Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two Python functions, both of which take variable arguments in their function definitions. To give a simple example:

def func1(*args):
    for arg in args:
        print arg

def func2(*args):
    return [2 * arg for arg in args]

I'd like to compose them -- as in func1(func2(3, 4, 5)) -- but I don't want args in func1 to be ([6, 7, 8],), I want it to be (6, 7, 8), as if it was called as func1(6, 7, 8) rather than func1([6, 7, 8]).

Normally, I would just use func1(*func2(3, 4, 5)) or have func1 check to see if args[0] was a list. Unfortunately, I can't use the first solution in this particular instance and to apply the second would require doing such a check in many places (there are a lot of functions in the role of func1).

Does anybody have an idea how to do this? I imagine some sort of introspection could be used, but I could be wrong.

share|improve this question
7  
"I can't use the first solution in this particular instance" Why not? –  interjay Apr 5 '10 at 21:16
    
I'm using a parser that calls Python functions but doesn't support unpacking in the grammar. –  exupero Apr 6 '10 at 10:54
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use a Decorator as posted by Yaroslav.

Minimal example:

def unpack_args(func):
    def deco_func(*args):
        if isinstance(args, tuple):
            args = args[0]

        return func(*args)

    return deco_func


def func1(*args):
    return args

def func2(*args):
    return args

@unpack_args
def func3(*args):
    return args

print func1(1,2,3)    # > (1,2,3)
print func2(1,2,3)    # > (1,2,3)
print func1(*func2(1,2,3))    # > (1,2,3)
print func1(func2(1,2,3))    # > ( (1,2,3), )
print func3(func2(1,2,3))   # > (1,2,3)
share|improve this answer
add comment

You can consider writing function decorator that checks if the first argument is a list. Applying decorator to existing functions is a bit simpler than modifying functions.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Normally, I would just use func1(*func2(3, 4, 5)) or have func1 check to see if args[0] was a list. Unfortunately, I can't use the first solution in this particular instance and to apply the second would require doing such a check in many places (there are a lot of functions in the role of func1).

Why can't you use the first solution?

>>> def func1(*args):
    for arg in args:
        print arg

>>> def func2(*args):
    return [2 * arg for arg in args]

>>> func2(3, 4, 5)
[6, 8, 10]
>>> func1(1,2,3)
1
2
3
>>> func1(*func2(3, 4, 5))
6
8
10
>>> 

If that wasn't possible, you could still have used func1(*tuple(func2(3, 4, 5))) (but you don't need to).

share|improve this answer
    
I think that OP has functions returning scalar values, not only tuples or lists. Converting them all to the common standard is too expensive. –  Yaroslav Apr 5 '10 at 22:02
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.