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I am no newb on OO programming, but I am faced with a puzzling situation. I have been given a program to work on and extend, but the previous developers didn't seem that comfortable with OO, it seems they either had a C background or an unclear understanding of OO. Now, I don't suggest I am a better developer, I just think that I can spot some common OO errors. The difficult task is how to amend them.

In my case, I see a lot of this:

        if (ret == 1) {
            out.print("yadda yadda");
        } else if (ret == 2) {
            out.print("yadda yadda");
        } else if (ret == 3) {
            out.print("yadda yadda");
        } else if (ret == 0) {
            out.print("yadda yadda");
        } else if (ret == 5) {
            out.print("yadda yadda");
        } else if (ret == 6) {
            out.print("yadda yadda");
        } else if (ret == 7) {
            out.print("yadda yadda");
        }

ret is a value returned by a function, in which all Exceptions are swallowed, and in the catch blocks, the above values are returned explicitly. Oftentimes, the Exceptions are simply swallowed, with empty catch blocks.

It's obvious that swalllowing exceptions is wrong OO design. My question concerns the use of return values. I believe that too is wrong, however I think that using Exceptions for control flow is equally wrong, and I can't think of anything to replace the above in a correct, OO manner.

Your input, please?

share|improve this question
    
@FrontierPsycho: silently swallowing exception is bad but it has nothing to do with OO. Actually exceptions have nothing to do with OO: exceptions do not exist at the OOA/OOD level. Exceptions are (some) languages idiosynchrasies. Apples/Oranges. And if there's anything "exceptional" that hasn't been taken into account in your OO-analysis/OO-design then your OOA/OOD is broken. –  SyntaxT3rr0r Apr 6 '10 at 9:13
    
Thanks, I hadn't thought of Exceptions as separate from OO. Unfortunately, the analysis and design of the application was done by other people a long time and many lines of code ago, and changing it from scratch is a pain. I am merely trying to correct the most obvious faults and the things that are easier to correct. –  FrontierPsycho Apr 6 '10 at 9:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

But this is Java (not C++). So if you work with `codes' like that you ought to work with Enums. And using Enums (or integers, incidentally) you can use the switch() statement to improve code like that a lot.

public abstract class Example {

    protected abstract ErrorCode test();

    public void run() {
       ErrorCode code=test();
       switch(code) {
           case OK: 
               System.out.println("All ok"); 
           break;
           case OOPS: 
               System.out.println("Oops, an error occurred.");
           break;
           case OTHER_ERROR: 
               System.out.println("A different error occurred");
           break;
           case UNKNOWN_ERROR: 
               System.out.println("Yet another, unknown error occurred.");
           break;
       }
    }

    public static enum ErrorCode {
        OK, OOPS, OTHER_ERROR, UNKNOWN_ERROR;
    }
}

This can be extended to give it some more Continuation Passing Style flavour; by defining a callback method for ErrorCode and calling that method instead of doing the switch() statement.

share|improve this answer
    
This looks nice and clean, and lets me avoid defining custom exceptions (although it's a version of the return value method). –  FrontierPsycho Apr 6 '10 at 10:10

These are IMHO two completely different things:

OO-vs.-non-OO design

and

exception-based-vs.-return-value-based design.

You can combine them in any way (although most developers would say that a non-OO design is only good for special tasks like algorithms.

With regard to your code base: I would recommend a holistic analysis of the whole software, and then some careful thinking whether doing away with the return codes is a good idea. Will the software be expanded in the future? Or is it just some dead wood lying somewhere to do one specific task?

I would recommend reading up on "refactoring" and "legacy code". People around me say "Working Effectively with Legacy Code" by Michael Feathers is a very solid and recommended book. So this could help you a lot.

Good luck!

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Of course using exceptions for control flow is not the right thing to do. They need to be handled separated from your actual program control flow.

The fact that an exception occurred means that there was an exceptional event in you application and swallowing it or turn it into a return value doesn't change that (meaning that as soon as you turned it into a return value you kind of used it for the control flow). Usually it is possible to avoid return values that indicate both success states and exceptional states (first step: by using enums and then gradually improving the OO design).

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According to if-else approach, I'll bring just a hint if you'd like to go more OO here. You definitely could use state pattern.

Class State{
   public:
       virtual void showInfo()=0;

}

class Iddle:public State{
    public:
       void showInfo(){
        std.cout<<"I've just initialized"<<std.endl;
        };

}

class Wrong:public State{

   public:
       void showInfo(){
        std.cout<<"Something goes wrong"<<std.endl;
        };

}
main()
{
boost::scoped_ptr<State> mystate = new Iddle();

mystate->showInfo();

.....
mystate.reset(new Wrong());
....
mystate->showInfo();

}

You can implement anything you want in desired states. This way you will throw out if-elses. This is the way your generic "catch" function could set the states. This could be of course used by regular system tasks, so any main component would know what is the state, and what action should be proceeded.

Simplifies:

if you'll have an exception, set a state to Wrong, then kill the thread, stop the action or whatever object responsible for the failure. You'll still have the state, you handled the exception in proper manner, but still have some states, which could be a basis for taking appropriate actions in another thread.

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Generally consensus is that exceptions shouldn't be used for control flow. However, the Python community seems to think differently.

However, I think the fundamental issue that you have is one of clarity; catching exceptions in one method and converting each condition to some arbitrary numeric value make it very unclear what the code is trying to do.

Without seeing the called code that you mention it's difficult to suggest how to improve it. If it is dealing with genuine exceptional conditions then I would consider allowing those to be handled by the calling code and possibly rethrowing as whatever exception fits the purpose of the method.

share|improve this answer
    
To tell you the truth, most of the possible values denote errors. Usually only one denotes that the function executed as expected. I am starting to lean towards using exceptions, although that would mean writing my own exception classes. –  FrontierPsycho Apr 6 '10 at 9:52

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