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#!/bin/bash

hello()
{
    SRC=$1
    DEST=$2

    for IP in `cat /opt/ankit/configs/machine.configs` ; do
        echo $SRC | grep '*' > /dev/null
        if test `echo $?` -eq 0 ; then
            for STAR in $SRC ; do
                echo -en "$IP"
                echo -en "\n\t ARG1=$STAR ARG2=$2\n\n"
            done
        else
            echo -en "$IP"
            echo -en "\n\t ARG1=$SRC ARG2=$DEST\n\n"
        fi
    done
}

hello $1 $2

The above is the shell script which I provide source (SRC) & desitnation (DEST) path. It worked fine when I did not put in a SRC path with wild card ''. When I run this shell script and give ''.pdf or '*'as follows:

root@ankit1:~/as_prac# ./test.sh /home/dev/Examples/*.pdf /ankit_test/as

I get the following output:

192.168.1.6
ARG1=/home/dev/Examples/case_Contact.pdf ARG2=/home/dev/Examples/case_howard_county_library.pdf

The DEST is /ankit_test/as but DEST also get manupulated due to '*'. The expected answer is

ARG1=/home/dev/Examples/case_Contact.pdf ARG2=/ankit_test/as

So, if you understand what I am trying to do, please help me out to solve this BUG. I'll be grateful to you.

Thanks in advance!!!

I need to know exactly how I use '*.pdf' in my program one by one without disturbing DEST.

share|improve this question
    
Hey Why one DOWN??? –  Ankit S Nov 3 '08 at 12:02

9 Answers 9

Your script needs more work. Even after escaping the wildcard, you won't get your expected answer. You will get:

ARG1=/home/dev/Examples/*.pdf ARG2=/ankit__test/as

Try the following instead:

for IP in `cat /opt/ankit/configs/machine.configs`
do
    for i in $SRC
    do
    	echo -en "$IP"
        echo -en "\n\t ARG1=$i ARG2=$DEST\n\n"
    done
done

Run it like this:

root@ankit1:~/as_prac# ./test.sh "/home/dev/Examples/*.pdf" /ankit__test/as
share|improve this answer

The shell will expand wildcards unless you escape them, so for example if you have

$ ls
one.pdf two.pdf three.pdf

and run your script as

./test.sh *.pdf /ankit__test/as

it will be the same as

./test.sh one.pdf two.pdf three.pdf /ankit__test/as

which is not what you expect. Doing

./test.sh \*.pdf /ankit__test/as

should work.

share|improve this answer
    
you are right but I want to use all 'one.pdf, two.pdf, three.pdf' one by one. for example i need to copy this all to another location. Then wat is the Solution. Please help me with that. –  Ankit S Nov 3 '08 at 9:51

If you can, change the order of the parameters passed to your shell script as follows:

./test.sh /ankit_test/as /home/dev/Examples/*.pdf

That would make your life a lot easier since the variable part moves to the end of the line. Then, the following script will do what you want:

#!/bin/bash
hello()
{
    SRC=$1
    DEST=$2

    for IP in `cat /opt/ankit/configs/machine.configs` ; do
        echo -en "$IP"
        echo -en "\n\t ARG1=$SRC ARG2=$DEST\n\n"
    done
}

arg2=$1
shift
while [[ "$1" != "" ]] ; do
        hello $1 $arg2
        shift
done
share|improve this answer

You are also missing a final "done" to close your outer for loop.

share|improve this answer

OK, this appears to do what you want:

#!/bin/bash

hello() {

  SRC=$1
  DEST=$2

   while read IP ; do
     for FILE in $SRC; do
       echo -e "$IP"
       echo -e "\tARG1=$FILE ARG2=$DEST\n"
      done
   done < /tmp/machine.configs
 }

 hello "$1" $2
  1. You still need to escape any wildcard characters when you invoke the script
  2. The double quotes are necessary when you invoke the hello function, otherwise the mere fact of evaluating $1 causes the wildcard to be expanded, but we don't want that to happen until $SRC is assigned in the function
share|improve this answer
    
p.s. this version only uses shell builtins, so doesn't need to spawn any child processes to do its work. –  Alnitak Nov 3 '08 at 10:48
    
what was this down-voted for? –  Alnitak Nov 3 '08 at 11:21

Here's what I came up with:

#!/bin/bash

hello()
{
    # DEST will contain the last argument
    eval DEST=\$$#

    while [ $1 != $DEST ]; do
        SRC=$1

        for IP in `cat /opt/ankit/configs/machine.configs`; do
            echo -en "$IP"
            echo -en "\n\t ARG1=$SRC ARG2=$DEST\n\n"
        done

        shift || break
    done
}

hello $*

Instead of passing only two parameters to the hello() function, we'll pass in all the arguments that the script got.

Inside the hello() function, we first assign the final argument to the DEST var. Then we loop through all of the arguments, assigning each one to SRC, and run whatever commands we want using the SRC and DEST arguments. Note that you may want to put quotation marks around $SRC and $DEST in case they contain spaces. We stop looping when SRC is the same as DEST because that means we've hit the final argument (the destination).

share|improve this answer

For multiple input files using a wildcard such as *.txt, I found this to work perfectly, no escaping required. It should work just like a native bash app like "ls" or "rm." This was not documented just about anywhere so since I spent a better part of 3 days trying to figure it out I decided I should post it for future readers.

Directory contains the following files (output of ls)

file1.txt file2.txt file3.txt

Run script like

$ ./script.sh *.txt

Or even like

$ ./script.sh file{1..3}.txt

The script

#!/bin/bash

# store default IFS, we need to temporarily change this
sfi=$IFS

#set IFS to $'\n\' - new line
IFS=$'\n'

if [[ -z $@ ]]
  then
  echo "Error: Missing required argument"
  echo
  exit 1
fi

# Put the file glob into an array
file=("$@")

# Now loop through them
for (( i=0 ; i < ${#file[*]} ; i++ ));
do

  if [ -w ${file[$i]} ]; then
     echo ${file[$i]} "  writable" 
  else
     echo ${file[$i]} " NOT writable"
  fi
done

# Reset IFS to its default value
IFS=$sfi

The output

file1.txt writable
file2.txt writable
file3.txt writable

The key was switching the IFS (Internal Field Separator) temporarily. You have to be sure to store this before switching and then switch it back when you are done with it as demonstrated above.

Now you have a list of expanded files (with spaces escaped) in the file[] array which you can then loop through. I like this solution the best, easiest to program for and easiest for the users.

share|improve this answer

There's no need to spawn a shell to look at the $? variable, you can evaluate it directly.

It should just be:

if [ $? -eq 0 ]; then
share|improve this answer
    
I do not have much exp. in shell scripting. So, don't know this is a bizzare way to use. I tried yours also but got following error. getting this error when using this ./test.sh: line 14: [: missing `]' –  Ankit S Nov 3 '08 at 10:14

You're running

./test.sh /home/dev/Examples/*.pdf /ankit_test/as 

and your interactive shell is expanding the wildcard before the script gets it. You just need to quote the first argument when you launch it, as in

./test.sh "/home/dev/Examples/*.pdf" /ankit_test/as

and then, in your script, quote "$SRC" anywhere where you literally want the things with wildcards (ie, when you do echo $SRC, instead use echo "$SRC") and leave it unquoted when you want the wildcards expanded. Basically, always put quotes around things which might contain shell metacharacters unless you want the metacharacters interpreted. :)

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