Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a date object from which I'd like to render an HTML snippet like <abbr title="2010-04-02T14:12:07">A couple days ago</abbr>. I have the "relative time in words" portion from another library. How do I render the title portion?

I've tried the following:

function isoDate(msSinceEpoch) { var d = new Date(msSinceEpoch); return d.getUTCFullYear() + '-' + (d.getUTCMonth() + 1) + '-' + d.getUTCDate() + 'T' + d.getUTCHours() + ':' + d.getUTCMinutes() + ':' + d.getUTCSeconds(); }

But that gives me

"2010-4-2T3:19"
share|improve this question
1  
Note that ISO 8601 explicitly uses two-digit months and days. Same for the time parts, so what you have here is actually far from being ISO 8601. –  Јοеу Apr 4 '10 at 4:20
2  
Last example on page: developer.mozilla.org/en/… –  dev-null-dweller Apr 4 '10 at 6:29
    
Yeah, that was my point, Johannes. See my comment to kaiz.net's answer (which itself was helpful). –  James A. Rosen Apr 5 '10 at 1:44
    
@dev-null-dweller I was hoping for an answer without an external library, so your link is perfect. I'll accept it if you post is as a separate answer. –  James A. Rosen Apr 5 '10 at 12:58
1  
there is a + missing at the end of the first line !! that's all :D –  Pizzaiola Gorgonzola Mar 26 at 20:18
show 1 more comment

8 Answers

up vote 151 down vote accepted

There is already function called toISOString in ecmascript 5.

var date = new Date();
date.toISOString(); //"2011-12-19T15:28:46.493Z"

Of course not all browsers support ecmascript 5.

What we can do is to provide a "backup plan", our own prototype function if Date.prototype.toISOString doesn't exist (MDN):

if ( !Date.prototype.toISOString ) {
  ( function() {

    function pad(number) {
      var r = String(number);
      if ( r.length === 1 ) {
        r = '0' + r;
      }
      return r;
    }

    Date.prototype.toISOString = function() {
      return this.getUTCFullYear()
        + '-' + pad( this.getUTCMonth() + 1 )
        + '-' + pad( this.getUTCDate() )
        + 'T' + pad( this.getUTCHours() )
        + ':' + pad( this.getUTCMinutes() )
        + ':' + pad( this.getUTCSeconds() )
        + '.' + String( (this.getUTCMilliseconds()/1000).toFixed(3) ).slice( 2, 5 )
        + 'Z';
    };

  }() );
}
share|improve this answer
    
.toISOString() definitely returns the date in UTC? –  CrimsonChin Dec 12 '12 at 9:32
1  
Not in all browsers, as stated: kangax.github.com/es5-compat-table –  Alastair Feb 9 '13 at 8:15
2  
I tried to edit this, but it got rejected (pfft!). Could you please recognise that the native EMCAScript5 version will produce the milliseconds in the string too, whilst your code will not. MDN have a good example here, if you want to update the code so that it accurately reflects the native version. –  Ian Clark Aug 5 '13 at 14:40
1  
Thank you, @IanClark. I'll update my post. –  Anatoly Mironov Aug 5 '13 at 14:55
add comment

Last example on page: https://developer.mozilla.org/en/Core_JavaScript_1.5_Reference:Global_Objects:Date

/* use a function for the exact format desired... */
function ISODateString(d){
 function pad(n){return n<10 ? '0'+n : n}
 return d.getUTCFullYear()+'-'
      + pad(d.getUTCMonth()+1)+'-'
      + pad(d.getUTCDate())+'T'
      + pad(d.getUTCHours())+':'
      + pad(d.getUTCMinutes())+':'
      + pad(d.getUTCSeconds())+'Z'}

var d = new Date();
console.log(ISODateString(d)); // prints something like 2009-09-28T19:03:12Z
share|improve this answer
add comment

Almost every to-ISO method on the web drops the timezone information by applying a convert to "Z"ulu time (UTC) before outputting the string. Browser's native .toISOString() also drops timezone information.

This discards valuable information, as the server, or recipient, can always convert a full ISO date to Zulu time or whichever timezone it requires, while still getting the timezone information of the sender.

The best solution I've come across is to use the Moment.js javascript library and use the following code:

To get the current ISO time with timezone information and milliseconds

now = moment().format("YYYY-MM-DDTHH:mm:ss.SSSZZ")
// "2013-03-08T20:11:11.234+0100"

now = moment().utc().format("YYYY-MM-DDTHH:mm:ss.SSSZZ")
// "2013-03-08T19:11:11.234+0000"

now = moment().utc().format("YYYY-MM-DDTHH:mm:ss") + "Z"
// "2013-03-08T19:11:11Z" <- better use the native .toISOString() 

To get the ISO time of a native JavaScript Date object with timezone information but without milliseconds

var current_time = Date.now();
moment(current_time).format("YYYY-MM-DDTHH:mm:ssZZ")

This can be combined with Date.js to get functions like Date.today() whose result can then be passed to moment.

