MSalters Feb 2 '09 at 9:03
20  
Trivial, but took me a while to figure out: replace typeof by decltype when using C++0x, e.g., via -std=c++0x. –  hrr Jun 10 '11 at 16:46

C++ allows SFINAE to be used for this (notice that with C++11 features this is simplier because it supports extended SFINAE on nearly arbitrary expressions - the below was crafted to work with common C++03 compilers):

#define HAS_MEM_FUNC(func, name)                                        \
    template<typename T, typename Sign>                                 \
    struct name {                                                       \
        typedef char yes[1];                                            \
        typedef char no [2];                                            \
        template <typename U, U> struct type_check;                     \
        template <typename _1> static yes &chk(type_check<Sign, &_1::func > *); \
        template <typename   > static no  &chk(...);                    \
        static bool const value = sizeof(chk<T>(0)) == sizeof(yes);     \
    }

the above template and macro tries to instantiate a template, giving it a member function pointer type, and the actual member function pointer. If the types to not fit, SFINAE causes the template to be ignored. Usage like this:

HAS_MEM_FUNC(toString, has_to_string);

template<typename T> void
doSomething() {
   if(has_to_string<T, std::string(T::*)()>::value) {
      ...
   } else {
      ...
   }
}

But note that you cannot just call that toString function in that if branch. since the compiler will check for validity in both branches, that would fail for cases the function doesnt exist. One way is to use SFINAE once again (enable_if can be gotten from boost too):

template<bool C, typename T = void>
struct enable_if {
  typedef T type;
};

template<typename T>
struct enable_if<false, T> { };

HAS_MEM_FUNC(toString, has_to_string);

template<typename T> 
typename enable_if<has_to_string<T, 
                   std::string(T::*)()>::value, std::string>::type
doSomething(T * t) {
   /* something when T has toString ... */
   return t->toString();
}

template<typename T> 
typename enable_if<!has_to_string<T, 
                   std::string(T::*)()>::value, std::string>::type
doSomething(T * t) {
   /* something when T doesnt have toString ... */
   return "T::toString() does not exist.";
}

Have fun using it. The advantage of it is that it also works for overloaded member functions, and also for const member functions (remember using std::string(T::*)() const as the member function pointer type then!).

share|improve this answer
1  
I like how type_check is used to ensure that the signatures agree exactly. Is there a way to make it so that it will match any method which could be called in the manner that a method with signature Sign could be called? (E.g. if Sign = std::string(T::*)(), allow std::string T::toString(int default = 42, ...) to match.) –  j_random_hacker Nov 17 '10 at 1:37
3  
I just figures something out about this that wasn't immediate obvious to me, so in case it helps others: chk isn't and needn't be defined! The sizeof operator determines the size of the output of chk without chk ever needing to be called. –  SCFrench Jan 23 '11 at 17:24
1  
@deek0146: Yes, T must not be a primitive type, because the pointer-to-method-of-T declaration is not subject to SFINAE and will error out for any non-class T. IMO the easiest solution is to combine with is_class check from boost. –  Jan Hudec May 22 '12 at 12:04
1  
Is this (or anything equivalent) in Boost? –  Dan Nissenbaum Mar 29 '13 at 6:24
1  
@Viet: Because you can't return an array in C or C++. (An alternative to using a reference is to return a structure containing an array, you see this in other answers) –  Ben Voigt Jun 9 '13 at 1:32

This question is old, but with C++11 we got a new way to check for a functions existence (or existence of any non-type member, really), relying on SFINAE again:

template<class T>
auto serialize_imp(std::ostream& os, T const& obj, int)
    -> decltype(os << obj, void())
{
  os << obj;
}

template<class T>
auto serialize_imp(std::ostream& os, T const& obj, long)
    -> decltype(obj.stream(os), void())
{
  obj.stream(os);
}

template<class T>
auto serialize(std::ostream& os, T const& obj)
    -> decltype(serialize_imp(os, obj, 0), void())
{
  serialize_imp(os, obj, 0);
}

Live example.

Now onto some explanations. First thing, I use expression SFINAE to exclude the serialize(_imp) functions from overload resolution, if the first expression inside decltype isn't valid (aka, the function doesn't exist).

The void() is used to make the return type of all those functions void.

The 0 argument is used to prefer the os << obj overload if both are available (literal 0 is of type int and as such the first overload is a better match).


Now, you probably want a trait to check if a function exists. Luckily, it's easy to write that. Note, though, that you need to write a trait yourself for every different function name you might want.

#include <type_traits>

template<class>
struct sfinae_true : std::true_type{};

namespace detail{
  template<class T, class A0>
  static auto test_stream(int)
      -> sfinae_true<decltype(std::declval<T>().stream(std::declval<A0>()))>;
  template<class, class A0>
  static auto test_stream(long) -> std::false_type;
} // detail::

template<class T, class Arg>
struct has_stream : decltype(detail::test_stream<T, Arg>(0)){};

Live example.

And on to explanations. First, sfinae_true is a helper type, and it basically amounts to the same as writing decltype(void(std::declval<T>().stream(a0)), std::true_type{}). The advantage is simply that it's shorter.
Next, the struct has_stream : decltype(...) inherits from either std::true_type or std::false_type in the end, depending on whether the decltype check in test_stream fails or not.
Last, std::declval gives you a "value" of whatever type you pass, without you needing to know how you can construct it. Note that this is only possible inside an unevaluated context, such as decltype, sizeof and others.


