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I've got 3 classes

namespace ServerPart
{

    public class Car
    {
    }

    public class SUV:Car
    {
        public string Name {get;set;}    
        public string Color {get;set;)
    }
}

And

namespace WebSericePart
{
    public class Car
    {
    }
}

namespace WebSericePart.Car
{
    public class SUV
    {
        public string Name {get;set;}

        public string Color {get;set;)
    }
}

And I've translator

namespace WebServicepart.Translators
{
    public static class ModelToContract
    {
        public Car[] ToCars(ServerPart.Car[] modelCars)
        {
            List<Car> contractCars=new List<Car>();
            foreach(ServerPart.Car modelCar in modelCars)
            {
                contractCars.Add(ToCar(modelCar);
            }
            return contractCars.ToArray();
        }

        public Car ToCar(ServerPart.Car modelCar)
        {
            if(modelCar is ServerPart.SUV)
            {
                return ToSUV(modelCar);
            }
            else
            {
                throw new NotImplementedException("Not supported type of Car");
            }
        }

        public Car ToSUV(ServerPart.Car modelCar)
        {
            SUV suv = new SUV();

            suv.Name=((ServerPart.SUV)modelCar).Name;
            suv.Color=((ServerPart.SUV)modelCar).Color;

            // ?? Is good practice ?? Or 
            //ServerPart.SUV  suv=(ServerPart.SUV)modelCar
            //suv.Name=suv.Name
            //suv.Color=suv.Color
            // is better ??

            return suv;
        }
    }
}

Do I used some else bad practices ?? Or Everything is OK :) ?

share|improve this question
    
Why does ToSUV not take a ServerPart.SUV as an argument and return an WebServicePart.SUV? Cast it only in the calling code. Then it's clear you aren't going to get cast exceptions except in the calling code where you can see that the cast is inside an if statement testing it. –  Ian Mercer Apr 16 '10 at 18:29
    
You could also look at using Automapper to make it easier to copy values from one object to another if this gets more complex. –  Ian Mercer Apr 16 '10 at 18:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There's nothing wrong with using a property inline with a cast ((Type)object).Property.

I prefer the second method because you're reducing duplicate code. If you add some properties later, you will not have to keep duplicating the cast code.

share|improve this answer

Avoid cast, use a visitor pattern if you can modify ServerPart.

share|improve this answer

I actually prefer the second options. I think it is most readable and better yet, easier to debug. Perhaps you are lacking a null check, but maybe it is not neccesary as it can never happen.

ANYWAY, both are OK, I think.

share|improve this answer

This isn't a casting problem, but in general, returning an array isn't such a good idea in C#:

public Car[] ToCars(ServerPart.Car[] modelCars)

See Eric Lippert's excellent article Array's Considered Somewhat Harmful for the reason why.

This is particularly true since internally, the Car objects are stored in a list. If the method calling ToCars only needs to get a sequence of Cars, you could use IEnumerable<Cars> (see below). Other interfaces can grant the caller other accesses as well - see ICollection<T> and IList<T>.

public IEnumerable<Car> ToCars(IEnumerable<ServerPart.Car> modelCars)
{
  List<Car> contractCars=new List<Car>(); 
  foreach(ServerPart.Car modelCar in modelCars) 
  { 
    contractCars.Add(ToCar(modelCar); 
  } 
  return (IEnumerable<Car>)contractCars;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why build a list? yield return ToCar(modelCar) in the loop is all you need. If all they do is .First() on it you've then saved enumerating all of them. –  Ian Mercer Apr 16 '10 at 18:23

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