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Why is super.super.method(); not allowed in Java?

Let's assume I have 3 classes A, B and C, each one extending the previous one.

How do I call the code in A.myMethod() from C.myMethod() if B also implements myMethod?

class A
{
  public void myMethod()
  {
    // some stuff for A
  }
}

class B extends A
{
  public void myMethod()
  {
    // some stuff for B
    //and than calling A stuff
    super.myMethod();
  }
}

class C extends B
{
  public void myMethod()
  {
    // some stuff for C
    // i don't need stuff from b, but i need call stuff from A
    // something like: super.super.myMethod(); ?? how to call A.myMethod(); ??
  }
}
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marked as duplicate by blahdiblah, Peter O., Mudassir, Nimit Dudani, CapDroid Nov 3 '12 at 5:53

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Why would you do that? Can you give an example? –  Macarse Apr 6 '10 at 11:36

3 Answers 3

You can't. This is deliberate.

Class B provides an interface (as in the concept, not the Java keyword) to subclasses. It has elected not to give direct access to the functionality of A.myMethod. If you require B to provide that functionality, then use a different method for it (different name, make it protected). However, it is probably better to "prefer composition over inheritance".

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Thanks guys! i will try to rework my design. –  Arkaha Apr 6 '10 at 11:36
    
Arkaha, see my answer to your question. It is syntactically possible to call a method defined by a superclass that it is not your immediate ancestor (your super). But you need to have a valid reason for doing so. –  luis.espinal Apr 6 '10 at 12:05

You can't, and you shouldn't.

This is a sign of bad design. Either rename a method or include the required common functionality in another method or an utility class.

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1  
Reflection also doesn't provide a way to do this, the normal rules of runtime polymorphism will still apply. You can't even implement super.myMethod() using reflection, let alone the theoretical super.super.myMethod(). –  Joachim Sauer Apr 6 '10 at 11:33
    
correct. updated. –  Bozho Apr 6 '10 at 11:40
    
Not necessarily, you need to do that when you define inner classes (for example, defining action listeners in Swing or call back classes.) Outside of such situations, yes, it is bad design, but by itself it is not. Java syntax supports it anyhow (see my response to Arkaha's question.) –  luis.espinal Apr 6 '10 at 11:50

I'm not sure you can. Java makes all methods virtual by default. This means that the most simple solution will not work: Declare a variable of type A, assign your C instance to it and call myMethod will result in C.myMethod being called.

You could try to reflect type A and invoke its methods directly. It would be interesting to see what happens in this case, but I'd be surprised if the virtual dispatch wouldn't happen...

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