Note that decltype is not necessarily needed, as sizeof (and all unevaluated contexts) got that enhancement. It's just that decltype already delivers a type and as such is just cleaner. Here's a sizeof version of one of the overloads:

template<class T>
void serialize_imp(std::ostream& os, T const& obj, int,
    int(*)[sizeof((os << obj),0)] = 0)
{
  os << obj;
}

Live example.

The int and long parameters are still there for the same reason. The array pointer is used to provide a context where sizeof can be used.

share|improve this answer
    
Your second 'Live example' does not compile :-/ Can you check why? –  kyku Mar 22 '13 at 20:18
    
@kyku: Seems somebody could simply edit the snippet and the link would jump to that new revision. Wtf. Changed link to only point to revision 0, and changed the snippet to reflect the actual code in the answer. Thanks for telling me. –  Xeo Mar 22 '13 at 20:27
    
The advantage of decltype over sizeof is also that a temporary is not introduced by specially crafted rules for function calls (so you don't have to have access rights to the destructor of the return type and won't cause an implicit instantiation if the return type is a class template instantiation). –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 11 at 17:29

Though this question is two years old, I'll dare to add my answer. Hopefully it will clarify the previous, indisputably excellent, solution. I took the very helpful answers of Nicola Bonelli and Johannes Schaub and merged them into a solution that is, IMHO, more readable, clear and does not require the typeof extension:

template <class Type>
class TypeHasToString
{
    // This type won't compile if the second template parameter isn't of type T,
    // so I can put a function pointer type in the first parameter and the function
    // itself in the second thus checking that the function has a specific signature.
    template <typename T, T> struct TypeCheck;

    typedef char Yes;
    typedef long No;

    // A helper struct to hold the declaration of the function pointer.
    // Change it if the function signature changes.
    template <typename T> struct ToString
    {
        typedef void (T::*fptr)();
    };

    template <typename T> static Yes HasToString(TypeCheck< typename ToString<T>::fptr, &T::toString >*);
    template <typename T> static No  HasToString(...);

public:
    static bool const value = (sizeof(HasToString<Type>(0)) == sizeof(Yes));
};

I checked it with gcc 4.1.2. The credit goes mainly to Nicola Bonelli and Johannes Schaub, so give them a vote up if my answer helps you :)

share|improve this answer
    
Just wondering, does this do anything that Konrad Rudolph's solution below does not do? –  Alastair Irvine Dec 12 '13 at 14:52
2  
@AlastairIrvine, this solution hides all the logic inside, Konrad's puts some of the burden on the user. Although short and much more readable, Konrad's solution requires a separate template specialization for each class that has toString. If you write a generic library, that wishes to work with any class out there (think of something like boost), then requiring the user to define additional specializations of some obscure templates might be unacceptable. Sometimes it's preferable to write a very complicated code to keep the public interface as simple as it can be. –  FireAphis Dec 14 '13 at 23:37

This is what type traits are there for. Unfortunately, they have to defined manually. In your case, imagine the following:

template <typename T>
struct response_trait {
    static bool const has_tostring = false;
};

template <>
struct response_trait<your_type_with_tostring> {
    static bool const has_tostring = true;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
+1: traits have always been a clean way to solve problems. –  Nicola Bonelli Nov 3 '08 at 23:09
4  
you should prefer enum for traits instead of static constants : " Static constant members are lvalues,which forces the compiler to instantiate and allocate the definition for the static member. As a result, the computation is no longer limited to a pure "compile-time" effect." –  Comptrol Mar 20 '09 at 9:28
3  
"Enumeration values aren't lvalues(that is,they don't have an address).So, when you pass them "by reference," no static memory is used. It's almost exactly as if you passed the computed value as a literal. These considerations motivate us to use enumeration values" C++ Templates:The Complete Guide –  Comptrol Mar 20 '09 at 9:29
17  
Comptrol: no, the cited passage doesn't apply here since integer type static constants are a special case! They behave exactly like an enum here and are the preferred way. The old enum hack was only necessary on compilers that didn't follow the C++ standard. –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 23 '09 at 9:07
1  
@Roger Pate: Not quite. “used in the program” here is apparently synonymous with “referenced”. The prevailing reading of this passage, and the one implemented by all modern C++ compilers, is that you can take the value of a static constant without needing to declare it (the previous sentence says this: “… the member can appear in integral constant expressions …”). You only need to define it if you take its address (explicitly via &T::x or implicitly by binding it to a reference). –  Konrad Rudolph May 10 '10 at 10:44

Now this was a nice little puzzle - great question!

Here's an alternative to Nicola Bonelli's solution that does not rely on the non-standard typeof operator.

Unfortunately, it does not work on GCC (MinGW) 3.4.5 or Digital Mars 8.42n, but it does work on all versions of MSVC (including VC6) and on Comeau C++.

The longer comment block has the details on how it works (or is supposed to work). As it says, I'm not sure which behavior is standards compliant - I'd welcome commentary on that.


update - 7 Nov 2008:

It looks like while this code is syntactically correct, the behavior that MSVC and Comeau C++ show does not follow the standard (thanks to Leon Timmermans and litb for pointing me in the right direction). The C++03 standard says the following:

14.6.2 Dependent names [temp.dep]

Paragraph 3

In the definition of a class template or a member of a class template, if a base class of the class template depends on a template-parameter, the base class scope is not examined during unqualified name lookup either at the point of definition of the class template or member or during an instantiation of the class template or member.

