Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm writing to a text file using the following declaration:

void create_out_file(char file_name[],long double *z1){
    FILE *out;
    int i;

    if((out = fopen(file_name, "w+")) == NULL){
        fprintf(stderr, "***> Open error on output file %s", file_name);
        exit(-1);
    }

    for(i = 0; i < ARRAY_SIZE; i++)
    fprintf(out, "%.16Le\n", z1[i]);
    fclose(out);
}

Where z1 is an long double array of length ARRAY_SIZE. The calling function is:

create_out_file("E:/first67/jz1.txt", z1);

I defined the prototype as:

void create_out_file(char file_name[], long double z1[]);

which I'm putting before "int main" but after the preprocessor directives. My code works fine.

I was thinking of putting the prototype as

void create_out_file(char file_name[],long double *z1). 

Is this correct? *z1 will point to the first array element of z1.

Is my declaration and prototype good programming practice?

Thanks a lot...

Update: To make the program general, I defined ARRAY_SiZE as:

const int ARRAY_SIZE = 11;

The prototype becomes:

void create_out_file(const char *file_name, const long double *z1, size_t z_size)

the called function is:

create_out_file("/tmp/myname", z1, ARRAY_SIZE);

and in the function declaration I have

void create_out_file(const char *file_name, const long double *z1, size_t z_size)

FILE *out;
int i;
    if((out = fopen(file_name, "w+")) == NULL){
    fprintf(stderr, "***> Open error on output file %s", file_name);
    exit(-1);
    }


for(i = 0; i < z_size; i++)
fprintf(out, "%.16Le\n", z1[i]);
fclose(out);
}

Will this work?

New Update On compilation, for the line

for(i = 0; i < z_size; i++)

in the declaration, I get the warning: : warning C4018: '<' : signed/unsigned mismatch

What's wrong here?

Thanks...

Latest news: It's working fine thanks to Jonathan Leffler

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use 'const char file_name[]' or 'const char *file_name' - you aren't going to change the name in the function.

Likewise, use 'const long double *z1' or 'const long double z1[]'.

The choice between pointer and array notation in a function prototype is largely arbitrary. I almost always use the pointer notation - because ultimately that is what is passed into the function. There are those who argue that if you are going to use the pointer as an array, use the array notation; it is a perfectly reasonable viewpoint - but not the one I use.

Your code is more general if you pass the array size into the function:

void create_out_file(const char *file_name, const long double *z1, size_t z_size)
{
    ...
}

Note that the choice between pointer and array notation is not arbitrary for global variables. There is a lot of difference between these two:

extern char *something;
extern char  anotherthing[];

One says there is a pointer-sized memory location that contains the address of a character string (presumably). The other says that there is a character string somewhere known by the name 'anotherthing', the value of which is a pointer. That may be a bit subtle - but the difference is crucial. The 'pointer == array' isomorphism only applies in function argument lists.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I'm trying to make it general so that I can write different sized arrays to different text files. You added: size_t z_size. Is this just one variable? I need to change ARRAY_SIZE to size_t z_size so that we write to the the correct length? –  yCalleecharan Apr 4 '10 at 17:45
    
@yCalleecharan: size_t is a standard type that is big enough to hold the size of an object defined in several standard headers - <stddef.h>, <stdlib.h>, <stdio.h> to name but 3. If ARRAY_SIZE is a macro, it can be used in the function call if there's a prototype in scope. The compiler will convert it to size_t for you. (You're unlikely to run into trouble even without a prototype, but don't give yourself unnecessary problems.) So yes, z_size (or z1_size) is a single variable of type size_t passed to the function: create_out_file("/tmp/myname", z1, ARRAY_SIZE); –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 4 '10 at 17:52
    
Thanks a lot. Please see my updated post and can you please tell me if I'm understanding you correctly. –  yCalleecharan Apr 4 '10 at 18:03
    
@yCalleecharan: yes, that is what I was suggesting. I've not scrutinized the code, but the extra parameter is present and used in the expected location. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 4 '10 at 18:24
    
Thanks again. I get a warning message though. I put the information up in the post. Can you please take a look at it? –  yCalleecharan Apr 4 '10 at 18:36

declarations: long double z1[] and long double *z1 are completely same.

*z1 will point to the first array element of z1

yes. there is no such entity array in c. There are only pointers and some thin syntax sugar for accessing them [ ].

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the clarifications. –  yCalleecharan Apr 4 '10 at 17:46
    
"There is no such entity array in c". Not true. Most array operations are implemented through array-to-pointer decay - that's true. But to say that all arrays are just pointers is completely incorrect. –  AnT Apr 4 '10 at 18:04
    
@AndreyT - yes, i say it again - there is no such entity array in C. let me explain. i tell that entity is defined if two conditions match - there is special notation for it (there is in C) and there are operations defined. here it is not true. no operation except accessing by index are defined, and that one is translated into pointer operation. there are no arrays - there is a memory and pointers. and some very thin syntax sugar. –  Andrey Apr 4 '10 at 21:20
    
Thanks for the interesting discussions. –  yCalleecharan Apr 4 '10 at 21:24
    
@Andrey: Incorrect. In C language there are at least 3 contexts/operations where array retains it "arrayness", i.e. it does not decay to a pointer. These operations are: 1) sizeof, 2) initialization of char[] array with a string literal, 3) application of the unary & operator to an array. The last one - the & operator - is probably the most important one, which makes it especially obvious that array is a separate type, not equivalent to a pointer. Another context, which can be mentioned as number 4, is multidimensional arrays. As you probably know, 2D array is not an array of pointers. –  AnT Apr 5 '10 at 1:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.