Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In these examples on TopLink JPA Annotation Reference:

Example 1-59 @OneToMany - Customer Class With Generics

@Entity
public class Customer implements Serializable {
    ...
    @OneToMany(cascade=ALL, mappedBy="customer")
    public Set<Order> getOrders() { 
        return orders; 
    }
    ...
}

Example 1-60 @ManyToOne - Order Class With Generics

@Entity
public class Order implements Serializable {
    ...
    @ManyToOne
    @JoinColumn(name="CUST_ID", nullable=false)
    public Customer getCustomer() { 
        return customer; 
    }
    ...
}

It seems to me that the Customer entity is the owner of the association. However, in the explanation for the mappedBy attribute in the same document, it is written that:

if the relationship is bidirectional, then set the mappedBy element on the inverse (non-owning) side of the association to the name of the field or property that owns the relationship as Example 1-60 shows.

However, if I am not wrong, it looks like in the example, the mappedBy is actually specified on the owning side of the association, rather than the non-owning side.

So my question is basically:

  1. In a bidirectional (one-to-many/many-to-one) association, which of the entities is the owner? How can we designate the One side as the owner? How can we designate the Many side as the owner?

  2. What is meant by "the inverse side of the association"? How can we designate the One side as the inverse? How can we designate the Many side as the inverse?

share|improve this question
1  
the link you provided is outdated. Please update. –  MartinL Apr 4 '12 at 19:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 155 down vote accepted

To understand this, you must take a step back. In OO, the customer owns the orders (orders are a list in the customer object). There can't be an order without a customer. So the customer seems to be the owner of the orders.

But in the SQL world, one item will actually contain a pointer to the other. Since there is 1 customer for N orders, each order contains a foreign key to the customer it belongs to. This is the "connection" and this means the order "owns" (or literally contains) the connection (information). This is exactly the opposite from the OO/model world.

This may help to understand:

public class Customer {
     // This field doesn't exist in the database
     // It is simulated with a SQL query
     // "OO speak": Customer owns the orders
     private List<Order> orders;
}

public class Order {
     // This field actually exists in the DB
     // In a purely OO model, we could omit it
     // "DB speak": Order contains a foreign key to customer
     private Customer customer;
}

The inverse side is the OO "owner" of the object, in this case the customer. The customer has no columns in the table to store the orders, so you must tell it where in the order table it can save this data (which happens via mappedBy).

share|improve this answer
21  
Just to clarify: the many side is the owner; the one side is the inverse. You don't have a choice (practically speaking). –  John Apr 6 '10 at 12:11
    
Thanks for the explanation Aaron. Is there a RDBMS/SQL book available that uses the same terminology (i.e. inverse/owner) where I can find more information about this topic? What was strange to me also was that the JPA spec didn't have a detailed definition of what inverse means and what owning means. It was just pointed that the mappedBy attribute must be on the inverse side. –  Behrang Apr 6 '10 at 13:12
6  
No, Hibernate invented this. I don't like it since it exposes part of the implementation to the OO model. I'd prefer a @Parent or @Child annotation instead of "XtoY" to state what the connection means (rather than how it is implemented) –  Aaron Digulla Apr 6 '10 at 13:49
2  
@AaronDigulla everytime I have to go through a OneToMany mappings I came to read this answer, probably the best on the subject on SO. –  Eugene Nov 2 '12 at 7:14
1  
Wow. If only ORM frameworks documentation had such a good explanation - it would make the whole thing easier to swallow! Excellent answer! –  NickJ Sep 27 '13 at 15:57

The entity which has the table with foreign key in the database is the owning entity and the other table, being pointed at, is the inverse entity.

share|improve this answer
11  
even simpler: Owner is the table with the FK Column –  jacktrades Nov 28 '12 at 13:26
    
Simple and good explanation. Any side can be made Owner. If we use mappedBy in Order.java ,on Customer field <Remove mappedby from Customer.java> then a new table will be created something like Order_Customer which will have 2 columns. ORDER_ID and CUSTOMER_ID. –  Manish Aug 10 '13 at 16:08

Unbelievably, in 3 years nobody has answered your excellent question with examples of both ways to map the relationship.

