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I'm working on a quite simple Webpage (MVC2), using localisation based on Resource Files.

I have the MVC2 Project and the Resources in a seperate Assembly.

The Resources contains 3 languages (Resource.resx, Resource.de.resx, Resource.en.resx, Resource.ja.resx) and I'm querying them via the ResourceManager.

Call from the .aspx page:

<% Resources.Res resman = new Resources.Res(); %>
<%=resman.GetString("String1", new System.Globalization.CultureInfo("en")) %><br />
<%=resman.GetString("String1", new System.Globalization.CultureInfo("ja")) %><br />
<%=resman.GetString("String1", new System.Globalization.CultureInfo("de")) %><br />

The ResourceManager:

public class Res
{
  private readonly ResourceManager Manager = Resources.Resource1.ResourceManager;

  public string GetString(string id, CultureInfo info)
  {
    return Manager.GetString(id, info);
  }
}

Gor the compiled version in VS2008 I get something like this:

String1EN

String1JA

String1DE

Compiled in Visual Studio 2008, this works fine, but I'm having trouble if I compile the solution in Visual Studio 2010 (also 3.5 as TargetFramework).

There the result shows something like:

String1DEFAULT

String1JA

String1DEFAULT

I don't know what it can be: is this still a bug from the VS2010 RC or am I doing something wrong here?

UPDATE: I found out that it works on IIS 7.5, but not on IIS 7.0. Unfortunately its not a solution for me.

share|improve this question
    
"Something" !!! – joshcomley Jan 10 '11 at 14:54
    
@josh - fixed that shorthand. – Kev Jan 22 '11 at 12:39

I know this isn't exactly an answer but I thought of some things that might help you if you have really hit a brick wall on this ...

It might be useful to be able to look at the .net code and see what is happening. If you want to try this, do the following:

  • In Visual Studio go to Tools -> Options -> Debugging -> Symbols
  • Where it says Symbol file (.pdb) locations, type

    http://msdl.microsoft.com/download/symbols

  • Supply a path where it says "Cache symbols from symbol store to this directory:"

  • Hit ok
  • A dialog will appear, accept the terms

Now when you debug you should be able to step into the resource manager code.

If this still doesn't work for you and all else fails you can always work around your problem by writing your own resource manager. You can do this by implementing IResourceReader. I found a sample here that gives an example:

Custom Resource Reader

share|improve this answer

It should just work. So the question is to figure out what is missing:

Are the right DLLs in the right sub folders in your bin dir?

If you dump the loaded DLLs (AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies()) before and after these calls, is it showing you that it has loaded the DLLs?

Does IIS have proper permission to the DLLs?

Does it work if you compile in .NET 3.5 mode in VS2010, if not what is the difference in the compiled DLLs?

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I didn't figure out what was going wrong. But since VS2010 and .NET 4.0 was released yesterday, I got the chance to try it out with the released version and it worked fine.

So I guess it was just a bug in the RC which was fixed now.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for letting us know... There were so many problems with the resx handling in the betas, hope they fixed them all – Cine Apr 14 '10 at 1:53
    
Sadly no. The bug is still there, it's only fixed if you are targeting 4.0; we are targeting 2.0, and are stuck :/ – Joel in Gö Jan 11 '11 at 11:48
    
you should mark your answer as the accepted solution – Kev Jan 22 '11 at 12:40

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