So, it looks like that when MSVC or Comeau consider the toString() member function of T performing name lookup at the call site in doToString() when the template is instantiated, that is incorrect (even though it's actually the behavior I was looking for in this case).

The behavior of GCC and Digital Mars looks to be correct - in both cases the non-member toString() function is bound to the call.

Rats - I thought I might have found a clever solution, instead I uncovered a couple compiler bugs...


#include <iostream>
#include <string>

struct Hello
{
    std::string toString() {
        return "Hello";
    }
};

struct Generic {};


// the following namespace keeps the toString() method out of
//  most everything - except the other stuff in this
//  compilation unit

namespace {
    std::string toString()
    {
        return "toString not defined";
    }

    template <typename T>
    class optionalToStringImpl : public T
    {
    public:
        std::string doToString() {

            // in theory, the name lookup for this call to 
            //  toString() should find the toString() in 
            //  the base class T if one exists, but if one 
            //  doesn't exist in the base class, it'll 
            //  find the free toString() function in 
            //  the private namespace.
            //
            // This theory works for MSVC (all versions
            //  from VC6 to VC9) and Comeau C++, but
            //  does not work with MinGW 3.4.5 or 
            //  Digital Mars 8.42n
            //
            // I'm honestly not sure what the standard says 
            //  is the correct behavior here - it's sort 
            //  of like ADL (Argument Dependent Lookup - 
            //  also known as Koenig Lookup) but without
            //  arguments (except the implied "this" pointer)

            return toString();
        }
    };
}

template <typename T>
std::string optionalToString(T & obj)
{
    // ugly, hacky cast...
    optionalToStringImpl<T>* temp = reinterpret_cast<optionalToStringImpl<T>*>( &obj);

    return temp->doToString();
}



int
main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    Hello helloObj;
    Generic genericObj;

    std::cout << optionalToString( helloObj) << std::endl;
    std::cout << optionalToString( genericObj) << std::endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
No, it's not standards compliant, though I think it will work in GCC if you turn on the -fpermissive option. –  Leon Timmermans Nov 4 '08 at 22:50
    
I know the comments don't give a lot of room, but could you point to information on why it's not standards compliant? (I'm not arguing - I'm curious) –  Michael Burr Nov 5 '08 at 5:30
    
Mike B: the standard says in 3.10 p15: "If a program attempts to access the stored value of an object through an lvalue of other than one of the following types the behavior is undefined" and that list indeed doesn't include the case you do. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 7 '08 at 8:17
4  
i'm not sure why it doesnt add another comment of me: your toString call is unqualified. so it will always call the free function and never the one in the base, since the baseclass is dependant on a template type parameter. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 7 '08 at 8:27
    
@litb: Thanks for the pointers. I don't think 3.10 applies here. The call to toString() inside of doToString() is not "accessing the stored value of an object through an lvalue". But your 2nd comment is correct. I'll update the answer. –  Michael Burr Nov 7 '08 at 18:49

The standard C++ solution presented here by litb will not work as expected if the method happens to be defined in a base class.

For a solution that handles this situation refer to :

In Russian : http://www.rsdn.ru/forum/message/2759773.1.aspx

English Translation by Roman.Perepelitsa : http://groups.google.com/group/comp.lang.c++.moderated/tree/browse_frm/thread/4f7c7a96f9afbe44/c95a7b4c645e449f?pli=1

It is insanely clever. However one issue with this solutiion is that gives compiler errors if the type being tested is one that cannot be used as a base class (e.g. primitive types)

In Visual Studio, I noticed that if working with method having no arguments, an extra pair of redundant ( ) needs to be inserted around the argments to deduce( ) in the sizeof expression.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, having developed my own version using that posts ideas, i found the idea has some other drawbacks so i removed the code from my answer again. One is that all functions have to be public in the target type. So you cannot check for a "f" function in this: struct g { void f(); private: void f(int); }; because one of the functions is private (this is because the code does using g::f;, which makes it fail if any f is not accessible). –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jul 8 '09 at 19:56

MSVC has the __if_exists and __if_not_exists keywords (Doc). Together with the typeof-SFINAE approach of Nicola I could create a check for GCC and MSVC like the OP looked for.

Update: Source can be found Here

share|improve this answer

I wrote an answer to this in another thread that (unlike the solutions above) also checks inherited member functions:

SFINAE to check for inherited member functions

Here are some example from that solution:

Example1:

We are checking for a member with the following signature: T::const_iterator begin() const

template<class T> struct has_const_begin
{
    typedef char (&Yes)[1];
    typedef char (&No)[2];

    template<class U> 
    static Yes test(U const * data, 
                    typename std::enable_if<std::is_same<
                             typename U::const_iterator, 
                             decltype(data->begin())
                    >::value>::type * = 0);
    static No test(...);
    static const bool value = sizeof(Yes) == sizeof(has_const_begin::test((typename std::remove_reference<T>::type*)0));
};

Please notice that it even checks the constness of the method, and works with primitive types, as well. (I mean has_const_begin<int>::value is false and doesn't cause a compile-time error.)