As mentioned by others, the "owner" side contains the pointer (foreign key) in the database. You can designate either side as the owner, however, if you designate the One side as the owner, the relationship will not be bidirectional (the inverse aka "many" side will have no knowledge of its "owner"). This can be desirable for encapsulation/loose coupling:

// "One" Customer owns the associated orders by storing them in a customer_orders join table
public class Customer {
    @OneToMany(cascade = CascadeType.ALL)
    private List<Order> orders;
}

// if the Customer owns the orders using the customer_orders table,
// Order has no knowledge of its Customer
public class Order {
    // @ManyToOne annotation has no "mappedBy" attribute to link bidirectionally
}

The only bidirectional mapping solution is to have the "many" side own its pointer to the "one", and use the @OneToMany "mappedBy" attribute. Without the "mappedBy" attribute Hibernate will expect a double mapping (the database would have both the join column and the join table, which is redundant (usually undesirable)).

// "One" Customer as the inverse side of the relationship
public class Customer {
    @OneToMany(cascade = CascadeType.ALL, mappedBy = "customer")
    private List<Order> orders;
}

// "many" orders each own their pointer to a Customer
public class Order {
    @ManyToOne
    private Customer customer;
}
share|improve this answer
    
In your unidirectional example, JPA expects an extra customer_orders table to exist. With JPA2 you can use the @JoinColumn annotation (which I seem to use often) on the orders field of Customer to denote the database foreign key column in the Order table that should be used. This way you have a unidirectional relation in Java while still having a foreign key column in the Order table. So in the Object world, the Order doesn't know about Customer while in the database world, the Customer doesn't know about Order. –  Henno Vermeulen Oct 4 '13 at 12:13
    
To be uber-complete, you could show the bidirectional case where customer is the owning side of the relationship. –  HDave Mar 17 '14 at 16:39

For two Entity Classes Customer and Order , hibernate will create two tables.

Possible Cases:

  1. mappedBy is not used in Customer.java and Order.java Class then->

    At customer side a new table will be created[name = CUSTOMER_ORDER] which will keep mapping of CUSTOMER_ID and ORDER_ID. These are primary keys of Customer and Order Tables. At Order side an additional column is required to save the corresponding Customer_ID record mapping.

  2. mappedBy is used in Customer.java [As given in problem statement] Now additional table[CUSTOMER_ORDER] is not created. Only one column in Order Table

  3. mappedby is used in Order.java Now additional table will be created by hibernate.[name = CUSTOMER_ORDER] Order Table will not have additional column [Customer_ID ] for mapping.

Any Side can be made Owner of the relationship. But its better to choose xxxToOne side.

Coding effect - > Only Owning side of entity can change relationship status. In below example BoyFriend class is owner of the relationship. even if Girlfriend wants to break-up , she can't.

 import javax.persistence.*;
 import java.util.ArrayList;
 import java.util.List;

  @Entity
  @Table(name = "BoyFriend21")
  public class BoyFriend21 {

@Id
@GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.SEQUENCE ,
        generator = "Boy_ID")
@SequenceGenerator(name = "Boy_ID" ,
        sequenceName = "Boy_ID_SEQUENCER",
        initialValue = 10,allocationSize = 1)
private Integer id;

@Column(name = "BOY_NAME")
private String name;

@OneToOne(cascade = {CascadeType.ALL})
private GirlFriend21 girlFriend;

public BoyFriend21(String name) {
    this.name = name;
}

public BoyFriend21() {
}

public Integer getId() {
    return id;
}

public void setId(Integer id) {
    this.id = id;
}

public String getName() {
    return name;
}

public void setName(String name) {
    this.name = name;
}

public BoyFriend21(String name, GirlFriend21 girlFriend) {
    this.name = name;
    this.girlFriend = girlFriend;
}

public GirlFriend21 getGirlFriend() {
    return girlFriend;
}

public void setGirlFriend(GirlFriend21 girlFriend) {
    this.girlFriend = girlFriend;
}
 }


   import org.hibernate.annotations.*;

   import javax.persistence.*;
   import javax.persistence.CascadeType;
   import javax.persistence.Entity;
   import javax.persistence.Table;
   import java.util.ArrayList;
   import java.util.List;

