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Are there any libraries for .NET that deal with determining the Indefinite Article of a noun?

My crude attempt is below, which will probably work for 99% of my usage (which is acceptable) just wondering if there are any established alternatives?

public static string GetIndefinateArticle(string noun)
{
    if(string.IsNullOrEmpty(noun))
        return noun;

    var first = noun[0];

    if(first == 'a' ||
        first == 'e' ||
        first == 'i' ||
        first == 'o')
        return "an " + noun;

    return "a " + noun;
}

Update: Eamon pointed out a duplicate question in the comments: How can I correctly prefix a word with "a" and "an"? I'll leave this Q here and open though, because I still don't really have an answer.

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1  
According to Grammar Girl, The use of Indefinite Article is based on the sound of the noun, Worth note it here, i think. grammar.quickanddirtytips.com –  Jhonny D. Cano -Leftware- Apr 6 '10 at 13:23
5  
yeah i realise this, but determining the sound from ascii is rather difficult! Hence wondering if there are any libs which presumably check for common starting letter combinations grouped based on their sound? –  Andrew Bullock Apr 6 '10 at 13:24
    
you should switch the "a " and "an ". –  lugte098 Apr 6 '10 at 13:34
    
doh! yes ;) fixed –  Andrew Bullock Apr 6 '10 at 13:48
1  
self? is that a synonym for this? or what is that? should it have been noun? –  Svish Apr 6 '10 at 13:54
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marked as duplicate by Bart, George Duckett, Eli, Freelancer, Lukas Knuth May 11 '13 at 16:02

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

7 Answers

If this is something you need done seriously, you may consider porting the Ruby Linguistics (English) library to .Net. It's open source & does a pretty good job of calculating the correct articles.

http://deveiate.org/projects/Linguistics/

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2  
+1 for answering the question (is there a library) rather than cobbling together some code. –  Kirk Broadhurst Apr 18 '10 at 10:29
    
Seeing as IronRuby has just been released, there may be no need to port! I shall play tomorrow. Thanks –  Andrew Bullock Apr 18 '10 at 20:51
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I've ported a function from Python that correctly determines vowel sounds in C# and posted it as an answer to the question Programmatically determine whether to describe an object with a or an?. You can see the code snippet here. It is indeed more complicated than just looking at vowels.

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Since all you're really doing is check for patterns in the string, you could use a regular expression. This should also allow for future expansion of letter combos like lutge098 talked about:

public static string GetIndefinateArticle(string noun)
{
    if (Regex.Matches(noun, "^([aeio]|un|ul)", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase))
        return "an " + noun;
    else
        return "a " + noun;
}
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It will be a long and difficult regex probably, but more effective –  lugte098 Apr 6 '10 at 14:42
    
@lugte You haven't seen a long and difficult regex until you've seen the proper way of validating an email address. It was over 6 lines long! –  Earlz Apr 18 '10 at 9:55
1  
@Earlz If you put it that way, i guess i haven't :D –  lugte098 Apr 19 '10 at 7:23
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What i would do is:

var first = noun[0];
var second = noun[1];

if(first == 'a' ||
    first == 'e' ||
    first == 'i' ||
    first == 'o')
    return "an " + self;

if(first == 'u')
    if (second == 'n' ||
        second == 'l')
        return "an " + self;

if(first == 'h')
    if (second == 'i')
        return "an " + self;

return "a " + self;

So you can define some cases where some letters in combination with each other form a certain sound. Hope this helps.

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1  
Your if statement for h is very wrong. It would produce an hit and a honor, both of which are incorrect. –  Matthew Ferreira Apr 6 '10 at 14:25
    
Are you familiar with a control statement called switch? –  ANeves Apr 6 '10 at 14:37
    
@Matthew Ferreira: keep in mind that this is just an example of concept. –  lugte098 Apr 6 '10 at 14:44
2  
The h is an unsolvable problem without a dictionary. Make your program speak Cockney, they always have a silent h so you can always pick "an". –  Hans Passant Apr 6 '10 at 15:19
    
I think that the question itself is unsolvable. Many words also have multiple pronunciations which are valid. –  Matthew Ferreira Apr 6 '10 at 15:20
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No, and it isn't as simple as just whacking an extra n when the next character is a vowel. There are a whole bunch of subtleties around it, and you also have to consider how to handle h - some use an before it, some don't.

This is also English specific, and the framework is relatively language agnostic.

This means you will have to cook it up yourself :)

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The basic rule of "a" before a consonant and "an" before a vowel gets you most of the way there, that would be very easy to implement. The problem is the "sounds-like a vowel = an" case -- that would be much harder.

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I implemented a library to do this: http://code.google.com/p/a-vs-an/; it's AvsAn on nuget. It's based on real usage patterns in wikipedia and hence even deals well with tricky things like...

  • "an 0800 number"
  • "an ∞ of oregano"
  • "a NASA flight"
  • "an NSA analyst"

In other words, it usually even will deal reasonably with many things that aren't normal words.

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