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Once again I was in a design review, and encountered the claim that the probability of a particular scenario was "less than the risk of cosmic rays" affecting the program, and it occurred to me that I didn't have the faintest idea what that probability is.

"Since 2-128 is 1 out of 340282366920938463463374607431768211456, I think we're justified in taking our chances here, even if these computations are off by a factor of a few billion... We're way more at risk for cosmic rays to screw us up, I believe."

Is this programmer correct? What is the probability of a cosmic ray hitting a computer and affecting the execution of the program?

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"Winning Lotteries: What is the probability they will affect a program?" –  KennyTM Apr 5 '10 at 20:29
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It depends in part on where the program is being executed and how well it's shielded. On Earth, the cosmic ray flux is much lower than in deep space, or even near Earth orbit. The Hubble Space Telescope, for instance, produces raw images that are riddled with cosmic ray traces. –  Adam Hollidge Apr 5 '10 at 20:30
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Does this mean that from now on, when someone next asks about finally blocks, we'll have to qualify it with "always executes except if the program exits, or if it gets hit with a cosmic ray"? –  skaffman Apr 5 '10 at 20:42
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Working on a prototype particle detector years ago, I programmed it to print "ouch!" every time it was hit by a cosmic ray. Good times... –  Beta Apr 5 '10 at 21:42
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On of the most interesting questions I've read here in a while. A real eye-opener. Count on me to re-open. –  Agnel Kurian Apr 6 '10 at 6:08
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10 Answers

up vote 80 down vote accepted

From Wikipedia:

Studies by IBM in the 1990s suggest that computers typically experience about one cosmic-ray-induced error per 256 megabytes of RAM per month.[15]

This means a probability of 3.7 × 10-9 per byte per month, or 1.4 × 10-15 per byte per second. If your program runs for 1 minute and occupies 20 MB of RAM, then the failure probability would be

                 60 × 20 × 1024²
1 - (1 - 1.4e-15)                = 1.8e-6 a.k.a. "5 nines"

Error checking can help to reduce the aftermath of failure. Also, because of more compact size of chips as commented by Joe, the failure rate could be different from what it was 20 years ago.

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Improved error checking? Back when that study was published, most personal computers had a parity bit on each byte of memory. Now error control circuitry on memory systems is generally found only on server-level machines (as far as I know), and not even on all server machines. However, when there is error circuitry on memory systems today, it's generally ECC instead of just parity. –  Michael Burr Apr 5 '10 at 20:45
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More importantly, the chip feature size for CPUs in 1995 was around 0.35 µm or 350nm. It's now 1/10th that size at 35nm. –  Joe Koberg Apr 5 '10 at 21:02
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Is it possible that instead of reducing risk, decreased size would increase risk since it would take less energy to change the state of each bit? –  Robert Apr 5 '10 at 21:59
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Reduced size definitely increases risk. Hardened processors for space vehicles use very large feature sizes to avoid cosmic ray effects. –  Joe Koberg Apr 5 '10 at 23:27
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Not just cosmic rays, radioactive isotopes in the materials used in the chip are a much bigger problem. Makers go to huge lengths to make sure the silicon, solder, encapsulation etc doesn't contain any alpha or beta emitters. –  Martin Beckett Apr 6 '10 at 3:12
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Apparently, not insignificant. From this New Scientist article, a quote from an Intel patent application:

"Cosmic ray induced computer crashes have occurred and are expected to increase with frequency as devices (for example, transistors) decrease in size in chips. This problem is projected to become a major limiter of computer reliability in the next decade. "

You can read the full patent here.

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Wikipedia cites a study by IBM in the 90s suggesting that "computers typically experience about one cosmic-ray-induced error per 256 megabytes of RAM per month." Unfortunately the citation was to an article in Scientific American, which didn't give any further references. Personally, I find that number to be very high, but perhaps most memory errors induced by cosmic rays don't cause any actual or noticable problems.

On the other hand, people talking about probabilities when it comes to software scenarios typically have no clue what they are talking about.

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The probability of a bit being flipped must be multiplied by the probability of the bit having a noticeable affect on the program. I'm guessing the second probability is a lot lower than you think. –  Mark Ransom Apr 5 '10 at 21:18
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@Mark: Typical computer programs don't have that kind of fault-tolerance built-in. A single-bit error in the program code will more likely than not crash the program, if the broken code is executed. –  Robert Harvey Apr 6 '10 at 3:05
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Yes, but most of the memory contains data, where the flip won't be that visiblp. –  zoul Apr 6 '10 at 5:01
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@Robert Harvey, not only will most of the program be data, but much of the actual program will be executed rarely if ever. Think about how tough it is to get 100% code coverage for testing. Also some instruction changes might be very subtle. Combine all those and the probabilities start getting very low. –  Mark Ransom Apr 6 '10 at 13:51
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@zoul. lol at 'visiblp', but if e=1100101 and p=1110000 then you're the unfortunate victim of 3 bit flips! –  PaulG Apr 8 '10 at 8:47
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Well, cosmic rays apparently caused the electronics in Toyota cars to malfunction, so I would say that the probability is very high :)

Are cosmic rays really causing Toyota woes?

