Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is the memory space consumed by one object with 100 attributes the same as that of 100 objects, with one attribute each?

How much memory is allocated for an object?
How much additional space is used when adding an attribute?

share|improve this question

9 Answers 9

No, registering an object takes a bit of memory too. 100 objects with 1 attribute will take up more memory.

share|improve this answer

no, 100 small objects needs more information (memory) than one big.

share|improve this answer

Each object has a certain overhead for its associated monitor and type information, as well as the fields themselves. Beyond that, fields can be laid out pretty much however the JVM sees fit (I believe) - but as shown in another answer, at least some JVMs will pack fairly tightly. Consider a class like this:

public class SingleByte
{
    private byte b;
}

vs

public class OneHundredBytes
{
    private byte b00, b01, ..., b99;
}

On a 32-bit JVM, I'd expect 100 instances of SingleByte to take 1200 bytes (8 bytes of overhead + 4 bytes for the field due to padding/alignment). I'd expect one instance of OneHundredBytes to take 108 bytes - the overhead, and then 100 bytes, packed. It can certainly vary by JVM though - one implementation may decide not to pack the fields in OneHundredBytes, leading to it taking 408 bytes (= 8 bytes overhead + 4 * 100 aligned/padded bytes). On a 64 bit JVM the overhead may well be bigger too (not sure).

EDIT: See the comment below; apparently HotSpot pads to 8 byte boundaries instead of 32, so each instance of SingleByte would take 16 bytes.

Either way, the "single large object" will be at least as efficient as multiple small objects - for simple cases like this.

share|improve this answer
6  
Actually, one instance of SingleByte would take 16 bytes on a Sun JVM, that is 8 bytes overhead, 4 bytes for the field, and then 4 bytes for object padding, since the HotSpot compiler rounds everything to multiples of 8. –  Paul Wagland Jan 24 '11 at 1:26
    
@Paul: Thanks, will update. –  Jon Skeet Jan 24 '11 at 6:22

According to JavaWorld

A plain Object takes 8 bytes;

So 'no' is the answer.

Note: In addition, JDK 1.5 has added an Instrumentation interface, which includes [a getObjectSize() method.

Mindprod summarizes the different sizes, which does not change between 32 and 64bits OS, except for object references. Some 64-bits JVM can compressed their object references in order to avoid the overhead when run on 32-bits platform.

A JVM is free to store data any way it pleases internally, big or little endian, with any amount of padding or overhead, though primitives must behave as if they had the official sizes.
For example, the JVM or native compiler might decide to store a boolean[] in 64-bit long chunks like a BitSet. It does not have to tell you, so long as the program gives the same answers.

  • It might allocate some temporary Objects on the stack.
  • It may optimize some variables or method calls totally out of existence replacing them with constants.
  • It might version methods or loops, i.e. compile two versions of a method, each optimized for a certain situation, then decide up front which one to call.

Then of course the hardware and OS have multilayer caches, on chip-cache, SRAM cache, DRAM cache, ordinary RAM working set and backing store on disk. Your data may be duplicated at every cache level. All this complexity means you can only very roughly predict RAM consumption.


The JavaWorld article gives a little more detail about storage overhead depending on the container used:

For instance, Wrappers can be costly too compared to primitive type for attributes:

Integer: The 16-byte result is a little worse than I expected because an int value can fit into just 4 extra bytes. Using an Integer costs me a 300 percent memory overhead compared to when I can store the value as a primitive type

Long: 16 bytes also: Clearly, actual object size on the heap is subject to low-level memory alignment done by a particular JVM implementation for a particular CPU type. It looks like a Long is 8 bytes of Object overhead, plus 8 bytes more for the actual long value. In contrast, Integer had an unused 4-byte hole, most likely because the JVM I use forces object alignment on an 8-byte word boundary.

Other containers are costly too:

Multidimensional arrays: it offers another surprise.
Developers commonly employ constructs like int[dim1][dim2] in numerical and scientific computing.
In an int[dim1][dim2] array instance, every nested int[dim2] array is an Object in its own right. Each adds the usual 16-byte array overhead. When I don't need a triangular or ragged array, that represents pure overhead. The impact grows when array dimensions greatly differ.
For example, a int[128][2] instance takes 3,600 bytes. Compared to the 1,040 bytes an int[256] instance uses (which has the same capacity), 3,600 bytes represent a 246 percent overhead. In the extreme case of byte[256][1], the overhead factor is almost 19! Compare that to the C/C++ situation in which the same syntax does not add any storage overhead.