A date string formatted like this is JSON compilant, and lends itself well to get stored into a database. Python and C# seem to like it.

share|improve this answer
4  
dont stuff around with dates people. Just use moment.js and save your hair. –  Valamas - AUS Mar 14 '13 at 22:36
    
actually, on python and db's it turned out to be a pain. db's use UTC (no prob, as you can easily convert to UTC server-side), so if you want to keep the offset info you need another field. And Python prefers the use of nanoseconds instead of javascript's milliseconds, which are usually enough and preferrable over plain seconds. On python, only dateutil.parser.parse parses it correctly, and to write millisecond ISO's one requires a "_when = when.strftime("%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%S.%f%z"); return _when[:-8] + _when[-5:]" to convert the nanos to millis. that's not nice. –  Daniel F. Jun 4 '13 at 9:58
    
You can actually just omit the format like so: moment(new Date()).format(). "As of version 1.5.0, calling moment#format without a format will default to ... the ISO8601 format YYYY-MM-DDTHH:mm:ssZ". Doc: Scroll up from momentjs.com/docs/#/displaying/fromnow –  user193130 Feb 20 at 16:50
add comment

If you don't need to support IE7, the following is a great, concise hack:

JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(new Date()))
share|improve this answer
    
for IE7 this decision is fit too if was included json3-library ( bestiejs.github.io/json3 ). Thanks :) –  vladimir77 Oct 1 '13 at 22:39
    
Also fails in IE8. ("'JSON' is undefined") –  Cees Timmerman Oct 3 '13 at 13:55
add comment

There is a '+' missing after the 'T'

isoDate: function(msSinceEpoch) {
  var d = new Date(msSinceEpoch);
  return d.getUTCFullYear() + '-' + (d.getUTCMonth() + 1) + '-' + d.getUTCDate() + 'T'
         + d.getUTCHours() + ':' + d.getUTCMinutes() + ':' + d.getUTCSeconds();
}

should do it.

For the leading zeros you could use this from here:

function PadDigits(n, totalDigits) 
{ 
    n = n.toString(); 
    var pd = ''; 
    if (totalDigits > n.length) 
    { 
        for (i=0; i < (totalDigits-n.length); i++) 
        { 
            pd += '0'; 
        } 
    } 
    return pd + n.toString(); 
} 

Using it like this:

PadDigits(d.getUTCHours(),2)
share|improve this answer
    
Great catch! It doesn't address the missing "0"s, though. –  James A. Rosen Apr 4 '10 at 4:20
1  
Write a function to convert an integer to a 2-character string (prepending a '0' if the argument is less than 10), and call it for each part of the date/time. –  dan04 Apr 4 '10 at 4:46
add comment

Shortest, but not supported by IE8 and earlier :

new Date().toJSON()
share|improve this answer
add comment

I would just use this small extension to Date - http://blog.stevenlevithan.com/archives/date-time-format

var date = new Date(msSinceEpoch);
date.format("isoDateTime"); // 2007-06-09T17:46:21
share|improve this answer
add comment

I typically don't want to display a UTC date since customers don't like doing the conversion in their head. To display a local ISO date, I use the function:

function toLocalIsoString(date, includeSeconds) {
    function pad(n) { return n < 10 ? '0' + n : n }
    var localIsoString = date.getFullYear() + '-'
        + pad(date.getMonth() + 1) + '-'
        + pad(date.getDate()) + 'T'
        + pad(date.getHours()) + ':'
        + pad(date.getMinutes()) + ':'
        + pad(date.getSeconds());
    if(date.getTimezoneOffset() == 0) localIsoString += 'Z';
    return localIsoString;
};

The function above omits time zone offset information (except if local time happens to be UTC), so I use the function below to show the local offset in a single location. You can also append its output to results from the above function if you wish to show the offset in each and every time:

function getOffsetFromUTC() {
    var offset = new Date().getTimezoneOffset();
    return ((offset < 0 ? '+' : '-')
        + pad(Math.abs(offset / 60), 2)
        + pad(Math.abs(offset % 60), 2))
};

toLocalIsoString uses pad. If needed, it works like nearly any pad function, but for the sake of completeness this is what I use:

// Pad a number to length using padChar
function pad(number, length, padChar) {
    if (typeof length === 'undefined') length = 2;
    if (typeof padChar === 'undefined') padChar = '0';
    var str = "" + number;
    while (str.length < length) {
        str = padChar + str;
    }
    return str;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.