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"Federal regulators are studying whether sudden acceleration in Toyotas is linked to cosmic rays." This is why you should never give federal regulators power over your life. –  Will Apr 5 '10 at 20:33
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I guess the theory here is that cosmic rays are flipping bits in older brains causing them to malfunction and press the wrong pedal. –  Knox Apr 5 '10 at 20:43
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"Apparently"? I'd say that's a wild guess at this point. My own wild guess is that this phenomenon is a result of that old nightmare of embedded systems (actually most complex computer systems) - the race condition. –  Michael Burr Apr 5 '10 at 20:49
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@Knox: Get out your old tinfoil hat, it is useful! –  Roger Pate Apr 6 '10 at 5:31
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It may not be a joke. I've seen some seriously weird stuff like that happen before. Not as rare as most people think. –  Brian Knoblauch Apr 6 '10 at 17:32
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If a program is life-critical (it will kill someone if it fails), it needs to be written in such a way that it will either fail-safe, or recover automatically from such a failure. All other programs, YMMV.

Toyotas are a case in point. Say what you will about a throttle cable, but it is not software.

See also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Therac-25

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Nevermind the software for throttles. The sensors and wiring for the throttles is the weak point. My Mitsubishi throttle position sensor failed into a random number generator... No unintended acceleration, but it sure didn't do anything good for the fuel mixture! –  Brian Knoblauch Apr 6 '10 at 17:31
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@Brian: Good software would have figured out that the data points were discontinuous, and concluded that the data was bad. –  Robert Harvey Apr 6 '10 at 19:19
    
..and then what... Good data is required. Knowing it's bad doesn't help any. Not something you can magically work around. –  Brian Knoblauch Apr 6 '10 at 19:50
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@Brian: Well, for one thing, you can take corrective action based on the knowledge that your data is bad. You can stop accelerating, for instance. –  Robert Harvey Apr 6 '10 at 20:29
    
Yes you can (and should) cheksum data. Best end-to-end. However this only reduces the chances of corruption. Imagine your "is this valid" instruction gets the bit corrupted in memory or CPU register just when you want to branch to the error handler. –  eckes Sep 26 '13 at 2:25
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Memory errors are real, and ECC memory does help. Correctly implemented ECC memory will correct single bit errors and detect double bit errors (halting the system if such an error is detected.) You can see this from how regularly people complain about what seems to be a software problem that is resolved by running Memtest86 and discovering bad memory. Of course a transient failure caused by a cosmic ray is different to a consistently failing piece of memory, but it is relevant to the broader question of how much you should trust your memory to operate correctly.

An analysis based on a 20 MB resident size might be appropriate for trivial applications, but large systems routinely have multiple servers with large main memories.

Interesting link: http://cr.yp.to/hardware/ecc.html

The Corsair link in the page unfortunately seems to be dead.

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With ECC you can correct the 1 bit errors of Cosmic Rays. In order to avoid the 10% of cases where cosmic rays result in 2-bit-errors the ECC cells are typically interleaved over chips so no two cells are next to each other. A cosmic ray event which affects two cells will therefore result in two correctable 1bit errors.

Sun states: (Part No. 816-5053-10 April 2002)

Generally speaking, cosmic ray soft errors occur in DRAM memory at a rate of ~10 to 100 FIT/MB (1 FIT = 1 device fail in 1 billion hours). So a system with 10 GB of memory should show an ECC event every 1,000 to 10,000 hours, and a system with 100 GB would show an event every 100 to 1,000 hours. However, this is a rough estimation that will change as a function of the effects outlined above.

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I once programmed devices which were to fly in space, and then you (supposedly, noone ever showed me any paper about it, but it was said to be common knowledge in the business) could expect cosmic rays to induce errors all the time.

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Above the atmosphere two things happen: 1) the total flux is higher 2) much more of it comes in the form of heavy, very energetic particles (with enough energy to flip a bit packed into a small space). –  dmckee Apr 5 '10 at 21:22
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More often, noise can corrupt data. Checksums are used to combat this on many levels; in a data cable there is typically a parity bit that travels alongside the data. This greatly reduces the probability of corruption. Then on parsing levels, nonsense data is typically ignored, so even if some corruption did get past the parity bit or other checksums, it would in most cases be ignored.

Also, some components are electrically shielded to block out noise (probably not cosmic rays I guess).

But in the end, as the other answerers have said, there is the occasional bit or byte that gets scrambled, and it's left up to chance whether that's a significant byte or not. Best case scenario, a cosmic ray scrambles one of the empty bits and has absolutely no effect, or crashes the computer (this is a good thing, because the computer is kept from doing harm); but worst case, well, I'm sure you can imagine.

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You might want to have a look at Fault Tolerant hardware as well.

For example Stratus Technology builds Wintel servers called ftServer which had 2 or 3 "mainboards" in lock-step, comparing the result of the computations. (this is also done in space vehicles sometimes).

The Stratus servers evolved from custom chipset to lockstep on the backplane.

A very similar (but software) system is the VMWare Fault Tolerance lockstep based on the Hypervisor.

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