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Does Python support short-circuiting in boolean expressions?

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3  
Sometimes, Wikipedia is also a godd source en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Short-circuit_evaluation ;) –  Felix Kling Apr 5 '10 at 18:24
2  
You could just write a few lines of code and test this yourself. –  Glenn Maynard Apr 5 '10 at 18:25
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@Glenn Maynard: You're right. I could. According to the FAQ, questions should be objective, specific, clear and of interest to other programmers. Also, I should look for existing questions like this before asking. I think this question qualifies. –  Dinah Apr 5 '10 at 18:29
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Related question: Why aren't “and” and “or” operators in Python? –  tzot Apr 18 '10 at 0:34
    
@Dinah have you considered changing the accept to grijesh's answer? It also helps googlers, and I think his answer really deserves it. –  SHernandez Apr 12 at 16:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 87 down vote accepted

Yep, both and and or operators short-circuit -- see the docs.

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25  
So do any and all. –  Paul McGuire Apr 5 '10 at 19:08
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the code return C == c and (not F or F == f or F in f) gives me an error when F == None, but it should short-circuit after "not F" within the parens, right? I also tried explicitly "F == None"... Error -- TypeError: 'in <string>' requires string as left operand, not NoneType –  Kasapo Dec 5 '12 at 15:39
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@Kasapo: I cannot reproduce this, the following returns True for me where F is None: True and (not F or F == 'string' or F in 'string'). You might want to post this as a question with code & tracebacks instead of tagging onto a 2+ year old one :) –  Matthew Trevor Dec 20 '12 at 2:53

Short-circuiting behavior in operator and, or:

One can observe the Python's short-circuiting behavior of and, or operators in my following example:

>>> def fun():
...     print "Yes"
...     return 1
... 
>>> fun()
Yes
1
>>> 1 or fun()    # due to short-circuiting  "yes" not printed
1
>>> 1 and fun()   # fun() called and "yes" printed 
Yes
1
>>> 0 and fun()   # due to short-circuiting  "yes" not printed 
0

Short-circuiting behavior in function: any(), all():

Python's any() and all() functions also support short-circuiting. Consider examples below to understand both.

A fun() simple function that accepts an argument and returns that.

>>> def fun(i):
...     print "yes"
...     return i
... 

The function any() stops executing as soon as it find a true and save executions.

>>> any(fun(i) for i in [1, 2, 3, 4])   # bool(1) = True
yes
True
>>> any(fun(i) for i in [0, 2, 3, 4])   
yes                                    # bool(0) = False
yes                                    # bool(2) = True
True
>>> any(fun(i) for i in [0, 0, 3, 4])
yes
yes
yes
True

The function all() checks all are true and stops executing as soon as false encounters:

>>> all(fun(i) for i in [0, 0, 3, 4])
yes
False
>>> all(fun(i) for i in [1, 0, 3, 4])
yes
yes
False

Short-circuiting behavior in Chained Comparison:

Additionally, in Python comparisons can be chained arbitrarily e.g. x < y <= z is equivalent to x < y and y <= z. And short-circuiting behavior still retained with chained comparison. Check following examples (used fun(i) defined above):

>>> fun(5)            #used this function
yes
5
>>> 5 > 6 > fun(3)    # same as:  5 > 6 and 6 > fun(3)
False                 # 5 > 6 is False so fun() not called and "yes" NOT printed
>>> 5 < 6 > fun(3)    # 5 < 6 is True 
yes                   # fun(3) called and "yes" prined
True
>>> 4 <= 6 > fun(7)   # 4 <= 6 is True  
yes                   # fun(3) called and "yes" prined
False

Edit:
One more interesting point to note :- Logical and, or operators in Python returns operand's value instead of Boolean True, False for example:

In the case of and, if the left-hand side is equivalent to False, the right-hand side is not evaluated, and the left-hand value is returned.

Unlike in other languages e.g. &&, || operators in C that return either 0 or 1.
examples:

>>> 3 and 5    # Second operand evaluated and returned 
5                   
>>> 3  and ()
()
>>> () and 5   # Second operand NOT evaluated as first operand () is  false
()             # so first operand returned 

Note: The following values are considered by the interpreter to mean false:

        False    None    0    ""    ()    []     {}

Similarly or operator return left most value for which bool(value) == True else right most false value (according to short-circuiting behavior), examples:

>>> 2 or 5    # left most operand bool(2) == True
2    
>>> 0 or 5    # bool(0) == False and bool(5) == True
5
>>> 0 or ()
()

So, how is this useful? One example use given in Practical Python By Magnus Lie Hetland:
Let’s say a user is supposed to enter his or her name, but may opt to enter nothing, in which case you want to use the default value '<unknown>'. You could use an if statement, but you could also state things very succinctly:

In [171]: name = raw_input('Enter Name: ') or '<Unkown>'
Enter Name: 

In [172]: name
Out[172]: '<Unkown>'

In other words, if the return value from raw_input is true (not an empty string), it is assigned to name (nothing changes); otherwise, the default '<unknown>' is assigned to name.

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3  
Thank you for a perfect answer. If only Python documentation would look this way. –  Vít Tuček May 9 '14 at 12:19
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Great teaching, thanks! –  SHernandez Apr 12 at 16:03
    
Excellent stuff. –  Siva-Dev-Wizard Apr 24 at 5:47

Yes. Try the following in your python interpreter:

and

>>>False and 3/0
False
>>>True and 3/0
ZeroDivisionError: integer division or modulo by zero

or

>>>True or 3/0
True
>>>False or 3/0
ZeroDivisionError: integer division or modulo by zero
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8  
+1. Division by zero is my favorite way to check for (and demonstrate) short-circuiting; it's quick and easy and there's absolutely no doubt whether or not the expression is evaluated. –  Air May 9 '14 at 18:50
    
@Air it is indeed a quick way, but how would you demonstrate short-circuiting in any() and all() using 'division by zero'. any idea? –  Grijesh Chauhan Apr 15 at 9:22
    
@GrijeshChauhan One possibility: any(map(int.__div__, (1, 1), (1, 0)) and all(map(int.__div__, (0, 0), (1, 0)). (Or use itertools.imap in Python 2.) –  Air Apr 15 at 15:00
    
@Air thanks, though, it is not straight but it is interesting.. thanks –  Grijesh Chauhan Apr 15 at 15:11

protected by Grijesh Chauhan Jul 26 '14 at 19:14

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