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Suppose you have these tables:

Table Name: Salesman Fields: S_ID(Primary Key), Name

Table Name: Region_1 Fields: Reg_ID(Primary Key), S_ID(Foreign Key), sales

Table Name: Region_2 Fields: Reg_ID(Primary Key), S_ID(Foreign Key), sales

Table Name: Region_3 Fields: Reg_ID(Primary Key), S_ID(Foreign Key), sales

Table Name: Region_4 Fields: Reg_ID(Primary Key), S_ID(Foreign Key), sales

Query 1: Find out total of sales of each salesman in all the regions.

Query 2: Find out total of sales of a particual salesman in all the regions. (if the first one is solved I think this will be easy. :-) )

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6  
Hmm... I think you should read up on database normalization. Or if the table design is part of the question then perhaps your teacher should. –  Mark Byers Apr 5 '10 at 17:13
1  
What have you tried so far, and what problems are you having? Not going to just do your homework for you. –  Chad Birch Apr 5 '10 at 17:14
1  
What have tried so far, it is good that you mark this as homework, but we are not going to do it for you... –  Adriaan Stander Apr 5 '10 at 17:14
    
Am I understanding you correctly, are you keeping each Region in a separate table? –  arnorhs Apr 5 '10 at 17:15
2  
Holy toledo, he's Homework Boy - surely he just needs to turn on the big spotlight with the mortorboard on to summon Teacher Man? –  amelvin Apr 5 '10 at 17:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Query 1: Find out total of sales of each salesman in all the regions.


Use:

   SELECT s.name,
          COALESCE(SUM(x.sales), 0) 
     FROM SALESMAN s
LEFT JOIN (SELECT r1.s_id,
                  r1.sales
             FROM REGION_1 r1
           UNION ALL
           SELECT r2.s_id,
                  r2.sales
             FROM REGION_2 r2
           UNION ALL
           SELECT r3.s_id,
                  r3.sales
             FROM REGION_3 r3
           UNION ALL
           SELECT r4.s_id,
                  r4.sales
             FROM REGION_4 r4) x ON x.s_id = s.s_id

Query 2: Find out total of sales of a particual salesman in all the regions.


Add the WHERE clause to the query above:

   SELECT s.name,
          COALESCE(SUM(x.sales), 0) 
     FROM SALESMAN s
LEFT JOIN (SELECT r1.s_id,
                  r1.sales
             FROM REGION_1 r1
           UNION ALL
           SELECT r2.s_id,
                  r2.sales
             FROM REGION_2 r2
           UNION ALL
           SELECT r3.s_id,
                  r3.sales
             FROM REGION_3 r3
           UNION ALL
           SELECT r4.s_id,
                  r4.sales
             FROM REGION_4 r4) x ON x.s_id = s.s_id
    WHERE s.s_id = ?

...replace the ? with the salesperson's s_id value.

The Lesson: UNION vs UNION ALL


UNION and UNION ALL will allow you to combine two queries, but they have to have the same data types in the column positions. For example, say query one returns data types in the following order:

  1. Integer
  2. String

Any subsequent query that is union'd to the first has to return the same data types in the same position. Pay special attention to the fact of data types - it doesn't guarantee the data within the column.

The second issue to UNIONs is knowing the difference between UNION and UNION ALL. UNION will remove duplicates if they exist (equivalent to using DISTINCT), which is not desired in the given scenario. UNION ALL will not remove duplicates, and is faster because of this.

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This design seems a little limited, butmight be how the teacher wants to introduce some new concepts, so lets not argue to long on that point.

Read a little on

UNION

UNION is used to combine the result from multiple SELECT statements into a single result set.

And GROUP BY and SUM to group by a specific sales person, and sum the values.

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I agree this is a crappy database design, but if it is homework I guess that is not the part in question. I would consider solving this with a union -- join salesman and all the region tables together, and sum the sales figure.

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Who would give such a stupid homework? –  Your Common Sense Apr 5 '10 at 17:16
    
@Col.Shrapnel, Next question will probably be with normalized tables, so you can see how much easier the query is. –  Marcus Adams Apr 5 '10 at 18:01
    
yeah Its a crappy design I admit but one of my juniors asked me this question for his project. –  AJ. Apr 6 '10 at 9:24

Query 1:

SELECT S.S_ID, S.Name, 
  ((SELECT SUM(R1.sales) FROM Region_1 R1 WHERE S.S_ID = R1.S_ID) +
   (SELECT SUM(R2.sales) FROM Region_2 R2 WHERE S.S_ID = R2.S_ID) +
   (SELECT SUM(R3.sales) FROM Region_3 R3 WHERE S.S_ID = R3.S_ID) +
   (SELECT SUM(R4.sales) FROM Region_4 R4 WHERE S.S_ID = R4.S_ID)) Total
FROM Salesman S

Or:

SELECT S.S_ID, S.Name, (IFNULL(R1.sales, 0) + IFNULL(R2.sales, 0) + IFNULL(R3.sales, 0) + IFNULL(R4.sales, 0)) Total
FROM Salesman S LEFT JOIN Region_1 R1 ON S.S_ID = R1.S_ID
     LEFT JOIN Region_2 R2 ON S.S_ID = R2.S_ID
     LEFT JOIN Region_3 R3 ON S.S_ID = R3.S_ID
     LEFT JOIN Region_4 R4 ON S.S_ID = R4.S_ID;

Or ...

Create a better schema. What would you do if the business expanded to other countries, and all of a sudden you had 200000 regions? : - ).

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That's why a hate sub-selects –  Your Common Sense Apr 5 '10 at 17:17

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