Example 2

Now we are looking for the signature: void foo(MyClass&, unsigned)

template<class T> struct has_foo
{
    typedef char (&Yes)[1];
    typedef char (&No)[2];

    template<class U>
    static Yes test(U * data, MyClass* arg1 = 0,
                    typename std::enable_if<std::is_void<
                             decltype(data->foo(*arg1, 1u))
                    >::value>::type * = 0);
    static No test(...);
    static const bool value = sizeof(Yes) == sizeof(has_foo::test((typename std::remove_reference<T>::type*)0));
};

Please notice that MyClass doesn't has to be default constructible or to satisfy any special concept. The technique works with template members, as well.

I am eagerly waiting opinions regarding this.

share|improve this answer

Boost.TTI

There is a somewhat idiomatic way to do such a check thanks to Boost.TTI, introduced in Boost 1.54.0. For your example, you would have to use the macro BOOST_TTI_HAS_MEMBER_FUNCTION. Here is how you could use it:

#include <boost/tti/has_member_function.hpp>

// Generate the metafunction
BOOST_TTI_HAS_MEMBER_FUNCTION(toString)

// Check whether T has a member function toString
// which takes no parameter and returns a std::string
bool foo = has_member_function_toString<T, std::string>::value;

Then, you could use the bool (possibly made constexpr) to create a SFINAE check.

Explanation

The macro BOOST_TTI_HAS_MEMBER_FUNCTION generates the metafunction has_member_function_toString which takes the checked type as its first template parameter. The second template parameter corresponds to the return type of the member function, and the following parameters correspond to the types of the function's parameters. The member value contains true if the class T has a member function std::string toString().

Alternatively, has_member_function_toString can take a member function pointer as a template parameter. Therefore, it is possible to replace has_member_function_toString<T, std::string>::value by has_member_function_toString<std::string T::* ()>::value which

share|improve this answer

Strange nobody suggested the following nice trick I saw once on this very site :

template <class T>
struct has_foo
{
    struct S { void foo(...); };
    struct derived : S, T {};

    template <typename V, V> struct W {};

    template <typename X>
    char (&test(W<void (X::*)(), &X::foo> *))[1];

    template <typename>
    char (&test(...))[2];

    static const bool value = sizeof(test<derived>(0)) == 1;
};

You have to make sure T is a class. It seems that ambiguity in the lookup of foo is a substitution failure. I made it work on gcc, not sure if it is standard though.

share|improve this answer

Here are some usage snippets: *The guts for all this are farther down

Check for member x in a given class. Could be var, func, class, union, or enum:

CREATE_MEMBER_CHECK(x);
bool has_x = has_member_x<class_to_check_for_x>::value;

Check for member function void x():

//Func signature MUST have T as template variable here... simpler this way :\
CREATE_MEMBER_FUNC_SIG_CHECK(x, void (T::*)(), void__x);
bool has_func_sig_void__x = has_member_func_void__x<class_to_check_for_x>::value;

Check for member variable x:

CREATE_MEMBER_VAR_CHECK(x);
bool has_var_x = has_member_var_x<class_to_check_for_x>::value;

Check for member class x:

CREATE_MEMBER_CLASS_CHECK(x);
bool has_class_x = has_member_class_x<class_to_check_for_x>::value;

Check for member union x:

CREATE_MEMBER_UNION_CHECK(x);
bool has_union_x = has_member_union_x<class_to_check_for_x>::value;

Check for member enum x:

CREATE_MEMBER_ENUM_CHECK(x);
bool has_enum_x = has_member_enum_x<class_to_check_for_x>::value;

Check for any member function x regardless of signature:

CREATE_MEMBER_CHECK(x);
CREATE_MEMBER_VAR_CHECK(x);
CREATE_MEMBER_CLASS_CHECK(x);
CREATE_MEMBER_UNION_CHECK(x);
CREATE_MEMBER_ENUM_CHECK(x);
CREATE_MEMBER_FUNC_CHECK(x);
bool has_any_func_x = has_member_func_x<class_to_check_for_x>::value;

OR

CREATE_MEMBER_CHECKS(x);  //Just stamps out the same macro calls as above.
bool has_any_func_x = has_member_func_x<class_to_check_for_x>::value;

Details and core:

/*
    - Multiple inheritance forces ambiguity of member names.
    - SFINAE is used to make aliases to member names.
    - Expression SFINAE is used in just one generic has_member that can accept
      any alias we pass it.
*/

//Variadic to force ambiguity of class members.  C++11 and up.
template <typename... Args> struct ambiguate : public Args... {};

//Non-variadic version of the line above.
//template <typename A, typename B> struct ambiguate : public A, public B {};

template<typename A, typename = void>
struct got_type : std::false_type {};

template<typename A>
struct got_type<A> : std::true_type {
    typedef A type;
};

template<typename T, T>
struct sig_check : std::true_type {};

template<typename Alias, typename AmbiguitySeed>
struct has_member {
    template<typename C> static char ((&f(decltype(&C::value))))[1];
    template<typename C> static char ((&f(...)))[2];

    //Make sure the member name is consistently spelled the same.
    static_assert(
        (sizeof(f<AmbiguitySeed>(0)) == 1)
        , "Member name specified in AmbiguitySeed is different from member name specified in Alias, or wrong Alias/AmbiguitySeed has been specified."
    );

    static bool const value = sizeof(f<Alias>(0)) == 2;
};

