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Let's have a following simplified example:

void Foo<T>(IEnumerable<T> collection, params T[] items) 
{
    // ...
}

void Foo<C, T>(C collection, T item)
    where C : ICollection<T>
{
    // ...
}

void Main()
{
    Foo((IEnumerable<int>)new[] { 1 }, 2);
}

Compiler says:

The type 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable' cannot be used as type parameter 'C' in the generic type or method 'UserQuery.Foo(C, T)'. There is no implicit reference conversion from 'System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable' to 'System.Collections.Generic.ICollection'.

If I change Main to:

void Main()
{
    Foo<int>((IEnumerable<int>)new[] { 1 }, 2);
}

It will work ok. Why compiler does not choose the right overload?

share|improve this question
    
there really is NO conversion between IEnumerable and ICollection. –  Yossarian Apr 6 '10 at 16:58
1  
@Yossarian: two things. First, there is an explicit conversion. You mean to say "there really is no implicit reference conversion". Second, the question is not "why am I getting a 'no implicit conversion' error?" Second, the question is "why is the overload resolution algorithm picking an exact-match candidate that is invalid instead of picking the valid-but-worse candidate that does not match exactly?" –  Eric Lippert Apr 6 '10 at 20:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Your question is answered here.

http://blogs.msdn.com/ericlippert/archive/2009/12/10/constraints-are-not-part-of-the-signature.aspx

Please also read the approximately one million comments telling me that I am wrong for some interesting additional commentary on this issue.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok. Thank you for quick answer:) I have to always wait a long time before I can accept the answer:) –  TN. Apr 6 '10 at 16:59
    
I knew that I read this article and I was looking for it ... but obviously you know your blog better than me and find the articles faster - which is kind of fair ... ^^ –  tanascius Apr 6 '10 at 17:00

My guess is that the compiler chooses the best match before it uses the generic constraint. In your example the method with the constraint is preferable because it doesn't have a params last parameter.

Edit - Eric Lippert confirms this in his answer.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes. Thank you too:) –  TN. Apr 6 '10 at 17:01

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