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Is there a way to forward-declare the HINSTANCE type from the WinAPI without including the full (and big) windows.h header?

For example, if I have a class RenderWindow which owns an HINSTANCE mInstance, i will have to include windows.h in RenderWindow.h. So everything that needs RenderWindow also has to include windows.h.

I tried including windef.h but this seems to need some things from windows.h. :-( If I can't forward declare it, is there at least a portable way to use something like long mInstance in RenderWindow instead of HINSTANCE?

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Is including windows.h actually causing you any problems? –  anon Apr 4 '10 at 13:47
1  
not directly, but i don't like including it because one has to sometimes undefine min and max macros and i think it increases compile time / look up etc. –  abenthy Apr 4 '10 at 13:52
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#define NOMINMAX before including <windows.h>. –  James McNellis Apr 4 '10 at 15:11
3  
I can think of a half dozen good reasons to want to avoid including it. min/max, macros of commonly used names (CreateWindow, for example), and the fact that it doesn't compile as C++. You have to enable Microsoft's language extensions. windows.h is badly behaved in every possible way. –  jalf Apr 4 '10 at 16:46
    
For those landed here looking for replacement of HINSTANCE with C pointer type void * (I give up for now) there is a heated discussion about its opacity. –  Salvador Apr 4 at 16:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

HINSTANCE is declared in WinDef.h as typedef HINSTANCE__* HINSTANCE;

You may write in your headers:

#ifndef _WINDEF_
class HINSTANCE__; // Forward or never
typedef HINSTANCE__* HINSTANCE;
#endif

You will get compilation errors referencing a HINSTANCE when WinDef.h is not included.

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1  
That's the hack i was searching for, very clever! (HINSTANCE__ seems to be struct here on MSVC2005) –  abenthy Apr 4 '10 at 20:16
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It's no hack, Windef.h is written to allow it :-) Declaring a class instead of a struct guarantees a compiler error if Windef.h is included later, which means bad file structure design. –  Alain Rist Apr 4 '10 at 20:42
    
I see, but if i i use class i get a compiler error if i later include windows.h in my implementation file, in which i need windows.h. Is it bad file structure to use you're suggested typedef in a header file and include windows.h in the corresponding source file? –  abenthy Apr 5 '10 at 6:36
1  
If you need Windows.h in this compilation unit, include it at first, as other library headers, before your own. –  Alain Rist Apr 5 '10 at 7:19

You could declare it void* and cast the errors away. This is close to a never-ending battle though, sooner or later you'll get tripped up. Use pre-compiled headers so you don't care about the size of windows.h

stdafx.h:

#define WIN32_LEAN_AND_MEAN
#include <windows.h>
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For example, if I have a class RenderWindow which owns an HINSTANCE mInstance, i will have to include windows.h in RenderWindow.h. So everything that needs RenderWindow also has to include windows.h.

Have you looked at the Pimpl idiom? This allows you to hide private members. A side-effect is that you don't have to include their headers in your class' header.

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Yup, Pimpl is how I usually do this. –  jalf Apr 4 '10 at 16:46
    
Thanks for the suggestion. I never the less have to say that i prefer Alain Rist's solution. –  abenthy Apr 4 '10 at 20:17

HINSTANCE and friends are opaque types you know nothing about. This is on purpose, and is a good thing.

HINSTANCE is most likely to be a typedef to PVOID, by the way (source). But theoretically the Win32 API is free to change it in the next version (although the chances of this happening are extremely low), so it isn't a good practice to count on it.

Just include windows.h and be done with it.

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