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Having code:

struct B
{
    int* a;
    B(int value):a(new int(value))
    {   }
    B():a(nullptr){}
    B(const B&);
}

B::B(const B& pattern)
{

}

I'm getting err msg:
'Error 1 error C2533: 'B::{ctor}' : constructors not allowed a return type'

Any idea why?
P.S. I'm using VS 2010RC

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12  
ah, the dreaded semi-colon at end of struct/class. –  falstro Apr 5 '10 at 17:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 36 down vote accepted

You're missing a semicolon after your struct definition.


The error is correct, constructors have no return type. Because you're missing a semicolon, that entire struct definition is seen as a return type for a function, as in:

// vvv return type vvv
struct { /* stuff */ } foo(void)
{
}

Add your semicolon:

struct B
{
    int* a;
    B(int value):a(new int(value))
    {   }
    B():a(nullptr){}
    B(const B&);
}; // end class definition

// ah, no return type
B::B(const B& pattern)
{

}
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Thanks. BTW does anyone knows in c++0x there won't be need for that silly semicolon? When you think about this it's somewhat incosistent with other constructs in c++. Or am I missing something? –  There is nothing we can do Apr 5 '10 at 17:00
    
It's kind of a c hangover, the declaration of a struct is the definition of a type, and the declaration of a class looks like a struct. ps VS2010 warns you about this! –  Martin Beckett Apr 5 '10 at 17:03
7  
@Martin: it's not just a "hangover" from C. Something like: class { /* ...*/ } object; is allowed, so the semicolon is needed to tell the compiler it's reached the end of the class definition. –  Jerry Coffin Apr 5 '10 at 17:08

You need a better compiler :-) With g++:

a.cpp:1: error: new types may not be defined in a return type
a.cpp:1: note: (perhaps a semicolon is missing after the definition of 'B')
a.cpp:5: error: return type specification for constructor invalid

The semicolon is needed because it terminates a possible list of instances of the struct:

struct B {
...
} x, y, z;

Creates three instances of B called x, y and z. This is part of C++'s C heritage, and will still be there in C++0x.

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+1 for rationale. :) –  GManNickG Apr 5 '10 at 17:06
    
+1 for answer, -1 for rationale. It is relatively easy to implement(for pros) that if there is nothing after bracket thats the end of the decl. –  There is nothing we can do Apr 5 '10 at 17:08
2  
@atch You are an expert on parsing C++ now? The point is that there is something after the struct - your constructor. –  anon Apr 5 '10 at 17:10
1  
@atch: Have you ever written a compiler? –  GManNickG Apr 5 '10 at 17:10
1  
@GMan can't agree with you, this type of lousy explanaition (and I know this isn't yours or anyone's from this forum, you just quote somebody) reminds me explanation of why we did have have to write template<template<> >(space between). And you don't have to be an expert to feel that something isn't right and should be changed. –  There is nothing we can do Apr 5 '10 at 18:44

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