Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For a random event generator I'm writing I need a simple algorithm to generate random ranges.

So, for example:

I may say I want 10 random intervals, between 1/1 and 1/7, with no overlap, in the states (1,2,3) where state 1 events add up to 1 day, state 2 events add up to 2 days and state 3 events add up to the rest.

Or in code:

struct Interval
{
    public DateTime Date;
    public long Duration; 
    public int State; 
}

struct StateSummary
{
    public int State;
    public long TotalSeconds; 
}

public Interval[] GetRandomIntervals(DateTime start, DateTime end, StateSummary[] sums, int totalEvents)
{
  // insert your cool algorithm here 
}

I'm working on this now, but in case someone beats me to a solution (or knows of an elegant pre-existing algorithm) I'm posting this on SO.

share|improve this question
    
Do State 1 events always add up to 1 regardless of interval (ditto for state2)? How random do you need? What type of distribution? –  Mitch Wheat Nov 3 '08 at 0:35
    
Correct, in the example state 1 events will always add up to 1 day, state 2 always to 2 days. So its random, but it has caps. I would like stuff to be distributed within a couple standard deviations. –  Sam Saffron Nov 3 '08 at 0:49
    
Standard deviation is going to be practically meaningless with a sample size of 10 spread out over 3 events. –  Bill the Lizard Nov 3 '08 at 4:20
    
Correction, I went with duration between avg duration - avg duration / 2 and avg duration + avg duration / 2 –  Sam Saffron Nov 3 '08 at 5:52

3 Answers 3

First use DateTime.Subtract to determine how many minutes/seconds/whatever between your min and max dates. Then use Math.Random to get a random number of minutes/seconds/whatever in that range. Then use the result of that to construct another TimeSpan instance and add that to your min DateTime.

share|improve this answer
    
Code examples tend to get more votes ;) –  Mitch Wheat Nov 3 '08 at 0:41

Here's an implementation that compiles and works, although it's still somewhat rough. It requires that the input state array properly account for the entire time range of interest (end - start), but it would be trivial to add a bit of code that would make the final state fill up the time not accounted for in the first N-1 states. I also modified your structure definitions to use ints instead of longs for the durations, just to simplify things a bit.

For clarity (and laziness) I omitted all error checking. It works fine for the inputs like the ones you described, but it's by no means bulletproof.

public static Interval[] GetRandomIntervals( DateTime start, DateTime end,
    StateSummary[] states, int totalIntervals )
{
    Random r = new Random();

    // stores the number of intervals to generate for each state
    int[] intervalCounts = new int[states.Length];

    int intervalsTemp = totalIntervals;

    // assign at least one interval for each of the states
    for( int i = 0; i < states.Length; i++ )
        intervalCounts[i] = 1;
    intervalsTemp -= states.Length;

    // assign remaining intervals randomly to the various states
    while( intervalsTemp > 0 )
    {
        int iState = r.Next( states.Length );
        intervalCounts[iState] += 1;
        intervalsTemp -= 1;
    }

    // make a scratch copy of the state array
    StateSummary[] statesTemp = (StateSummary[])states.Clone();

    List<Interval> result = new List<Interval>();
    DateTime next = start;
    while( result.Count < totalIntervals )
    {
        // figure out which state this interval will go in (this could
        // be made more efficient, but it works just fine)
        int iState = r.Next( states.Length );
        if( intervalCounts[iState] < 1 )
            continue;
        intervalCounts[iState] -= 1;

        // determine how long the interval should be
        int length;
        if( intervalCounts[iState] == 0 )
        {
            // last one for this state, use up all remaining time
            length = statesTemp[iState].TotalSeconds;
        }
        else
        {
            // use up at least one second of the remaining time, but
            // leave some time for the remaining intervals
            int maxLength = statesTemp[iState].TotalSeconds -
                intervalCounts[iState];
            length = r.Next( 1, maxLength + 1 );
        }

        // keep track of how much time is left to assign for this state
        statesTemp[iState].TotalSeconds -= length;

        // add a new interval
        Interval interval = new Interval();
        interval.State = states[iState].State;
        interval.Date = next;
        interval.Duration = length;
        result.Add( interval );