String: a String's memory growth tracks its internal char array's growth. However, the String class adds another 24 bytes of overhead.
For a nonempty String of size 10 characters or less, the added overhead cost relative to useful payload (2 bytes for each char plus 4 bytes for the length), ranges from 100 to 400 percent.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Jon, those square brackets are tricky ;) –  VonC Nov 3 '08 at 8:50
    
int[128][6]: 128 arrays of 6 ints - 768 ints in total, 3072 bytes of data + 2064 bytes Object overhead = 5166 bytes total. int[256]: 256 ints in total - therefore non-comparable. int[768]: 3072 bytes of data + 16 byes overhead - about 3/5th of the space of the 2D array - not quite 246% overhead! –  JeeBee Apr 7 '09 at 16:07
    
Ah, the original article used int[128][2] not int[128][6] - wonder how that got changed. Also shows that extreme examples can tell a different story. –  JeeBee Apr 7 '09 at 16:09
    
@Jeebee: I have fixed the typos. int[128][2] became int[128][6] because of a bug in the Javascript editor: the links are referenced with [aTest][x] and the editor assumed [128][2] to be an link address! It did "re-order" the indexes of those links, changing the [2] into [6]... tricky! –  VonC Apr 7 '09 at 17:02
2  
The overhead is 16 bytes in 64bit JVM's. –  Tim Cooper Apr 12 '13 at 13:00

I've gotten very good results from the java.lang.instrument.Instrumentation approach mentioned in another answer. For good examples of its use, see the entry, Instrumentation Memory Counter from the JavaSpecialists' Newsletter and the java.sizeOf library on SourceForge.

share|improve this answer

The rules about how much memory is consumed depend on the JVM implementation and the CPU architecture (32 bit versus 64 bit for example).

For the detailed rules for the SUN JVM check my old blog

Regards, Markus

share|improve this answer
    
I am pretty sure Sun Java 1.6 64bit, need 12 bytes for a plain object + 4 padding = 16; an Object + one integer field = 12 + 4 = 16 –  AlexWien Jul 16 at 19:18

In case it's useful to anyone, you can download from my web site a small Java agent for querying the memory usage of an object. It'll let you query "deep" memory usage as well.

share|improve this answer

The total used / free memory of an program can be obtained in the program via

java.lang.Runtime.getRuntime();

The runtime has several method which relates to the memory. The following coding example demonstrate its usage.

package test;

 import java.util.ArrayList;
 import java.util.List;

 public class PerformanceTest {
     private static final long MEGABYTE = 1024L * 1024L;

     public static long bytesToMegabytes(long bytes) {
         return bytes / MEGABYTE;
     }

     public static void main(String[] args) {
         // I assume you will know how to create a object Person yourself...
         List < Person > list = new ArrayList < Person > ();
         for (int i = 0; i <= 100000; i++) {
             list.add(new Person("Jim", "Knopf"));
         }
         // Get the Java runtime
         Runtime runtime = Runtime.getRuntime();
         // Run the garbage collector
         runtime.gc();
         // Calculate the used memory
         long memory = runtime.totalMemory() - runtime.freeMemory();
         System.out.println("Used memory is bytes: " + memory);
         System.out.println("Used memory is megabytes: " + bytesToMegabytes(memory));
     }
 }
share|improve this answer

The question will be a very broad one.

It depends on the class variable or you may call as states memory usage in java.

It also has some additional memory requirement for headers and referencing.

The heap memory used by a Java object includes

  • memory for primitive fields, according to their size (see below for Sizes of primitive types);

  • memory for reference fields (4 bytes each);

  • an object header, consisting of a few bytes of "housekeeping" information;

Objects in java also requires some "housekeeping" information, such as recording an object's class, ID and status flags such as whether the object is currently reachable, currently synchronization-locked etc.

Java object header size varies on 32 and 64 bit jvm.

Although these are the main memory consumers jvm also requires additional fields sometimes like for alignment of the code e.t.c.

Sizes of primitive types

boolean & byte -- 1

char & short -- 2

int & float -- 4

long & double -- 8

share|improve this answer
    
Readers may also find this paper very illuminating: cs.virginia.edu/kim/publicity/pldi09tutorials/… –  quellish Jan 16 at 1:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.