Macros (El Diablo!):

CREATE_MEMBER_CHECK:

//Check for any member with given name, whether var, func, class, union, enum.
#define CREATE_MEMBER_CHECK(member)                                         \
                                                                            \
template<typename T, typename = std::true_type>                             \
struct Alias_##member;                                                      \
                                                                            \
template<typename T>                                                        \
struct Alias_##member <                                                     \
    T, std::integral_constant<bool, got_type<decltype(&T::member)>::value>  \
> { static const decltype(&T::member) value; };                             \
                                                                            \
struct AmbiguitySeed_##member { char member; };                             \
                                                                            \
template<typename T>                                                        \
struct has_member_##member {                                                \
    static const bool value                                                 \
        = has_member<                                                       \
            Alias_##member<ambiguate<T, AmbiguitySeed_##member>>            \
            , Alias_##member<AmbiguitySeed_##member>                        \
        >::value                                                            \
    ;                                                                       \
}

CREATE_MEMBER_VAR_CHECK:

//Check for member variable with given name.
#define CREATE_MEMBER_VAR_CHECK(var_name)                                   \
                                                                            \
template<typename T, typename = std::true_type>                             \
struct has_member_var_##var_name : std::false_type {};                      \
                                                                            \
template<typename T>                                                        \
struct has_member_var_##var_name<                                           \
    T                                                                       \
    , std::integral_constant<                                               \
        bool                                                                \
        , !std::is_member_function_pointer<decltype(&T::var_name)>::value   \
    >                                                                       \
> : std::true_type {}

CREATE_MEMBER_FUNC_SIG_CHECK:

//Check for member function with given name AND signature.
#define CREATE_MEMBER_FUNC_SIG_CHECK(func_name, func_sig, templ_postfix)    \
                                                                            \
template<typename T, typename = std::true_type>                             \
struct has_member_func_##templ_postfix : std::false_type {};                \
                                                                            \
template<typename T>                                                        \
struct has_member_func_##templ_postfix<                                     \
    T, std::integral_constant<                                              \
        bool                                                                \
        , sig_check<func_sig, &T::func_name>::value                         \
    >                                                                       \
> : std::true_type {}

CREATE_MEMBER_CLASS_CHECK:

//Check for member class with given name.
#define CREATE_MEMBER_CLASS_CHECK(class_name)               \
                                                            \
template<typename T, typename = std::true_type>             \
struct has_member_class_##class_name : std::false_type {};  \
                                                            \
template<typename T>                                        \
struct has_member_class_##class_name<                       \
    T                                                       \
    , std::integral_constant<                               \
        bool                                                \
        , std::is_class<                                    \
            typename got_type<typename T::class_name>::type \
        >::value                                            \
    >                                                       \
> : std::true_type {}

CREATE_MEMBER_UNION_CHECK:

//Check for member union with given name.
#define CREATE_MEMBER_UNION_CHECK(union_name)               \
                                                            \
template<typename T, typename = std::true_type>             \
struct has_member_union_##union_name : std::false_type {};  \
                                                            \
template<typename T>                                        \
struct has_member_union_##union_name<                       \
    T                                                       \
    , std::integral_constant<                               \
        bool                                                \
        , std::is_union<                                    \
            typename got_type<typename T::union_name>::type \
        >::value                                            \
    >                                                       \
> : std::true_type {}

CREATE_MEMBER_ENUM_CHECK:

//Check for member enum with given name.
#define CREATE_MEMBER_ENUM_CHECK(enum_name)                 \
                                                            \
template<typename T, typename = std::true_type>             \
struct has_member_enum_##enum_name : std::false_type {};    \
                                                            \
template<typename T>                                        \
struct has_member_enum_##enum_name<                         \
    T                                                       \
    , std::integral_constant<                               \
        bool                                                \
        , std::is_enum<                                     \
            typename got_type<typename T::enum_name>::type  \
        >::value                                            \
    >                                                       \
> : std::true_type {}

CREATE_MEMBER_FUNC_CHECK:

//Check for function with given name, any signature.
#define CREATE_MEMBER_FUNC_CHECK(func)          \
template<typename T>                            \
struct has_member_func_##func {                 \
    static const bool value                     \
        = has_member_##func<T>::value           \
        && !has_member_var_##func<T>::value     \
        && !has_member_class_##func<T>::value   \
        && !has_member_union_##func<T>::value   \
        && !has_member_enum_##func<T>::value    \
    ;                                           \
}

CREATE_MEMBER_CHECKS:

//Create all the checks for one member.  Does NOT include func sig checks.
#define CREATE_MEMBER_CHECKS(member)    \
CREATE_MEMBER_CHECK(member);            \
CREATE_MEMBER_VAR_CHECK(member);        \
CREATE_MEMBER_CLASS_CHECK(member);      \
CREATE_MEMBER_UNION_CHECK(member);      \
CREATE_MEMBER_ENUM_CHECK(member);       \
CREATE_MEMBER_FUNC_CHECK(member)
share|improve this answer

SFINAE can detect an existing member function. A missing function can then be handled by the default case.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with Nicola. Luc: show us working code. –  Leon Timmermans Nov 2 '08 at 20:48
    
