Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is my code which is doing the conversion from hex to decimal. The hex values are stored in a unsigned char array:

  int liIndex ;
  long hexToDec ;
  unsigned char length[4];

  for (liIndex = 0; liIndex < 4 ; liIndex++)
  {
       length[liIndex]= (unsigned char) *content;
       printf("\n Hex value is %.2x", length[liIndex]);
       content++;
  }
  hexToDec = strtol(length, NULL, 16);

Each array element contains 1 byte of information and I have read 4 bytes. When I execute it, here is the output that I get :

 Hex value is 00
 Hex value is 00
 Hex value is 00
 Hex value is 01
 Chunk length is 0

Can any one please help me understand the error here. Th decimal value should have come out as 1 instead of 0.

Regards, darkie

share|improve this question
1  
Why not simply do hexToDec = strtol(content, NULL, 16); ? –  Steve McKay Apr 4 '10 at 22:35
    
*content is storing all the contents of a PNG file in the code. –  name_masked Apr 4 '10 at 22:37
    
This question doesn't contain the full information needed to solve the problem. –  user181548 Apr 4 '10 at 23:06
1  
it helps to always store your data in binary, instead of storing hex values as ascii codes in an array (also binary, but that's not my point), just store the actual binary in the array. i.e. char c= 0x47; then you can have access to the hex value with printf ("%x", c); and you don't need to worry about this stuff: keep data in binary, change representation with a method which returns a representation, such as printf. remember, all data is binary. it is now apparent to me that this is homework, still, keep in mind what i said –  user132014 Apr 4 '10 at 23:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

My guess from your use of %x is that content is encoding your hexademical number as an array of integers, and not an array of characters. That is, are you representing a 0 digit in content as '\0', or '0'?

strtol only works in the latter case. If content is indeed an array of integers, the following code should do the trick:

hexToDec = 0;
int place = 1;
for(int i=3; i>=0; --i)
{
  hexToDec += place * (unsigned int)*(content+i);
  place *= 16;
}
content += 4;
share|improve this answer
    
content is storing all the contents of the file that I am reading. Can you please help me out using the length array and not manipulating the 'content' variable? –  name_masked Apr 4 '10 at 22:39
    
Well there's not much point reading content into length, and then using length, rather than using content directly. I've modified my code to more closely match with what you're doing. –  user168715 Apr 4 '10 at 22:57
    
thanks a ton .. that works great !!.. –  name_masked Apr 4 '10 at 23:05
    
there seems to be something wrong with this code... it does not interpret the value all the time .. Will try to find out the reason ... Undoing the 'correct answer' !! –  name_masked Apr 5 '10 at 1:06
    
the code returns -ve decimal values resulting in seg fault !! –  name_masked Apr 5 '10 at 1:56

strtol is expecting a zero-terminated string. length[0] == '\0', and thus strtol stops processing right there. It converts things like "0A21", not things like {0,0,0,1} like you have.

What are the contents of content and what are you trying to do, exactly? What you've built seems strange to me on a number of counts.

share|improve this answer
    
*content is actually storing the contents of a PNG file. I am reading the number of bytes based on the PNG file format. So here, the length of a chunk is 4 bytes long and so I am storing the 4 bytes in a char array. Does it seem to be something wrong? –  name_masked Apr 4 '10 at 22:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.