Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

The usual pattern for a singleton class is something like

static Foo &getInst()
{
  static Foo *inst = NULL;
  if(inst == NULL)
    inst = new Foo(...);
  return *inst;    
}

However, it's my understanding that this solution is not thread-safe, since 1) Foo's constructor might be called more than once (which may or may not matter) and 2) inst may not be fully constructed before it is returned to a different thread.

One solution is to wrap a mutex around the whole method, but then I'm paying for synchronization overhead long after I actually need it. An alternative is something like

static Foo &getInst()
{
  static Foo *inst = NULL;
  if(inst == NULL)
  {
    pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex);
    if(inst == NULL)
      inst = new Foo(...);
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
  }
  return *inst;    
}

Is this the right way to do it, or are there any pitfalls I should be aware of? For instance, are there any static initialization order problems that might occur, i.e. is inst always guaranteed to be NULL the first time getInst is called?

share|improve this question
    
Been asked many times before. – anon Apr 4 '10 at 21:55
4  
But you don't have time to find an example and tee up a close vote? I'm fresh out at the moment. – bmargulies Apr 4 '10 at 22:00
    
possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/6915/… – kennytm Apr 4 '10 at 22:04
3  
@bmargulies No, the questioner obviously couldn't be bothered, so why should I? I've decided to give up downvoting and closing as dupes, as I seem to be one of the few bothering to keep crap out of SO. And do you know, laziness feels good! – anon Apr 4 '10 at 23:00
1  
@sbi: so did I. Scattering answers throughout thousands of question is the best way to make it hard to search through them later on. – Matthieu M. Apr 5 '10 at 12:01
up vote 24 down vote accepted

Your solution is called 'double checked locking' and the way you've written it is not threadsafe.

This Meyers/Alexandrescu paper explains why - but that paper is also widely misunderstood. It started the 'double checked locking is unsafe in C++' meme - but its actual conclusion is that double checked locking in C++ can be implemented safely, it just requires the use of memory barriers in a non-obvious place.

The paper contains pseudocode demonstrating how to use memory barriers to safely implement the DLCP, so it shouldn't be difficult for you to correct your implementation.

share|improve this answer
1  
A very interesting paper; thanks for the link. – user168715 Apr 4 '10 at 23:44
    
if(inst == NULL) { temp = new Foo(...); inst=temp;} Doesn't that guarantee that the constructor finished before inst was assigned? I realize it can (and probably will be) optimized away, but logically that solves the problem, no? – stu Mar 24 '15 at 22:17
    
That doesn't help because a compliant compiler is free to reorder the assignment and construction steps as it sees fit. – Joe Gauterin Mar 24 '15 at 22:38
    
I read the paper carefully, and it seems that the recommendation is simply avoid DLCP with Singleton. You will have to volatile the heck out of the class, and add memory barriers (wouldn't that affect efficiency as well?). For practical needs, use a simple, single lock, and cache the object you get from "GetInstance". – gMorphus Apr 24 '15 at 18:15

If you are using C++11, here is a right way to do this:

Foo& getInst()
{
    static Foo inst(...);
    return inst;
}

According to new standard there is no need to care about this problem any more. Object initialization will be made only by one thread, other threads will wait till it complete. Or you can use std::call_once. (more info here)

share|improve this answer
1  
This is the C++11 solution I would expect people to implement. – Alex Nov 11 '13 at 13:59
6  
Sadly, this is not thread safe in VS2013, see "Magic Statics" here: msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/hh567368.aspx – Chris Drew Aug 6 '14 at 8:29
1  
VS 14 seems to fix this -- blogs.msdn.com/b/vcblog/archive/2014/06/03/… – Sea Coast of Tibet Mar 3 '15 at 17:52

Use pthread_once, which is guaranteed that the initialization function is run once atomically.

(On Mac OS X it uses a spin lock. Don't know the implementation of other platforms.)

share|improve this answer

Herb Sutter talks about the double-checked locking in CppCon 2014.

Below is the code I implemented in C++11 based on that:

class Foo {
public:
    static Foo* Instance();
private:
    Foo() {}
    static atomic<Foo*> pinstance;
    static mutex m_;
};

atomic<Foo*> Foo::pinstance { nullptr };
std::mutex Foo::m_;

Foo* Foo::Instance() {
  if(pinstance == nullptr) {
    lock_guard<mutex> lock(m_);
    if(pinstance == nullptr) {
        pinstance = new Foo();
    }
  }
  return pinstance;
}

you can also check complete program here: http://ideone.com/olvK13

share|improve this answer
1  
Why implement double-checked when you already have C++11? – Etherealone Oct 20 '15 at 16:04
    
@Etherealone what's your suggestion? – qqibrow Oct 22 '15 at 1:19
    
A simple static Foo foo; and return &foo; inside the instance function would be enough; static initialization is thread-safe in C++11. Prefer reference to pointers though. – Etherealone Dec 27 '15 at 10:38

TTBOMK, the only guaranteed thread-safe way to do this without locking would be to initialize all your singletons before you ever start a thread.

share|improve this answer

Your alternative is called "double-checked locking".

There could exist multi-threaded memory models in which it works, but POSIX does not guarantee one

share|improve this answer

ACE singleton implementation uses double-checked locking pattern for thread safety, you can refer to it if you like.

You can find source code here.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.