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I use the Call keyword when calling subs in VB/VBA. I know it's optional, but is it better to use it or leave it off? I've always thought it was more explicit, but maybe it's just noise.

Also, I read this on another forum: Using the Call keyword is faster because it knows that it is not going to return any values, so it doesn't need to set up any stackspace to make room for the return value.

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In some cases using the call keyword is pretty useful, like when you just want to use a class once. I use it today to generate a random salt Call New RNGCryptoServiceProvider().GetBytes(salt) without Call I would have had to a variable as an RNGCryptoServiceProvider first –  yu_ominae Dec 12 '12 at 2:56
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5 Answers

Ah ha. I have long wondered about this and even reading a two inch thick book on VBA basically says don't use it unless you want to use the Find feature of the VBE to easily find calls in large projects.

But I just found another use.

We know that it's possible to concatenate lines of code with the colon character, for example:

Function Test(mode as Boolean) 
    if mode = True then x = x + 1 : Exit Sub
    y = y - 1
End Sub

But if you do this with procedure calls at the beginning of a line, the VBE assumes that you're referring to a label and removes any indents, aligning the line to the left margin (even though the procedure is called as intended):

Function Test()
Function1 : Function2
End Function

Using the Call statement allows concatenation of procedure calls while maintaining your code indents:

Function Test()
    Call Function1 : Call Function2
End Function

If you don't use the Call statement in the above example, the VBE will assume that "Function1" is an label and left align it in the code window, even though it won't cause an error.

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For VB6, if there is any chance it will be converted to VB.NET, using Call means the syntax doesn't change. (Parentheses are required in VB.NET for method calls.) (I don't personally think this is worth the bother -- any .NET converter will at least be able to put in parentheses when required. I'm just listing it as a reason.)

Otherwise it is just syntactic sugar.

Note the Call keyword is likely not to be faster when calling some other method/function because a function returns its value anyway, and VB didn't need to create a local variable to receive it, even when Call is not used.

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No, it'll just add 7 characters per call with no given benefit.

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I always use Call in VBA. To me, it just looks cleaner. But, I agree, it's just syntactic sugar, which puts it squarely the realm of personal preference. I've come across probably a dozen full time VBA guys in the past few years, and not one of them used Call. This had to added advantage that I always knew which code was mine. :p

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I use Call for all VBA development of common library functions that I possibly will use in VB.NET. This allows me to move code using copy and paste between all the flavors of VB. I do this to avoid the syntax errors that the code editor creates when it "formats" or "pretty prints" the pasted code. The only edits are usually Set statement inclusion/exclusion.

If you have no plans to move your VB/VBA code to VB.NET, then there is no need to use the Call statement.

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