   @Entity 
   @Table(name = "GirlFriend21")
   public class GirlFriend21 {
    @Id
   @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.SEQUENCE ,
         generator = "Girl_ID")
      @SequenceGenerator(name = "Girl_ID" ,
        sequenceName = "Girl_ID_SEQUENCER",
        initialValue = 10,allocationSize = 1)
private Integer id;

@Column(name = "GIRL_NAME")
private String name;

@OneToOne(cascade = {CascadeType.ALL},mappedBy = "girlFriend")
private BoyFriend21 boyFriends = new BoyFriend21();

public GirlFriend21() {
}

public GirlFriend21(String name) {
    this.name = name;
}


public Integer getId() {
    return id;
}

public void setId(Integer id) {
    this.id = id;
}

public String getName() {
    return name;
}

public void setName(String name) {
    this.name = name;
}

public GirlFriend21(String name, BoyFriend21 boyFriends) {
    this.name = name;
    this.boyFriends = boyFriends;
}

public BoyFriend21 getBoyFriends() {
    return boyFriends;
}

public void setBoyFriends(BoyFriend21 boyFriends) {
    this.boyFriends = boyFriends;
}

}

      import org.hibernate.HibernateException;
      import org.hibernate.Session;
      import org.hibernate.SessionFactory;
      import org.hibernate.cfg.Configuration;

        import java.util.Arrays;

          public class Main578_DS {

          public static void main(String[] args) {
          final Configuration configuration = new Configuration();
         try {
                 configuration.configure("hibernate.cfg.xml");
               } catch (HibernateException e) {
              e.printStackTrace();
          }
    final SessionFactory sessionFactory = configuration.buildSessionFactory();
    final Session session = sessionFactory.openSession();
    session.beginTransaction();

    final BoyFriend21 clinton = new BoyFriend21("Bill Clinton");

    final GirlFriend21 monica = new GirlFriend21("monica lewinsky");

    clinton.setGirlFriend(monica);
    session.save(clinton);

    session.getTransaction().commit();
    session.close();
}

}

  import org.hibernate.HibernateException;

import org.hibernate.Session; import org.hibernate.SessionFactory; import org.hibernate.cfg.Configuration;

import java.util.List;

public class Main578_Modify {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    final Configuration configuration = new Configuration();
    try {
        configuration.configure("hibernate.cfg.xml");
    } catch (HibernateException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    final SessionFactory sessionFactory = configuration.buildSessionFactory();
    final Session session1 = sessionFactory.openSession();
    session1.beginTransaction();

    GirlFriend21 monica = (GirlFriend21)session1.load(GirlFriend21.class,10);  // Monica lewinsky record has id  10.
    BoyFriend21 boyfriend = monica.getBoyFriends();
    System.out.println(boyfriend.getName()); // It will print  Clinton Name
    monica.setBoyFriends(null); // It will not impact relationship

    session1.getTransaction().commit();
    session1.close();

    final Session session2 = sessionFactory.openSession();
    session2.beginTransaction();

    BoyFriend21 clinton = (BoyFriend21)session2.load(BoyFriend21.class,10);  // Bill clinton record

    GirlFriend21 girlfriend = clinton.getGirlFriend();
    System.out.println(girlfriend.getName()); // It will print Monica name.
    //But if Clinton[Who owns the relationship as per "mappedby" rule can break this]
    clinton.setGirlFriend(null);
    // Now if Monica tries to check BoyFriend Details, she will find Clinton is no
    // more her boyFriend
    session2.getTransaction().commit();
    session2.close();


    final Session session3 = sessionFactory.openSession();
    session1.beginTransaction();

    monica = (GirlFriend21)session3.load(GirlFriend21.class,10);  // Monica lewinsky record has id  10.
    boyfriend = monica.getBoyFriends();

    System.out.println(boyfriend.getName()); // Does not print Clinton Name

    session3.getTransaction().commit();
    session3.close();
}

}

share|improve this answer

Simple rules of bidirectional relationships:

1.For many-to-one bidirectional relationships, the many side is always the owning side of the relationship. Example: 1 Room has many Person (a Person belongs one Room only) -> owning side is Person

2.For one-to-one bidirectional relationships, the owning side corresponds to the side that contains the corresponding foreign key.

3.For many-to-many bidirectional relationships, either side may be the owning side.

Hope can help you.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.