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I need to write AVL-tree with generic type in C. The best way I know is to use [ void* ] and to write some functions for creating, copying, assignment and destruction. Please, tell me some better way.

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4  
Use C++ or C#? . –  Alex Budovski Apr 6 '10 at 8:44
    
Thanks, I know about C++ and C#. But now I have to write only in C :( –  Ribtoks Apr 6 '10 at 8:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I will give you an example on how you can achieve generics functionality in C. The example is on a linked list, but I am sure you can adapt it on your AVL tree if necessary.

First of all you will need to define a structure for list element. A possible (most simple implementation):

struct list_element_s {
    void *data;
    struct list_element_s *next;

};
typedef struct list_element_s list_element;

Where 'data' will act as the "container" where you are going to keep your information, and 'next' is the reference to the direct linked element. (NOTE: Your binary tree element should include a reference to the right / left children elements).

After you create you element structure, you will need to create your list structure. A good practice is to have some members that are pointing to functions: destructor (needed to free the memory being hold by 'data'), and comparator (to be able to compare two of your list elements).

A list structure implementation could look like this:

struct list_s {
    void (*destructor)(void *data);    
    int (*cmp)(const void *e1, const void *e2);
    unsigned int size;
    list_element *head;
    list_element *tail;

};
typedef struct list_s list;

After you design your data structure, you should design your data structure interface. Let's say our list will have the following, most simple, interface:

nmlist *list_alloc(void (*destructor)(void *data));
int list_free(list *l);
int list_insert_next(list *l, list_element *element, const void *data);
void *list_remove_next(list *l, list_element *element);

Where:

  • list_alloc : will alocate memory for your list.
  • list_free : will free memory allocated for list, and all 'data' being held by list_element(s).
  • list_insert_next : will insert a new element next to 'element' . If 'element' is NULL, the insertion will be made at the head of the list.
  • list_remove_next : will remove & return (void*)'data' being held by 'element->next' . If 'element' is NULL, it will perform "list->head removal".

And now the functions implementation:

list *list_alloc(void (*destructor)(void *data))
{
    list *l = NULL;
    if ((l = calloc(1,sizeof(*l))) != NULL) {
        l->size = 0;
        l->destructor = destructor;
        l->head = NULL;
        l->tail = NULL;
    }
    return l;
}

int list_free(list *l)
{
    void *data;
    if(l == NULL || l->destructor == NULL){
        return (-1);
    }    
    while(l->size>0){    
        if((data = list_remove_next(l, NULL)) != NULL){
            list->destructor(data);
        }
    }
    free(l);
    return (0);
}

int list_insert_next(list *l, list_element *element, const void *data)
{
    list_element *new_e = NULL;
    new_e = calloc(1, sizeof(*new_e));
    if (l == NULL || new_e == NULL) {
        return (-1);
    }
    new_e->data = (void*) data;
    new_e->next = NULL;
    if (element == NULL) {
        if (l->size == 0) {
            l->tail = new_e;
        }
        new_e->next = l->head;
        l->head = new_e;
    } else {
        if (element->next == NULL) {
            l->tail = new_e;
        }
        new_e->next = element->next;
        element->next = new_e;
    }
    l->size++;
    return (0);
}

void *list_remove_next(list *l, list_element *element)
{
    void *data = NULL;
    list_element *old_e = NULL;
    if (l == NULL || l->size == 0) {
        return NULL;
    }
    if (element == NULL) {
        data = l->head->data;
        old_e = l->head;
        l->head = l->head->next;
        if (l->size == 1) {
            l->tail = NULL;
        }
    } else {
        if (element->next == NULL) {    
            return NULL;    
        }    
        data = element->next->data;
        old_e = element->next;
        element->next = old_e->next;
        if (element->next == NULL) {
            l->tail = element;
        }
    }
    free(old_e);
    l->size--;
    return data;
}

And now, how to use your simple generic linked list implementation. In the following example the list is acting like a stack:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include "nmlist.h"

void simple_free(void *data){
    free(data);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
    list *l = NULL;
    int i, *j;

    l = list_alloc(simple_free);
    for(i = 0; i < 10; i++){
        j = calloc(1, sizeof(*j));
        if(j != NULL){
            *j = i;
            list_insert_next(l, NULL, (void*) j);
        }
    }

    for(i = 0; i < 10; i++){
        j = (int*) list_remove_next(l, NULL);
        if(j != NULL){
            printf("%d \n", *j);
        }
    }

    list_free(l);

    return (0);
}

Note that instead of "int *j" you can use a pointer that references more complex structures. If you do, don't forget to modify your 'list->destructor' function accordingly.