Sorry for the hurried reply. With SFINAE is possible to test if a given method is available in a class –  Nicola Bonelli Nov 2 '08 at 21:12

Here is my version that handles all possible member function overloads with arbitrary arity, including template member functions, possibly with default arguments. It distinguishes 3 mutually exclusive scenarios when making a member function call to some class type, with given arg types: (1) valid, or (2) ambiguous, or (3) non-viable. Example usage:

#include <string>
#include <vector>

HAS_MEM(bar)
HAS_MEM_FUN_CALL(bar)

struct test
{
   void bar(int);
   void bar(double);
   void bar(int,double);

   template < typename T >
   typename std::enable_if< not std::is_integral<T>::value >::type
   bar(const T&, int=0){}

   template < typename T >
   typename std::enable_if< std::is_integral<T>::value >::type
   bar(const std::vector<T>&, T*){}

   template < typename T >
   int bar(const std::string&, int){}
};

Now you can use it like this:

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
   static_assert( has_mem_bar<test>::value , "");

   static_assert( has_valid_mem_fun_call_bar<test(char const*,long)>::value , "");
   static_assert( has_valid_mem_fun_call_bar<test(std::string&,long)>::value , "");

   static_assert( has_valid_mem_fun_call_bar<test(std::vector<int>, int*)>::value , "");
   static_assert( has_no_viable_mem_fun_call_bar<test(std::vector<double>, double*)>::value , "");

   static_assert( has_valid_mem_fun_call_bar<test(int)>::value , "");
   static_assert( std::is_same<void,result_of_mem_fun_call_bar<test(int)>::type>::value , "");

   static_assert( has_valid_mem_fun_call_bar<test(int,double)>::value , "");
   static_assert( not has_valid_mem_fun_call_bar<test(int,double,int)>::value , "");

   static_assert( not has_ambiguous_mem_fun_call_bar<test(double)>::value , "");
   static_assert( has_ambiguous_mem_fun_call_bar<test(unsigned)>::value , "");

   static_assert( has_viable_mem_fun_call_bar<test(unsigned)>::value , "");
   static_assert( has_viable_mem_fun_call_bar<test(int)>::value , "");

   static_assert( has_no_viable_mem_fun_call_bar<test(void)>::value , "");

   return 0;
}

Here is the code, written in c++11, however, you can easily port it (with minor tweaks) to non-c++11 that has typeof extensions (e.g. gcc). You can replace the HAS_MEM macro with your own.

#pragma once

#if __cplusplus >= 201103

#include <utility>
#include <type_traits>

#define HAS_MEM(mem)                                                                                     \
                                                                                                     \
template < typename T >                                                                               \
struct has_mem_##mem                                                                                  \
{                                                                                                     \
  struct yes {};                                                                                     \
  struct no  {};                                                                                     \
                                                                                                     \
  struct ambiguate_seed { char mem; };                                                               \
  template < typename U > struct ambiguate : U, ambiguate_seed {};                                   \
                                                                                                     \
  template < typename U, typename = decltype(&U::mem) > static constexpr no  test(int);              \
  template < typename                                 > static constexpr yes test(...);              \
                                                                                                     \
  static bool constexpr value = std::is_same<decltype(test< ambiguate<T> >(0)),yes>::value ;         \
  typedef std::integral_constant<bool,value>    type;                                                \
};


#define HAS_MEM_FUN_CALL(memfun)                                                                         \
                                                                                                     \
template < typename Signature >                                                                       \
struct has_valid_mem_fun_call_##memfun;                                                               \
                                                                                                     \
template < typename T, typename... Args >                                                             \
struct has_valid_mem_fun_call_##memfun< T(Args...) >                                                  \
{                                                                                                     \
  struct yes {};                                                                                     \
  struct no  {};                                                                                     \
                                                                                                     \
  template < typename U, bool = has_mem_##memfun<U>::value >                                         \
  struct impl                                                                                        \
  {                                                                                                  \
     template < typename V, typename = decltype(std::declval<V>().memfun(std::declval<Args>()...)) > \
     struct test_result { using type = yes; };                                                       \
                                                                                                     \
     template < typename V > static constexpr typename test_result<V>::type test(int);               \
     template < typename   > static constexpr                            no test(...);               \
                                                                                                     \
     static constexpr bool value = std::is_same<decltype(test<U>(0)),yes>::value;                    \
     using type = std::integral_constant<bool, value>;                                               \
  };                                                                                                 \
                                                                                                     \
  template < typename U >                                                                            \
  struct impl<U,false> : std::false_type {};                                                         \
                                                                                                     \
  static constexpr bool value = impl<T>::value;                                                      \
  using type = std::integral_constant<bool, value>;                                                  \
};                                                                                                    \
                                                                                                     \
template < typename Signature >                                                                       \
struct has_ambiguous_mem_fun_call_##memfun;                                                           \
                                                                                                     \
template < typename T, typename... Args >                                                             \
struct has_ambiguous_mem_fun_call_##memfun< T(Args...) >                                              \
{                                                                                                     \
  struct ambiguate_seed { void memfun(...); };                                                       \
                                                                                                     \
  template < class U, bool = has_mem_##memfun<U>::value >                                            \
  struct ambiguate : U, ambiguate_seed                                                               \
  {                                                                                                  \
    using ambiguate_seed::memfun;                                                                    \
    using U::memfun;                                                                                 \
  };                                                                                                 \
                                                                                                     \
  template < class U >                                                                               \
  struct ambiguate<U,false> : ambiguate_seed {};                                                     \
                                                                                                     \
  static constexpr bool value = not has_valid_mem_fun_call_##memfun< ambiguate<T>(Args...) >::value; \
  using type = std::integral_constant<bool, value>;                                                  \
};                                                                                                    \
                                                                                                     \
template < typename Signature >                                                                       \
struct has_viable_mem_fun_call_##memfun;                                                              \
                                                                                                     \
template < typename T, typename... Args >                                                             \
struct has_viable_mem_fun_call_##memfun< T(Args...) >                                                 \
{                                                                                                     \
  static constexpr bool value = has_valid_mem_fun_call_##memfun<T(Args...)>::value                   \
                             or has_ambiguous_mem_fun_call_##memfun<T(Args...)>::value;              \
  using type = std::integral_constant<bool, value>;                                                  \
};                                                                                                    \
                                                                                                     \
template < typename Signature >                                                                       \
struct has_no_viable_mem_fun_call_##memfun;                                                           \
                                                                                                     \
template < typename T, typename... Args >                                                             \
struct has_no_viable_mem_fun_call_##memfun < T(Args...) >                                             \
{                                                                                                     \
  static constexpr bool value = not has_viable_mem_fun_call_##memfun<T(Args...)>::value;             \
  using type = std::integral_constant<bool, value>;                                                  \
};                                                                                                    \
                                                                                                     \
template < typename Signature >                                                                       \
struct result_of_mem_fun_call_##memfun;                                                               \
                                                                                                     \
template < typename T, typename... Args >                                                             \
struct result_of_mem_fun_call_##memfun< T(Args...) >                                                  \
{                                                                                                     \
  using type = decltype(std::declval<T>().memfun(std::declval<Args>()...));                          \
};

