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I have a Panel that contains child controls.

If i handling the Panel's MouseEnter and MouseLeave events, and his child's MouseEnter and MouseLeave events, here is the order of raising:

Panel.MouseEnter
Panel.MouseLeave
Child1.MouseEnter
Child1.MouseLeave
Panel.MouseEnter
Panel.MouseLeave

but i need the following order of raising:

Panel.MouseEnter
Child1.MouseEnter
Child1.MouseLeave
Panel.MouseLeave

Is that possible?

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7 Answers 7

If you dont mind creating a usercontrol(derived from the panel or other parent container you wish), Override your parent's OnMouseLeave method to look like the following..

protected override void OnMouseLeave(EventArgs e)
{

    if(this.ClientRectangle.Contains(this.PointToClient(Control.MousePosition)))
         return;
    else
    {
        base.OnMouseLeave(e);
    }
}

Then, the event raising will be in the required order.

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This is it... thanx! :D –  Cipi Mar 14 '11 at 8:51
    
Thanks and +1 that gives the idea of the way which i was think on : detect if Mouse pos in child MenuDropdown or not –  sihirbazzz Dec 5 '12 at 15:46
1  
Good idea. But if the contained Control is on the border it won't work. (Give credit below to the user who noticed it.) –  ispiro Dec 28 '13 at 22:10

The mouse is "leaving" the panel as it enters the child control which is why it fires the event.

You could add something along the following lines in the panel MouseLeave event handler:

// Check if really leaving the panel
if (Cursor.Position.X < Location.X ||
    Cursor.Position.Y < Location.Y ||
    Cursor.Position.X > Location.X + Width - 1 ||
    Cursor.Position.Y > Location.Y + Height - 1)
{
    // Do the panel mouse leave code
}
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1  
Thanks, tried it out, but it has bug: there is race condition because the Cursor.Position is the current position, and not exactly the position when the mouse left the control. –  DxCK Apr 4 '10 at 22:23

The solution is to track the number of enters/leaves. In you overall control add a counter:

private int mouseEnterCount = 0;

In the MouseEnter handler do this:

if (++mouseEnterCount == 1)
{
   // do whatever needs to be done when it first enters the control.
}

In the MouseLeave handler do this:

if (--mouseEnterCount == 0)
{
   // do whatever needs to be done when it finally leaves the control.
}

and do the above MouseEnter and MouseLeave event handlers for ALL the child controls as well as the containing object.

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Works for me; thanks. –  Yuki Izumi Sep 12 '14 at 2:50

Matthew's answer will not work always. Especially if the child control is set to the edge of its container and the mouse moves off the controls in that direction. You will never detect the MouseLeave event.

The best approach is to create a user control container then hook all the child controls' MouseEnter and MouseLeave events so that you can properly detect when and where the mouse is at all times. THEN if it enters your container's bounds you can fire a custom MouseEnter event and when it leaves MouseLeave event.

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This may not be the most elegant solution, but you could set a property in the parent control panel (subclass panel) that is a bool value like "bool selected". Then when the MouseEnter for the panel fires set it to true...then stop the mouseleave logic from firing unless it is set to false.

example

bool selected;

MouseEnter(..,..)
{
 if (!selected)
   selected = true;
 else
   selected = false;

  if (selected)
   /.. Logic Here ../
}

MouseLeave()
{
  if (selected)
   return;

/.. Logic Here ../
}

In reality I would just have the MouseLeave event of the child set the parameter.

Example:

Parent:
  bool doLeave;

  MouseLeave(..,..)
  {
    if (doLeave)
    {
     /.. Logic ../
     doLeave = false;
  }

Child:
 MouseLeave(..., ...)
  {
    DerivedPanel parent = this.Parent as DerivedPanel;
    if (parent != null)
      parent.doLeave = true;
  }

Neither are elegant but it will work.

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I believe so. A nice tool to have for verifying your WinForms application's events.

Windows.Forms Order of Events

http://missico.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!7178D2C79BA0A7E3!186.entry

  • Created with EventSpy written by Urs Eichmann. (ftp://missico.net/EventSpy.zip)
  • Using .NET Framework 3.5 and with Visual Basic’s Application Framework enabled.
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This is a tricky one, and will be difficult to code reliably for. One idea is to "capture" the 3 incoming events in a list and execute your desired code once the list is complete (has the 3 desired events in the list). Then when you're done executing whatever code (or perhaps capture the combo of events in reverse), you could empty your list and have it ready for the next time that particular combo-event happens. Not ideal, but just a thought.

Of course, that doesn't overcome the potential resolution issues & possible missed events Hans raised. Perhaps more context is in order.

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