        // update the start time for the next interval
        next += new TimeSpan( 0, 0, length );
    }

    return result.ToArray();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think my algorithm distributes the events a little more evenly ... also the order of the first n events is guaranteed in the algorithm which is a little undesirable. This algorithm is a bit faster than mine cause it does not iterate through the return val multiple times. –  Sam Saffron Nov 3 '08 at 6:01
    
I might be missing something, but I don't think the order of the first N events is fixed here. It certainly didn't appear to be so in my tests. –  Charlie Nov 3 '08 at 15:55
    
You are right, i think I miss-read the algorithm, Still I think the comment about the distribution of events is valid. I should test that. –  Sam Saffron Nov 3 '08 at 21:13
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is my current implementation that seems to work ok and accounts for all time. This would be so much cleaner if I didn't have to target .net 1.1

public class Interval
{
    public Interval(int state)
    {
    	this.State = state;
    	this.Duration = -1; 
    	this.Date = DateTime.MinValue;
    }
    public DateTime Date;
    public long Duration; 
    public int State; 
}

class StateSummary
{
    public StateSummary(StateEnum state, long totalSeconds)
    {	
    	State = (int)state;
    	TotalSeconds = totalSeconds;
    }
    public int State;
    public long TotalSeconds; 
}

Interval[] GetRandomIntervals(DateTime start, DateTime end, StateSummary[] sums, int totalEvents)
{
    Random r = new Random(); 
    ArrayList intervals = new ArrayList();

    for (int i=0; i < sums.Length; i++)
    {
    	intervals.Add(new Interval(sums[i].State));
    }

    for (int i=0; i < totalEvents - sums.Length; i++)
    {
    	intervals.Add(new Interval(sums[r.Next(0,sums.Length)].State));
    }

    Hashtable eventCounts = new Hashtable();
    foreach (Interval interval in intervals)
    {
    	if (eventCounts[interval.State] == null) 
    	{
    		eventCounts[interval.State] = 1; 
    	}
    	else 
    	{
    		eventCounts[interval.State] = ((int)eventCounts[interval.State]) + 1;
    	}
    }

    foreach(StateSummary sum in sums)
    {
    	long avgDuration = sum.TotalSeconds / (int)eventCounts[sum.State];
    	foreach (Interval interval in intervals) 
    	{
    		if (interval.State == sum.State)
    		{
    			long offset = ((long)(r.NextDouble() * avgDuration)) - (avgDuration / 2); 
    			interval.Duration = avgDuration + offset; 
    		}
    	}
    } 

    // cap the durations. 
    Hashtable eventTotals = new Hashtable();
    foreach (Interval interval in intervals)
    {
    	if (eventTotals[interval.State] == null) 
    	{
    		eventTotals[interval.State] = interval.Duration; 
    	}
    	else 
    	{
    		eventTotals[interval.State] = ((long)eventTotals[interval.State]) + interval.Duration;
    	}
    }

    foreach(StateSummary sum in sums)
    {
    	long diff = sum.TotalSeconds - (long)eventTotals[sum.State];
    	if (diff != 0)
    	{
    		long diffPerInterval = diff / (int)eventCounts[sum.State]; 
    		long mod = diff % (int)eventCounts[sum.State];
    		bool first = true;
    		foreach (Interval interval in intervals) 
    		{
    			if (interval.State == sum.State)
    			{
    				interval.Duration += diffPerInterval;
    				if (first) 
    				{
    					interval.Duration += mod;
    					first = false;
    				}

    			}
    		}
    	}
    }

    Shuffle(intervals);

    DateTime d = start; 
    foreach (Interval interval in intervals) 
    {
    	interval.Date = d; 
    	d = d.AddSeconds(interval.Duration);
    }

    return (Interval[])intervals.ToArray(typeof(Interval));
}

public static ICollection Shuffle(ICollection c)
{
    Random rng = new Random();
    object[] a = new object[c.Count];
    c.CopyTo(a, 0);
    byte[] b = new byte[a.Length];
    rng.NextBytes(b);
    Array.Sort(b, a);
    return new ArrayList(a);
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.