#endif

share|improve this answer

This is a C++11 solution for the general problem if "If I did X, would it compile?"

template<class> struct type_sink { typedef void type; }; // consumes a type, and makes it `void`
template<class T> using type_sink_t = typename type_sink<T>::type;
template<class T, class=void> struct has_to_string : std::false_type {}; \
template<class T> struct has_to_string<
  T,
  type_sink_t< decltype( std::declval<T>().toString() ) >
>: std::true_type 

Trait has_to_string such that has_to_string<T>::value is true if and only if T has a method .toString that can be invoked with 0 arguments in this context.

Next, I'd use tag dispatching:

namespace details {
  template<class T>
  std::string optionalToString_helper(T* obj, std::true_type /*has_to_string*/) {
    return obj->toString();
  }
  template<class T>
  std::string optionalToString_helper(T* obj, std::false_type /*has_to_string*/) {
    return "toString not defined";
  }
}
template<class T>
std::string optionalToString(T* obj) {
  return details::optionalToString_helper( obj, has_to_string<T>{} );
}

which tends to be more maintainable than complex SFINAE expressions.

You can write these traits with a macro if you find yourself doing it alot, but they are relatively simple (a few lines each) so maybe not worth it:

#define MAKE_CODE_TRAIT( TRAIT_NAME, ... ) \
template<class T, class=void> struct TRAIT_NAME : std::false_type {}; \
template<class T> struct TRAIT_NAME< T, type_sink_t< decltype( __VA_ARGS__ ) > >: std::true_type {};

what the above does is create a macro MAKE_CODE_TRAIT. You pass it the name of the trait you want, and some code that can test the type T. Thus:

MAKE_CODE_TRAIT( has_to_string, std::declval<T>().toString() )

creates the above traits class.

As an aside, the above technique is part of what MS calls "expression SFINAE", and their 2013 compiler fails pretty hard.

Note that in C++1y the following syntax is possible:

template<class T>
std::string optionalToString(T* obj) {
  return compiled_if< has_to_string >(*obj, [&](auto&& obj) {
    return obj.toString();
  }) *compiled_else ([&]{ 
    return "toString not defined";
  });
}

which is an inline compilation conditional branch that abuses lots of C++ features. Doing so is probably not worth it, as the benefit (of code being inline) is not worth the cost (of next to nobody understanding how it works), but the existence of that above solution may be of interest.

share|improve this answer
    
Does this handle private cases? –  tower120 Jun 22 at 19:17
    
@tower120 I would have to experiment: how templates interact with private/public/protected is a bit obscure to me. It will not matter where you invoke has_to_string however. –  Yakk Jun 22 at 19:22
    
than it not handle them... Maybe with C++20 than... –  tower120 Jun 22 at 19:31
    
but you know, if look from the other side... We can reach protected members from the Derived class. Maybe if put all this stuff INSIDE class, and convert from structs to constexpr functions... –  tower120 Jun 22 at 19:38
    
Here, look at this coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/ee94d16e7c07e093 I just can't make it constexpr –  tower120 Jun 22 at 19:48

I don't know Boost but it kinda looks like you could try binding to a class member function and then base on error it returns...

share|improve this answer
    
Would be a compile-time error. –  MSalters Feb 2 '09 at 9:05

Here is another C++03 way to find if a method exists or not. Find it little easier and less trickier so posting for the reference.