share|improve this answer
    
Uhm... assigning the result of a memory allocation and testing it for NULL within the same if(), without any need, as you do in list_alloc I consider as bad style, but assigning it and dereferencing it in the same expression without any check for NULL is such a major WTF that I have to add -1 to your post. –  Secure Apr 6 '10 at 10:18
    
Can you please be more specific ? Any suggestions on how to re-write list_alloc ? –  Andrei Ciobanu Apr 6 '10 at 10:25
    
l = calloc(1,sizeof(*l)); if (l != NULL) ... –  Secure Apr 6 '10 at 10:38
    
I've modified main(). I don't consider memory allocation and testing for NULL a bad style, still I am not a professional C programmer and I might be wrong. –  Andrei Ciobanu Apr 6 '10 at 10:50
    
In main(), l should be checked for NULL after calling list_alloc() –  Tim Post Apr 6 '10 at 11:10

What Alex said. In c, void * is what there is.

Assuming you must work in C, though... Why do you need to provide the create/copy/assignment/destruction functions to the library? Which features of this library require the AVL-tree code to use those operations?

The major operations on a search tree are insert, delete and lookup, correct? You will need to provide a comparison function for all of those operations, but you should let the clients of this library handle all of the other operations. Simple is probably better in this case.

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Well, you're right, I also need a comparison function... And yes, I just need to get from users of my strange struct their functions for creation(with default value), copying, deletion and assignment. But in my little project I must provide an example of usage of my data structure (with C-strings). I'm just looking for simplier way... –  Ribtoks Apr 6 '10 at 9:06
    
Why do you need to get those functions from them? Like I'm saying, they aren't necessary for any of the basic tree operations; the more C-like way here would be to only provide the insert/delete/lookup operations on void pointers and let outside code handle their own datatypes. –  Jesse Millikan Apr 6 '10 at 9:35

To do true, performant generics in C, you hack with the preprocessor. This approach has many of the same disadvantages of the C++ template approach; namely that all (most, anyway) code must live in header files, and debugging and testing are a pain. The advantages are also there; that you can get superior performance and let the compiler do all sorts of inlining to speed things up, minimize allocations by reducing indirection, and a modicum of type safety.

The definition looks like (let's imagine we have a hash set)

int my_int_set(int x);
#define HASH_SET_CONTAINED_TYPE int
#define HASH_SET_TYPE my_int_set
#define HASH_SET_FUNC hash_int
#include "hash_set.h"

And then to use it, you simply use the type you created above:

my_int_set x;
my_int_set_init(&x);
my_int_set_add(&x, 7);
if (my_int_set_check(&x, 7)) printf("It worked!\n");
...
// or, if you prefer
my_int_set *x = my_int_set_create();

Internally, this is implemented by a whole bunch of token pasting, etc., and (as noted above) is a huge pain to test.

So something like:

#ifndef HASH_SET_CONTAINED_TYPE
    #error Must define HASH_SET_CONTAINED_TYPE
#endif
...  /// more parameter checking

#define HASH_SET_ENTRY_TYPE HASH_SET_TYPE ## _entry
typedef struct HASH_SET_ENTRY_TYPE ## _tag {
    HASH_SET_CONTAINED_TYPE key;
    bool present;
} HASH_SET_ENTRY_TYPE;
typedef struct HASH_SET_TYPE ## _tag {
    HASH_SET_TYPE ## _entry data[];
    size_t elements;
} HASH_SET_TYPE;

void HASH_SET_TYPE ## _add(HASH_SET_CONTAINED_TYPE value) {
    ...
}
...
#undef HASH_SET_CONTAINED_TYPE
...  // remaining uninitialization

You can even add options; like #define HASH_SET_VALUE_TYPE or #define HASH_SET_DEBUG.

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1  
For "superior performance" and "to speed things up"... Looking at it alone is enough to really understand why premature optimization is the root of all evil. –  Secure Apr 7 '10 at 6:34
    
gaining type safety is probably a much bigger benefit. –  Roman A. Taycher Jun 22 '11 at 8:34

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