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I am currently learning C by reading a good beginner's book called "Teach Yourself C in 21 Days" (I have already learned Java and C# so I am moving at a much faster pace). I was reading the chapter on pointers and the -> (arrow) operator came up without explanation. I think that it is used to call members and functions (like the equivalent of the . (dot) operator, but for pointers instead of members). But I am not entirely sure. Could I please get an explanation and a code sample?

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32  
Get a better book. norvig.com/21-days.html – joshperry Apr 4 '10 at 16:35
18  
Just a side note - books titled like "teach yourself XXX in XXX days/weeks/hours" usually aren't good. Get a copy of K&R. – qrdl Apr 4 '10 at 17:28
4  
qrdl is correct -- the "Learn X in Y days" books are generally garbage. In addition to K&R, I would also recommend Prata's "C Primer Plus", which goes into more depth than K&R. – J. Taylor Apr 29 '11 at 23:29
    
There's a good explanation in this duplicate question: stackoverflow.com/questions/1238613/… – Ben Nov 13 '12 at 0:48
3  
@Steve That question deals with C++. Calling it a caused some confusion for me when I started reading about operator overloading in that other answer, which is not relevant in C. – Johann May 13 '13 at 19:42
up vote 173 down vote accepted

foo->bar is equivalent to (*foo).bar, i.e. it gets the member called bar from the struct that foo points to.

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3  
It's worth noting that if the dereference operator had been made postfix, as in Pascal, the -> operator would not have been needed at all, as it would have been equivalent to the much more legible foo*.bar. The whole mess of typedef-ing functions with all the extra parentheses would have been avoided as well. – EJP Jan 26 '15 at 6:04
    
Crystal clear! Thanks for saving me some time @sepp2k. – jhrr Mar 17 at 12:42

Yes, that's it.

It's just the dot version when you want to access elements of a struct/class that is a pointer instead of a reference.

struct foo
{
  int x;
  float y;
};

struct foo var;
struct foo* pvar;

var.x = 5;
(&var)->y = 14.3;
pvar->y = 22.4;
(*pvar).x = 6;

That's it!

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11  
Just to point it out (no pun intended), you forgot the ; at the end bracket of the struct, it should be }; – Mohit Deshpande Apr 4 '10 at 16:30
1  
incredible, I was editing it while you were writing the comment.. precog! – Jack Apr 4 '10 at 16:30
6  
This is answer is good for future reference (pun semi intended). – dylnmc Sep 18 '14 at 14:12
    
Since pvar is uninitialised, how would you initialise it if you wanted pvar to point to a new struct, that is not pvar = &var? – CMCDragonkai Sep 26 '15 at 14:27

a->b is just short for (*a).b in every way (same for functions: a->b() is short for (*a).b()).

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foo->bar is only shorthand for (*foo).bar. That's all there is to it.

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I had to make a small change to Jack's program to get it to run. After declaring the struct pointer pvar, point it to the address of var. I found this solution on page 242 of Stephen Kochan's Programming in C.

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
  struct foo
  {
    int x;
    float y;
  };

  struct foo var;
  struct foo* pvar;
  pvar = &var;

  var.x = 5;
  (&var)->y = 14.3;
  printf("%i - %.02f\n", var.x, (&var)->y);
  pvar->x = 6;
  pvar->y = 22.4;
  printf("%i - %.02f\n", pvar->x, pvar->y);
  return 0;
}

Run this in vim with the following command:

:!gcc -o var var.c && ./var

Will output:

5 - 14.30
6 - 22.40
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vim tip: use % to represent the current filename. Like so: !gcc % && ./a.out – jibberia Oct 12 '15 at 8:10
#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
    struct foo
    {
        int x;
        float y;
    } var1;
    struct foo var;
    struct foo* pvar;

    pvar = &var1;
    /* if pvar = &var; it directly 
       takes values stored in var, and if give  
       new > values like pvar->x = 6; pvar->y = 22.4; 
       it modifies the values of var  
       object..so better to give new reference. */
    var.x = 5;
    (&var)->y = 14.3;
    printf("%i - %.02f\n", var.x, (&var)->y);

    pvar->x = 6;
    pvar->y = 22.4;
    printf("%i - %.02f\n", pvar->x, pvar->y);

    return 0;
}
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The -> operator make the code more readable than * operator in some situation.

Such as: (quoted from the EDK II project)

typedef
EFI_STATUS
(EFIAPI *EFI_BLOCK_READ)(
  IN EFI_BLOCK_IO_PROTOCOL          *This,
  IN UINT32                         MediaId,
  IN EFI_LBA                        Lba,
  IN UINTN                          BufferSize,
  OUT VOID                          *Buffer
  );


struct _EFI_BLOCK_IO_PROTOCOL {
  ///
  /// The revision to which the block IO interface adheres. All future
  /// revisions must be backwards compatible. If a future version is not
  /// back wards compatible, it is not the same GUID.
  ///
  UINT64              Revision;
  ///
  /// Pointer to the EFI_BLOCK_IO_MEDIA data for this device.
  ///
  EFI_BLOCK_IO_MEDIA  *Media;

  EFI_BLOCK_RESET     Reset;
  EFI_BLOCK_READ      ReadBlocks;
  EFI_BLOCK_WRITE     WriteBlocks;
  EFI_BLOCK_FLUSH     FlushBlocks;

};

The _EFI_BLOCK_IO_PROTOCOL struct contains 4 function pointer members.

Suppose you have a variable struct _EFI_BLOCK_IO_PROTOCOL * pStruct, and you want to use the good old * operator to call it's member function pointer. You will end up with code like this:

(*pStruct).ReadBlocks(...arguments...)

But with -> operator, you can write like this:

pStruct->ReadBlocks(...arguments...).

Which looks better?

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Dot is a dereference operator and used to connect the structure variable for a particular record of structure. Eg :

struct student
    {
      int s.no;
      Char name [];
      int age;
    } s1,s2;

main()
    {
      s1.name;
      s2.name;
    }

In such way we can use a dot operator to access the structure variable

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2  
What value does this add? The example is a bit poor compared to the other answers which actually compare it against ->. Also this question has been answered for 4.5 years already. – EWit Oct 8 '14 at 16:15

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