First declare a macro which creates such SFINAE class when invoked

#define Contains(NAME) \
template<typename T> \
struct Contains_##NAME \
{ \
  typedef char (&yes)[2]; \
\
  template<unsigned int> struct exists; \
  template<typename V> static yes checkFunc (exists<sizeof(&V::NAME)>*); \
  template<typename> static char checkFunc (...); \
\
  static const bool value = (sizeof(checkFunc<T>(0)) == sizeof(yes)); \
}

Instantiate:

Contains(begin); // creates a class named `Contains_begin<T>`

Usage:

Contains_begin<X>::value;

Disclaimer: Only one member named begin should be inside the class. If there are more than 1 (e.g. const and non-const versions or overloads), then this SFINAE trick fails. Though I haven't checked but believe that this problem is applicable to other answers as well.


Update: Above problem mentioned in the disclaimer can be solved by editing the Contains macro a little bit as below:

#define ContainsType(NAME) \
template<typename T, typename Function> \
struct ContainsType_##NAME \
{ \
  typedef char (&yes)[2]; \
\
  template<unsigned int> struct exists; \
  template<typename V> static yes checkFunc (exists<sizeof(static_cast<Function>(&V::NAME))>*); \
  template<typename> static char checkFunc (...); \
\
  static const bool value = (sizeof(checkFunc<T>(0)) == sizeof(yes)); \
}

Instantiate in the same manner as Contains:

ContainsType(begin);

Use it as:

ContainsType_begin<X, int (X::*)() const>::value
//                    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ static/nonstatic method type

Here is a working demo with both Contains and ContainsType.

share|improve this answer

How about this solution?

#include <type_traits>

template <typename U, typename = void> struct hasToString : std::false_type { };

template <typename U>
struct hasToString<U,
  typename std::enable_if<bool(sizeof(&U::toString))>::type
> : std::true_type { };
share|improve this answer
    
Fails if toString is overloaded, as &U::toString is ambiguous. –  Yakk Jun 2 at 13:40
    
@Yakk I think a cast can fix this problem. –  user1095108 Jun 2 at 19:06

I modified the solution provided in http://stackoverflow.com/a/264088/2712152 to make it a bit more general. Also since it doesn't use any of the new C++11 features we can use it with old compilers and should also work with msvc. But the compilers should enable C99 to use this since it uses variadic macros.

The following macro can be used to check if a particular class has a particular typedef or not.

 * @class      : HAS_TYPEDEF
 * @brief      : This macro will be used to check if a class has a particular
 * typedef or not.
 * @param typedef_name : Name of Typedef
 * @param name  : Name of struct which is going to be run the test for
 * the given particular typedef specified in typedef_name
 */
#define HAS_TYPEDEF(typedef_name, name)                           \
   template <typename T>                                          \
   struct name {                                                  \
      typedef char yes[1];                                        \
      typedef char no[2];                                         \
      template <typename U>                                       \
      struct type_check;                                          \
      template <typename _1>                                      \
      static yes& chk(type_check<typename _1::typedef_name>*);    \
      template <typename>                                         \
      static no& chk(...);                                        \
      static bool const value = sizeof(chk<T>(0)) == sizeof(yes); \
   }

The following macro can be used to check if a particular class has a particular member function or not with any given number of arguments.

 * @class      : HAS_MEM_FUNC
 * @brief      : This macro will be used to check if a class has a particular
 * member function implemented in the public section or not. 
 * @param func : Name of Member Function
 * @param name : Name of struct which is going to be run the test for
 * the given particular member function name specified in func
 * @param return_type: Return type of the member function
 * @param ellipsis(...) : Since this is macro should provide test case for every
 * possible member function we use variadic macros to cover all possibilities
 */
#define HAS_MEM_FUNC(func, name, return_type, ...)                \
   template <typename T>                                          \
   struct name {                                                  \
      typedef return_type (T::*Sign)(__VA_ARGS__);                \
      typedef char yes[1];                                        \
      typedef char no[2];                                         \
      template <typename U, U>                                    \
      struct type_check;                                          \
      template <typename _1>                                      \
      static yes& chk(type_check<Sign, &_1::func>*);              \
      template <typename>                                         \
      static no& chk(...);                                        \
      static bool const value = sizeof(chk<T>(0)) == sizeof(yes); \
   }

We can use the above 2 macros to perform the checks for has_typedef and has_mem_func as:

class A {
public:
  typedef int check;
  void check_function() {}
};

class B {
public:
  void hello(int a, double b) {}
  void hello() {}
};

HAS_MEM_FUNC(check_function, has_check_function, void, void);
HAS_MEM_FUNC(hello, hello_check, void, int, double);
HAS_MEM_FUNC(hello, hello_void_check, void, void);
HAS_TYPEDEF(check, has_typedef_check);

int main() {
  std::cout << "Check Function A:" << has_check_function<A>::value << std::endl;
  std::cout << "Check Function B:" << has_check_function<B>::value << std::endl;
  std::cout << "Hello Function A:" << hello_check<A>::value << std::endl;
  std::cout << "Hello Function B:" << hello_check<B>::value << std::endl;
  std::cout << "Hello void Function A:" << hello_void_check<A>::value << std::endl;
  std::cout << "Hello void Function B:" << hello_void_check<B>::value << std::endl;
  std::cout << "Check Typedef A:" << has_typedef_check<A>::value << std::endl;
  std::cout << "Check Typedef B:" << has_typedef_check<B>::value << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer

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